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Full text of "The Massachusetts collegian [microform]"


I 


















MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, September 21, 1915. 



No. 1 



BOARD ANNOUNCES RULES 
FOR COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 



Large Number of Candidates Expected 

from Three Lower Classes. Place* 

Open in Both Departments. 



The annual corapetion for mem- 
bership on the Collegian board will 
be governed by the rules given be- 
low. In the editorial department 
there are five positions open and in 
the business department there are 
two vacancies. 

Membership to the Massachusetts 
Collegian board shall be gained as 
follows : 

1. Candidates shall be voted on 
during the first week in March by the 
members then holding office. A two- 
thirds vote shall be necessary for 
election. 

2. The competition shall open at 
midnight on Sept. 30, 1915 and shall 
end at midnight on March 1, 1 i> 1 • > i 

>me a candidate for elec- 

to bis credit MlittcM 
contest on March 1. 

3. To be eligible to compete, a 
candidate must have banded his name 
iu to Competition editor, F.J.Scheuf- 
ele 1916, before Nov. 1, 1915. 

4. Points for the competition may 
In* gained as follows : Those com- 
peting for positions in the editorial 
department will receive one point for 
each seven inches of original copy 

1 accepted, one point for each ten 
inches of assigned reprint matter ac- 
cepted and one point for each two 
hour period spent in office work. 
Assignments will be In charge of F. 



COLLEGE OPENS TO RECORD 
BREAKING FRESHMAN CLASS 

Two Hundred and One, Including Nine 

Co-eds, Register in Class of 1919. 

Many States Represented. 

The class of 1919 brings to the col- 
lege an unusually large number of 
men and women, there being in all 
201 members of the class, of which 
nine are co-eds. Both of these fig- 
ures are records for the college. 
Eight states are represented in the 
class besides Massachusetts, Con- 
necticut leading with eight, and the 



DR. SEERLEY TO START 

HIS LECTURES THURSDAY 

T. M. C. A. Again Takes Charge of 
Interesting Series and Asks Sup- 
port from Student Body. 

Thursday evening, Sept. 23 at 6- 
45, Dr. Seerley of Springfield Y. M. 
C. A. college will begin his series of 
lectures on "The Psychology of the 
Sex Question." While these are 
arranged primarily for the benefit of 
the new students in the college, the 
whole student body is invited to at- 
tend. Those who heard Dr. Seerley 



others following in order, New Jer- last year know him to be a most con- 




Bey five, New York three, Rhode 
Island two and one each from Ver- 
mont, Maine, Georgia and Pennsyl- 
vania. One member comes from 
Cuba. As usual the majority of the 
class come from the eastern part of 
the state, especially from Boston 
and its vicinity 

usjoving is the g^ryi! a* 

m 

Al.fcUiia, J*N>i> 
Allien. I lean W. 
Anderson, (Jeorjfc 
Andrew*. Milton K. 
linker. William A. 
Baker. William II. 
Bartlett, Saiouel C. 
Batista, Vielor 



vincing speaker and will surely ap 
predate the opportunity of hearing 
him again. The entire series of lect- 
ures is being held under the manage- 
ment of the college Y. M. C. A. and 
this organization iu return looks to 
the student body for support, both 



■ 

r- 



o 



[Continued on yaite .1] 



Honerville 

Ifammontoti, N. J. 

Mel ruse 

Cuesterlielfl 

(olerain 

Havana, Cuba 

liatchehler, Stewart P. North Ueadinjj 
Bath, Kiehard O. Weal Springfield 

Wifelowe. (ieorge S. Millville. \. 3, 

IJlanchani, t'arlum I). txhriilge 

ffontitwed ntl IMIH* "] 




LARGE f QUAD REPORTS FOR 
PRACTICE ON ALUMNI FIELD 

Pootball Prospects Never Brighter 

Considering the Hard Schedule. 

Nine Varsity Men Return, 

Football practice has hew carried 
on in tersest thin week in spite of 
weather far better salted lot base- 
ball. With the Dartmouth game 
only a week away Coach Brides lias 
driven the squad in rudimentary 
work aud fast signal practice. The 
'varsity squad includes about forty 
men, wink- the freshmen have thirty- 
five working under (Sore. Melioan 
'15, captain of last year's team, bat* 
been assisting with the quaiterbacks 
this week 

The lineup of the first team has 
varied considerably fnmi day to day. 
The loss of Melicau, Dole, Whorl', 
Fuller and Williams have left several 
vacaucies to Ut lillcU anjJ there have 
ji loiistaai thiNr iVlni. " u«. 



BEGINS 



TO THIS 



Palmer have both worked on in* 



SOPHS WIN EOPE PULL 
Lack of Team Work Loses foe 
Hi SKI Fkkshmkn. 
Nineteen-eighteen triumphed over 
the freshmen Friday afternoon, win- 
ng the annual rope pall in easy 
*hion. The extreme temperature, 
vlilch threatened to force a postpone- 
ment of the contest, was broken just 
efore the pull, thus making Ideal 
cather conditions. From the start 
U19 handled the rope poorly, at no 
ine polling together. The sopbo- 
lores, on the other hand worked as 
ii unit and were never in danger. By 
he time the last shot was fired every 
eshman had been pulled through 
ie pond. An enthusiastic crowd of 
averai hundred spectators watched 
ie contest. 



FALL TRACK WORK 
No Varsity Men Lost 
Year Team. 

Prospects for a highly successful 
cross-country team this season are 
exceedingly bright, according to Cap- 
taiu Russell of 'varsity track. 

The team still has Richards and 
Aiken, last year's leading men, and 
the most important thing now is to 
develop the rest of the men to finish 
as near them as is possible. Schwarx 
ex-*16 is back, snd if eligible will be 
as good as any member of the team. 
He has done some excellent running 
daring the summer, and it is very 
possible that he will win the inter- 
class race, or at least give Richards 
a hard race. 

Glover, Russell and Coley *1<» and 
Pratt '17 of last year's varsity team 
are oat again this year, and together 
with several 1918 men not eligible 
last season, they should form a 
strong squad to work up. Mitchell 



CHANGES IN FACULTY 

Tiik CotAKM to Lose Sevkiial 
(iooo PiioKKssoiss. pRoiNrnoss 

Announced. 
The trustees of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College at their semi- 
annual meeting, held at Amherst 
June 15, adopted a plan recom- 
mended by the faculty whereby sum- 
mer work in practical departments 
would lie offered and credit allowed 
for graduation. This plan will per- 
mit some portions of the work re- 
quired for graduation to lie done in 
the summer months when in certain 
departments such work can be done 
to the best advantage. The first 
departments to take advantage of 
this plan will be those in agriculture 
and horticulture. This plan will 
also make the college plant available 
for instruction purposes daring the 
entire year. The plan may result in 
certain students completing their 
required work for graduation In the 
early spring, thus permitting them to 
accept positions at that time when in 
many departments the demand is 

greatest. 

The following promotions in the 
faculty were made : 

S. B. Haskell from associate pro- 
fessor of agronomy to professor of 
agronomy, H. E. Baldinger from 




1 1 am t IniM'rt mi !«««■ l] 



( .'AITAIN Ct KKAK. 

first team. Buck 'li has been play- 
ing center in most of the signal woik 
with Yerbeck MB on the seconds. 
Captain Curran '16 has been tried »i 
halfback, with Palmer '\v, and 
Darling *16 in the other positions, 
Weeks MR has also b«W "m-'I ©■ Ibi 
first team. On the seconds are Boh ■ 



[< <mi' inin'il mi {(ureal 



i i 




v 



'17, Rich '16, Chisolm '1<5 and Cubb- 
ing *16. 

Dunn '18 and Perry '1G have been 
worked with the first squad, while 
Verbeck'16, Seheufele 'lfi, Spauld- 
ing '18 and Petit '18 have been 
worked with the scrubs. The first 
to.'tin tackles have been Plaisted '10 
and Danforth '111, and ends of prom- 
ise include Day '17, Jordan '10 and 
I i ray son '17. 

The first scrimmage waB held Mon- 
day and the squad put through a 
hard drill. Every one realized that 
this year's schedule is a hard one. 
Starting with the big Green team on 
Saturday, Harvard, Colby, Holy 
Cross, Worcester Tech, Tufts, Mid- 
dlcbtiry and Springfield will be met. 
Two games will be pbiyed on alumni 
field, the Colby and Middlebury 
games. 

The Dartmouth team promises to 
be a strong one this year. Practice 
started there two weeks ago and a 
large heavy squad has reported. 
Last year, although beaten 20 to 0, 
the M. A. C. team was the only one 
beside Princeton to scote on Dart- 
mouth. This year the team confi- 
dently expects to do even better. 
The student body is behind it as 
never before, a new field awaits to be 
christened by a winning team and a 
large squad is working bard under a 
premier coach. 



CHANGES 

i] 




date professor of rural engiaseriug 
to professor of rural engineering, W. 
W. Cheuoweth from assistant pro- 
fessor of pomology to associate pro- 
fessor of pomology, P. J. Anderson 
from instructor in botany to assistant 
professor in botany, 6. C. Cramptou 
from associate professor of entomol- 
ogy to professor of insect morphol- 
ogy, W. K. Prince formerly instructor 
in English now assistant professor of 
English, A. A. Mackimmie formerly 
assistant professor of French now 
associate professor of French, K. L. 
Ashley formerly assistant professor 
of German now associate professor 
of German, A. E. Cance formerly 
assistant professor of agricultural 
economics now professor of agricul- 
tural economies. 

The trustees accepted the resigna- 
tion of Robert II. Bogue, who for 
three years had been connected with 
the chemistry department. .Mr. 
Ilogue has accepted an attractive 
position in the department of chem- 
istry at the Montana Agricultural 
College. Paul Serex, Jr., a gradu- 
ate of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College in 1913 and for two years a 
graduate assistant and graduate stu- 
•lent in the department of chemistry 
at the same institution, was elected 
to fill the position made vacant by 
Mr Bogue'l resignation. 

Arao Itano, who for two years has 
served as graduate assistant in the 
department of microbiology, was 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. It, 1915. 



elected to the position of assistant in 
that depaitment. 

The trustees have elected Earl 
Jones of Orono, Me. as assistant 
professor of agronomy. Mr Jones 
was born and brought up on a farm 
in Ohio, graduated from the Ohio 
State University in 1912, the follow- 
ing year receiving the degree of Mas- 
ter of Science in the same institu- 
tion. For two years Mr. Jones has 
been instructor in the College of 
Agriculture at the University of 
Maine. 

Alfred G. Lunn of the Oregon 
Agricultural College, has been elected 
extension instructor in poultry hus- 
bandry both in practical work and in 
college and experiment station work. 
He has served with the Cyphors Incu- 
bator Company, Utah Agricultural 
Experiment Station, California State 
Polytechnic School and the Oregon 
Agricultural College. He gradu- 
ated from the Oregon Agricultural 
College in 1912, and until the present 
time has been assistant professor in 
poultry husbandry at that institution. 

H. C. Tompson of Worcester has 
been elected assistant in physics. 
Mr. Tompson graduated from the 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 
1915. 

Charles H. Thompson has been 
elected to the position of assistant 
professor of horticulture. Mr. 
Thompson graduated from the Kan- 



States. For several years he ha 
served at the Missouri Botanical Gar- 
den at St. Louis, where he has had a 
very successful career as a teacher 
and investigator. 

Eric N. Boland has been appointed 
as extension instructor in charge 
of pig club work. The United 
States department of agriculture is 
co-operating with the college in 
promoting this type of work in Mass- 
achusetts. Mr. Itoland graduated 
from the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College in 1912, having specialized 
while there in animal husbandry. 
He pursued graduate work in animal 
husbandry at the Iowa State College, 
and received the degree of Master of 
Science in 1918. For two years be 
has been connected with the depart- 
ment of animal husbandry at the Uni- 
versity of Maine, in which position 
he has made a conspicuous success. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural 
College has appointed Andrew S. 
Thomson assistant professor of mar- 
ket gardening. Mr. Tomson is a 
graduate of Brown University, and 
has spent two yearsin graduate study 
at Columbia I'niversity; he also 
studied at Cornell. For twelve 
years he was superintendent of pub- 
lic schools in Eastern Massachusetts, 
and since 1912 has taught psycho- 
ogy and agriculture in the Clarion, 
Pa. Normal School. Mr. Thomson 
comes to Massachusetts with the 
highest endorsement as a man of 



large ability, and as an exceptionally 
competent teacher. 

George F. Story has resigned as 
extension instructor in animal hus- 
bandry. Mr. Story came to the col- 
lege in the spring of 1911 to take 
charge of the extension work in ani- 
mal husbandry. During the four 
years that he has worked in the 
state he has done much to encourage 
the live stock industry, and has won 
the universal respect and confidence 
of the farmers. He has been par- 
ticularly instrumental in organizing 
and supervising the various cow test- 
ing associations in the various parts 
of the state. Mr. Story has been 
elected professor of animal and dairy 
husbandry at the Agricultural College 
at the University of Vermont, where 
he will have charge of the teaching, 
research and extension work. 

The trustees have recently elected 
John Phelan of Wisconsin, as pro- 
fessor of rural sociology. This is 
the position made vacant by the res- 
ignation of Prof. K. K. Eyerly last 
autumn. Professor Phelan was 
brought up on a farm in Michigan, 
and is a graduate of the Western 
Michigan State Normal School, and 
also has the degrees of A. B. and 
A. M. from the University of Michi- 
gan. At the University he special- 
ized in economics, philosophy and 
rural sociology. Since graduation 
he has been very largely in normal 
school wui'ki wijli *p<^i*l i'elejjajice 
of nwal ftottohitrv 



M,,. ,).-: 



no 

Urge amount of lecturing and general 
field work. Professor Phelau is said 
to be a man of great energy and en- 
thusiasm, and possesses a strong, 
engaging personality. His wife was 
for a number of years director of the 
training school at the Western Mich- 
igan Normal School. They have 
one child. 

Prof. . I. A. Mi-I.e:ui has resigned 
to take up work in the Public Service 
Department of the ljuaker Oats 
Company of Boston Professor Mc- 
Lean has been at the head of the 
department of animal husbandry 
Bince the winter of 1911, and has 
been a very influential leader in stim- 
ulating interest in the live stock in- 
dustry of Massachusetts. Under 
Professor McLean's direction the 
animal husbandry work of the col- 
lege has been gieatly improved. He 
has developed the teaching work so 
that now there are offered a aeries of 
courses intended to fully equip young 
men to engage in the animal hus- 
bandry industry, or to become teach- 
ers, investigators, and extension ser- 
vice workers in this field. He has 
encouraged the work of live stpek 
judging among the students, and 
teams representing the Agricultural 
College have repeatedly won distinc- 
tion in stock judging contests in New 
England and at the International 
Dairy Show at Chicago. The live 
stock equipment at the college has 
under Professor McLean's direction 



been greatly amplified during tL 
past few years. He has also bees 
influential in organizing cow testiii 
associations in various parts of th 
state. 

Philip H. Elwood, Jr., haB ae 
cepted a position in the departmen 
of horticulture at the Ohio State Doi 
versity, where he will organize ain 
have charge of the work in landscap 
gardening. Mr. Elwood has for t\v 
years served as a special agent fo 
the Agricultural College in landscap 
work throughout the state, dealing 
principally with the landscape gar 
dening problems of small towns. II. 
has presented plans for the laud 
scape development of school grounds, 
commons, and other public 'center 
in various Massachusetts towns, and 
has made a conspicuous success as ■ 
leader in this particular phase <»! 
rural art. 

Miss Harriet J. Hopkins, who foi 
a year has been assistant in the de 
partment of home economics of the 
extension service, has accepted ■ 
position as head of the department 
of home economics at the University 
of Oklahoma. 



Y. M. C. A. 

[Conttntted fr»» pnt«!] 



th 




othei lines. Realizing the needs of 
new students entering a Strang 
place, the Association published u 
handbook, of which the only un- 
pleasant feature was that the demand 
sdfd the sjM»^>^ lil imiffh ^:,(i 
■oobs went prised 

" .tr, dap |MUl. it 

appoint some <>\ 

who wished to buy copies of the new 

"bibles." 

The Y. M. C. A. is now located in 
Dr. Cance's old office in the Fast 
entry of North College. Here wan 
conducted an Information bureau for 
new students during the opening 



... 




Dk. Sekri.kv. 

days of college. A telephone hM 
been installed and will be availal f 
to any and all students, for kxil 
calls only. The Association also of- 
fers the use of this office as a meet- 
ing room for any college organ 1 *• 
tton. In trying thus to serve IN 
students in every way possible I * 
Y. M. C. A. have hopes soon to « - 
serve the local support of ev< f 
Aggie man. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 21, 191 5. 



FALL TRACK WORK 
[Continued from i«uc 1] 

tad Babbitt *18 are good prospects; 
l.vons *1H also ran well last year. 

Coach Whittier whose work with 
the squad last season was so satis- 
factory will not be here this year, 
ut the experience of the veterans 
:ind letter men and the assistance of 
Professor Hicks should go far toward 
developing a formidable team for any 
>ppouent. 

Manager Rieker has drawn up a 
schedule of four races,- the first of 
»vhich will be the intei class run, prob- 
ably on the morning of the day of the 
Colby game on Alumni Field, Oct. 
.'. The team will go to Worcester ( >ct. 
23, with the football men, both teams 
meeting Worcester Polytech on that 
late, the cross-countrv run to finish 
lutween the halves of the football 
.:uiiie. Worcester ran in Amherst 
last year, and three Aggie men fin- 
ished ahead of the first Tech runner. 
There seems to be no reason why the 
men should not repeat this perform- 
ance. The next race comes on the 
lay of the Middlelmrv game, Nov. 
(5, with the strong M.I. T. team as 
opponents. This will be a home 
contest and will afford the only op- 
■01 limits to see the vursitv team in 
a race here. M. 1. T. finished sec- 
ond in the intercollegiate races last 
fall, while M. A. C. finished fourth, 
hut the Tech team lost Cook, one of 
its fastest runners, by graduation, 
while Aggie did not lose ;i man. *Q 
that chances of a victory for either 
team are about half and half. The 
iiinual intercollegiate cross country 
run cronies Saturday Nov. 18, at 
I ranklin Park, Boston, over the 
MUM course as last year. There is 
a possible chance of a contest with 
the fast University of Maine team. 
but the long trip with great expense 
will probably present it. It is prob- 
able that the two teams will fight it 
-ut in the iutercollegiates, as Maine 
lias the same team us last seasou, 

hen they finished first. 

The Dartmouth management is 

nxious to arrange a race, but their 
• Lhletic board did not deem it wise 
finance a trip of the Aggie runners 
to Hanover. 



The new fence is almost completed. 
It is made of iron piping set in con- 
crete on which is stretched a heavy 
wire fencing. This combination 
makes a very stable enclosure for 
the new field. The 1913 entrance 
gate will be started this fall or early 
next spring and will prove a great 
addition to the field, giving it a 
finish that it justly deserves. 

The Sophomore-Freshmen baseball 
series is being played on the new 
field and football practice has been 
held there since it started. The 
soft new turf has proved to be far 
better than the stony, hard land on 
the old field. 



ATHLETIC FIELD 

At last the new athletic field is a 

alitv. Saturday, while the Sopho- 

.ores were defeating the Freshmen 

to 4 on one level of the field, the 

unity football squad was piacticing 

n the lower level. 

The heavy rains of the past sum- 
were excellent for the new 
iited grass and now there is a fine 
>d on both the football field and the 
.seball diamond. The heavy rains 
ise the underground drainage sys- 
, of the field a severe test, but 
rofessor Hicks was unable to find 
• n one spot where there was stand- 
>g water. In the early fall a fine 
op of hay was obtained from the 
Id, and now it is being treated 
i.e a lawn. 



SOPHOMORE FRESHMAN 

Puomising Material out for Fall 
Practick. 

The Sophomores defeated the 
Freshmen Saturday 5 to 4 on the 
□ew athletic field. Considering the 
lack of team practice the game was 
very well played. The Freshmen 
tied the score at 4 all in the eighth 
iuning but their opponents came 
through with the winning run in the 
ninth. Richardson starred for the 
winners with three hits while Mc- 
Carthy led his team at the bat with a 
single and a double, (.^uinby struck 
out 15 Sophomores. 

The score : 



COMPETITION RULES 

[I'lintinuvd from imite l] 

J. Seheufele, 1916, who will ordinarily 
make certain assignments on request. 
The reporting of assembly speeches, 
addresses, etc., is reprint work. 

5. The number of positions open 
in each class, in the editorial depart- 
ment is, 1917—1, 1918—2, 1919—2. 

6. The board reserves the right 
to withhold election in either depart- 
ment, editorial or business, if, in its 
judgment the poor work of any one 
group of candidates justifies it. In 
such case the competition for vacan- 
cies will be in charge of the uew 
board, after it has come into office on 
March 15. 

An exception to rule three of the 
competition in the business depart- 
ment is also to be noted. All candi- 
dates for the position of circulation 
manager must have handed in their 
names to Business Manager Charles 
A. Huntington, .Ir., 1916, before 
Nov. 1, l'.H'i in order to be eligible 
as competitors. 

Charles Gould, editor-in-chief of 
the 191G Index, has resumed his 
studies with the Senior class after a 
year's work at the Cniversty of Texas. 



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27 



MASS MEETING AND BONFIRE 

IMU.HIIMKN OO THROUGH ITSI Al. THURS- 
DAY Nmjht Stunt. 
Thursday night the freshmen were 
treated to a rare surprise. As cus- 
tomary they gathered for rope-pull 
practice hack of the hams, led on, of 
course, hy the juniors. Just as they 
were heaving on the rope in spirited 
fashion, however, the whole sopho- 
more class rushed from hack of the 
hams upon the unsuspecting fresh- 
men. A sharp scrap followed after 
which the "frosh" were lined up and 
marched to the bonfire. The student 
body then gathered around while a 
short program was carried out. 
Among those who spoke were Coach 
Brides, Mr. Hicks, Mr. Gore, Cap- 
tain ( urran, and Manager Moses. 
All urged that the student body give 
a loyal support to the team through* 
out the season. The entire affair was 
in charge of the .Senate. 



is 



• i 



SOME STORE 



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SAVE MONEY AND GET REAL SHOE SAT I M< ACTION. 



Korker " Robber Soles and Heels put on for $1.75 double wear. 



School and Colke* Photographers . . . 




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These Studios offer the best skilled 
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m 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 21, 191 5. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. if, 191 5. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

TYLER S. ROGERS 'l*. Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD W, SMITH '17, Managing Editor 
I RANK f. SC H El) F B I B ' i ft, A ssistant Editor 
THOS.L IIAKKIH KS'ift, Athletic Editor 
ALFRED A. GIOIOSA '16, Athletic Editor 
DWIGH'I P. II VR NES 'ib, Alumni Editor 
HILFORD K I .A WHENCE '17, News Editor 
I' I I in 1 HENDERSON*!?, DepartmentEditor 
WILLIAM SAVILJ.K, Ja, 'ty, Cimpus Editor 
HAROLD B rOWES 'i& Associate Editor 
HARSH \i.i ,0 LANPHEAR't8, fcsso'e Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

CHAS. A. HUNTINGTON. JR. '16. 

(Justness Manager 
MERRILL P. WARNER '17. 

Assistant Business Manager 
LESTER E. FIELDING '16. 

Advertising Manager 
'AMES C. POWELL '■*. Circulation 

Subscription #1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 

to Chariks a. Huntington, Jr. 

Enured as aecond-ctass matter at the Amherst 
Post Offte*. 

Vol. XXVI. Tuesday, Sept. 21. No. I 



Mas-v hi -1 11 « filters upon another 
year with I record freshman class. 
The figures indicate that the period of 

expansion ami growth which the col- 
lege ha« enjoyed for nearly a decade 
DM not OMtcdf nor lias the rate of 
growtfa diminished. Cmollnry to tliis 
iniinerical gTOWtll there has been for 
several yeara ■ perceptible change in 
the personnel of the entering classes 
which is but one of the many signs of 
the great agricultural movement 
The new men are being recruited 
more from the cities and large towns 
than ever before ; men are being 
drawn away from the classical col- 
leges ; and men from well to do fami- 
lies are turning from business careers 
|0 agriculture. With this growth 
comes prestige, and prestige eucour- 
agei further expansion. Massachu- 
setts of the ratlin is 11 bright vision. 



OrPOMl'UWTI never knocks so in- 
-i-tcntlv as now to the men of the 
entering class. He who heeds the 
openings which :nv before him finds 
his way clear to recognition ami suc- 
oeaa in college. Excellence in studies 
are but a part— though an important 
part — of college life. K<|iiully import- 
ant is participation in some of the 
activities of the undergraduates. 
Athletics attract many of the live 
men. Non-athletics offer equally 
great opportunities Through par* 
licipalion in the various activities one 
gains not only a training, menially or 
physically, hut is brought to the at- 
tention of the student body and gains 
many acquaintances and friends 
thereby. The Collegian, the Dra- 
matics and Musical dubs, the Rifle 
club, managerships of athletic teams 
and similar activities are open gate- 
ways to prominence and success in 
college. 



Mini credit is due the branch of 
the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion which has recently been estab- 



lished in this institution, in place of 
the former M. A. C. Christian Asso- 
ciation. Almost a forgotten organi- 
zation except by a faithful few, and 
long unappreciated in regard to its 
possible benefits, it has gradually 
emerged from obscurity to its right- 
ful standing as a leading influence. 

Highly commendable indeed is the 
work accomplished by this association 
in the publication of the 1915-16 
Handbook. Such a guide has been 
sadly needed here, and its success, 
socially at least, and as a guide for 
members of the entering class, was 
inevitable, if properly composed. 
Its important information in respect 
to matters of general interest is valua- 
ble in the extreme. 

But not with the Handbook does 
the good work of the Young Men's 
Christian Association reach its climax. 
A new source of assistance and in- 
formation is opened up with the 
establishing of the Y. M. C. A. office 
which has already proved a great 
help to freshmen desiring rooms or 
knowledge concerning other necessi- 
ties of college life. Open at all 
times, it renders all possible assist- 
ance free, including telephoue service 
to any part of Amherst. 

Then again, it is through this asso- 
ciation that a new courae of Seerley 
lectures is being given for the benefit 
of the student body. Surely such 
work on the part of this growing 
organization is deserving of much 
praise, and is worthy of much more 
consistent support than has hereto- 
fore been afforded it. 

PERSONALS 

Dubois '18 has transferred to 
Brown. 

Wolfson 'lx expects to enter 
Harvard. 

T. Palmer Wilcox ex-' It! has en- 
tered the Junior class. 

McKechnie '18 will enter the Soph- 
omore class at M. I. T. 

1'nderwood, Barbour and McClel- 
lan, all 1918 men will not return to 
college this year. 

George W. Danforth '16 repre- 
sented his chapter at the Kappa 
Sigma conclave held at the Panama 
exposition in July. 

The Massachusetts chapter of 
Alpha Sigma Phi was represented at 
the conclave at the Panama exposi- 
tion by Schlotterbeck *lf>. 

Norman McCullock ex-' 16 has en- 
tered the Junior class at Dartmouth. 
Warner B. Stuitevant '17 "M" man 
in track, has also goue to this college. 

BARBECUE COMING SOON 
St<m KmtinoE Ci.tn Plait I'nique 
Ai 1 mi: for Oct, 2. 
A novel entertainment in the form 
of an old fashioned field day and bar- 
becue la being planned by the Stock- 
bridge club for the afternoon of Oct, 
2. The familiar greaaed pig and the 
other ' omit 1 y sports are to be a part 
of the program, which will wind npin 
the late afternoon with a real bar- 
becue, In which a whole j>ork or beef 



will be sacrificed to satisfy the appe- 
tites of those present. The menu 
has not been completed but the club 
plans to make it wholly appropriate 
and adequate. The barbecue will be 
over in time for the "house warming" 
party in Stock bridge Hall. 

The club especially desires the 
freshmen to take part in the events 
and to become acquainted with the 
work of the agricultural club. Its 
various activities will be discussed 
by a few faculty members after the 
spread. Further details and a pro- 
gram will appear later. 



WHICH WILL YOU BUY 

A "cream thief" or 



a "savings bank" 
Cream Separator ? 



A CREAM SEPARATOR IS 
used twice a day, 730 times a 
year, and if it wastes a little 
cream every time you use it it's 
a "cream thief ", and an expen- 
sive machine even if you got it 
as a gift. 

BUT IF IT SKIMS CLEAN TO 
the one or two hundredths of 
one per cent, as thousands and 
thousands of tests with a Bab- 
cock Tester show the De Laval 
does, then it's a cream saver, 
and the most profitable machine 
or implement on the farm — a 
real "savings bank" for its 
fortunate owner. 

THE MOST PROFITABLE 
machine on the farm is a De 
Laval Cream Separator. 

THE DE IAVAL SEPARATOR GO. 



16$ Broadway 

NK W YORK 



19 E. Madison St. 

CHICAGO 



Kmii.iiiio IMIi'J 

Stki'hen Lank Folokr 

MANITACIIIRINO JIWSLKR 

180 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 



< l .1 • li AND COLLKOE 
I'lNs AND HINtiS * 

GOLD, S1L.VBM AND HHONZH MHIMIA 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO, 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 

S*tti Cleaned, Pressed and Dyed All kinds of 

Repairing for Ladies and Gentkmea neatly done. 

High-grade work by first-class tailor. Work 

called for and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing, 

4 suits roa $1.50 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, PttOP. 

Main Street, Amherst, Mass. Nash Block 

Oa your way to the Post Office. Tel. 43*- W 

UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

1: 1 < • 1 1 \ ic SUNDAY - 1 i: v 1 1 K AT 1 P. U. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CI kK AN A DYER T Props. 

Loose-Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
—Pens— 



S. 8. HYDE 

JEWELER ft OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 
Oculists* Prescriptions Pilled. Broken Lenses 
Aecurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and .Skilfully Done, 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



They're not short-lived 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 eighteen Jersey 
cows were officially tested 
which averaged \'i years 
and 7 months of ape. Their 
average milk production 
was 8617 pounds. Average 
butter fat, 387 pounds. One 
of these cows was over 18 
years old. 
Longevity, Constitution and Economic 
Production are Jersey characteristics. 

THE AMKRICAN JEKSET CATTLE CLUB 
324 W. 234 St., New York City 




FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOF.MAN 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

COLLRGB IKWHLKY 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHKRST, MASS. 
Next to Post Office. 

Amherst 

CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-150 

■ i-*c 

s 1 -•• 

48c per dor 

30c per do;. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, ft .50 a Suit 



R. T. FaosT.Agent ; D. Sherinyan, Asst. Agent 
— Try omt ticket system — 

Pot foil nam* and address OS hwfldr) 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

tlrown by the Floricultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
Bowers and plants at reasonable rate 
to students and faculty. This stot^ 
is grown in modern houses uml> 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnation - 
violets, chrysanthemums and sw< 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

T>i«i»hou* see 



WEBSTER'S STUHO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 
Oood work speaks for Itself. 
Nash Block, Amherst, Ma 



Y. M. C. A. RECEPTION 

Nearly the entire college turned 
( t to greet the entering class 
1 the Y. M. C. A. reception in the 
Drill Hall Friday evening. At a 
1 mservative estimate five hundred 
v re present, and of its kind the 
f mction was undoubtedly the most 
1 cessful that has been held in re- 

,t years. From 8 o'clock until af- 
u t nine an informal get-together was 
enjoyed, the Freshmen and the upper- 
classmen introducing themselves to 
each other by means of name tags. 
A number of selections were played 
hv the college orchestra, and the serv- 
ing of punch and light refreshments 
helped to keep up the circulation of 
the crowd as well as of its compon- 
ent members. 

The speech-making was opened by 
Harold Most nun. who introduced 
President Butterfield. Moses spoke 
on "Athletics," evoking some sur- 
prise when he made the statement 
tlmt studies should come first and 
athletics second. James T. Nichol- 
son gave a fine tttlk on "Non-Athlet- 
ics," referring to the work of the 
'Irttinatic club, musical clubs and the 
< oi.i.F.ciAN. Hicks, president of the 
Y. M. C. A., explained the program 
of the association, and Sheik out- 
lined the work of the social service 
rmnpaigu. The evening was con- 
cluded by the singing of the college 
»«>ng. 



M. F. DICKINSON DEAD 

M. Fayette Dickinson, a former 
trustee of the college, died at his an- 
cestral home, opposite Brook's Farm, 
Saturday.' Mr. Dickinson, while 
carrying on n successful practice as 
lawyer in Bostou, took an active in- 
terest in the welfare of Aggie. He 
graduated from Amherst College in 
1H62, even while this etimpus was 
farm land. Thus he has watched 
the college grow from the day of its 
foundation. One of his last duties 
to the institution was to serve on the 
committee which selected the spot 
for the present " agricultural group" 
of buildings. 



NIGHT SHIRT PARADE 

i mxtkuestiko ar-'kaik emm in 
Lively Mix-up. 

Freshman hazing came to a close 
s t unlay night with the annual 
"night shirt parade." The affair 

• Miild hardly be termed successful. 
First of all the parade itself, the 
speeches on the common were unin- 
t* renting, lacking in the life shown in 
former years. Then again, contrary 
to the ruling of the senate, the fresh* 
in- 11 attempted to break near the 
( tholic church. A sharp scrap 

• 1 "tied with the result that several 
n n are bow laid up in the infirmary, 
»ome with sprained ankles or wrists. 
Flower beds, fences, and lawns like- 
wise suffered. The sophomores 

Hy succeeded in capturing about 
freshmen and the parade pro- 
" >led Op to chapel. 

\s yet no action has been taken, 
b the future of the parade is doubt* 
to . Started with the idea of afford- 
in a good time, it has gradually 
1 'ted into a scrap involving not only 
n lege men but townspeople as well. 
If 'he custom is allowed to live at all, 
it will probably be under close 
n trictioos. 



\ recent number of the "American 
A araliMt" contains an elaborate 
pt. er entitled "Inheritance of Habit 
in the Common Bean." This was 
pi pared as a thesis by Mr. John B. 
N ton in the regular work in llorti- 
ci are last year. 



GOLD MEDAL FOR M. A. C. 

The Palace of Kducation at the 
Panama-Pacific International expo- 
sition awarded the Massachusetts 
Ai^i (cultural College a gold medal 
for its work in education. Smith 
College and the Landscape Architec- 
ture school of Harvard University 
were recognized in a like manner. 
The state of Massachusetts received 
the highest award of honor for its 
educational work. 

The gold medal which the expo- 
sition has granted the college ranks 
it third class in the rating of the 
institutions of the countrv. 



TRIVIAL TOPICS 

At the opening Assembly, Presi- 
ded Butterfield announced the watch- 
word for the coming year : "Friend- 
liness." At first the Fresh men 
were inclined to he sceptical, but the 
universally friendly treatment which 
they have received during the past 
week, ought certainly to have allayed 
all their doubts. 

• • ♦ • • 

The woods arc full of Huron*. 
Barbarism is still rampant. Heaven 
save our scalp-locks ! It was a wise 
scientist who first observed that the 
life history of an individual repeats 
the life history of his race ; in the 
natural order of things the promising 
young scion passes successively 
through the cave man stage and the 
wild Indian stage, he becomes a 
gauntleted knight and a Crusader, he 
waxes Puritan and then Cavalier, and 
finally (if all goes well) he blossoms 
out into l thoroughly modernized 
disciple of Vernon Castle. 

At a certain period in h person's 
development he is supposed to have 
outgrown his cave man tendencies, he 
is supposed to have passed the wild 
Indian stage, and while his patch- 
work might still bear traces of the 
old Adam, he is expected to give 
civilization its due by ucting some- 
what civilized. 

And yet — recall the night-shirt 
parade — the woods are fall of Hu* 
n>ii> ' The aborgines cherished 
physical ideals ; mentally they were 
undeveloped, spiritually they were 
inert. Are we so much better than 
thev? 



You'll have to hand it to us 

On Our New made to Pleasure Suits 

From 820 to S30 

Made at 112 Fifth Ave., N. Y. 

Ou Our New Beady lu Wear Glumes 

FINEST IN THE WOKLIl 

Blue Flannel Norfolk and wniie Tiousers 

At 814.50 

Tryoiion Knit Koifoik and Flannel Trousers 

At 8I6.50 

On the fact that we have the experts in our own tailoi simp to make any changt s 

you may want. 

On the HAND TAILORED SUITS, made in our own shop, 

from $32 to $45 

Spring Line of Aquascutums Just Received 

CAMPION COLLEGE OUTFITTER 

Fine Tailoring Hen's Furnishings 

Aiterbury System Clothes of Fifth Avenue. 





. A SHEPARD 

ME N'S STO RE 

Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring- 



Come to us for- 






Fireplace Goods, Coat and Tronser Hangers 

* Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brashes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



E.WAYS "In Good Form" 

to answer all formal or informal communications upon 

Symphony Lawn Writing Paper 

'inn ahotlld choose this " Paper Beautiful" for all 
writing purposes because it gives to the user that tone 
r.f style and quiet refinement which nowadays is so 
necessary, Symphony Lawn writing paper comes in 
all styles and sites; Box papers, "at home" cards, 
desk pads, and pound papers, with envelopes to match 
—In white and modish tints, 

40a and upwards 

Henry Adams & Go. 



Sold only at The Rexell Store 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 21, 191 5. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. si, 191 5. 



J. OI^SBUKO 

11 12 Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

76c Special Half Sole, Rubber 75 c 

HBPAIRING 

Black, Tan, White Work Guaranteed. 

S~»I*IC*I£» 

Rubber Soles 

Rubber Soles, with Heels 

Soles Sewed, ..... 



• I. SO 

• 1.75 

75c 



ii Shines fur SI.UO 



E. B. DIOKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: oto ia a. m., i-jo to 5 >*• «• 



xTEAM KITTING. Telephone Jo— 1< 

GAS PIT TING, TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 
Windows, Lead Lights, &c. 

• Clifton Ave.. AM H ERST. MASS. 



N OTIC E ! 

It is with great pleasure that we announce the arrival of our new styles in 

Woolens and Fashions for Spring and Summer 

Included in our selection is a large assortment of 

Imported and Domestic Woolens and Gents' Furnishings 

Guaranteed Fabrics 

These cloths are made only for Merchant Tailors, and are well known for 

their individuality and t-xclusiveness of colorings and designs. 

Their quality is assured you by the trade-m.u k stamped 

on the goods. I can till your orders now on 

the latest goods and styles, and 

you can save a 

Discount of 20% on Every Dollar 

WHY NOT BUY NOW? 

Also the Finest Full Dress Suits.and Caps and Gowns for Sale or Rent 

Suits for ladies and men remodeled, repaired, dye<l, cleaned and pressed. 
We respectfully solicit your early inspection. 



Telephone J02-W | g A P>t^l IV If ] /^ II Amity Street 



— r — 



Fine Tailoring and dents' Furnishings. 



We have so «« 



ill ¥ ,1 i- |.|i*ir*J up-to-the-minute 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 



the most economical you can use, 

BetteR crops 




are the inevitable result. 



THE ROGERS ft HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

lIRw and w... k«. !■■•• i i.m.i < ...... 



COPLEY SQUARE HOTEL 

Huntington Ave., Exeter and Btagdcn Sis., Boston, /Vtass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the ciiy. 

AMOS H. WHIPPLE, prop. 



C&rp{ivter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst. M 



1915 MEN AROUND COLLEGE 
There is quite a nucleus of 1915 
men here at college, to make it more 
homelike to any of the fellows who 
can come back and visit us: "Hill" 
Dorau, graduate assitant in botany 
and "Gibby" Perry, same in chemis- 
try ; post graduates in entomology 
include "Al" Flebut, "Hay" Mc- 
KecUnie, "Stii" Viual, "Hill" Herois, 
and "Shrimp" Lovejoy ; "Mac" Mac- 
Neil is a P. G. in chemistry. 
"Monty" is assistant superintendent 
of the college farm, and "Kippy" 
Goodwin of the Grounds Department. 
"Dick" Taft and V. W. Marsh are in 
town for the time being, and George 
Meltejiii drifts in once in a while 
from his milk testing trips. 

News from other fellows will be 
published later— if you have uot 
already done so, scud word to the 
secretary as to what you are doing, 
and news about the other men of the 
class with whom you have kept in 
touch. 



Now is the time to be planning for 

Fraternity Groups 



Have them taken at- 

McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 

44 State Street, Northampton, Mast. 



%il k l 



♦•KENNEL CLUB" NO MORE 
0u> AootC Institution Passu into 
Histoid . 
Another histoiical building of M. 
A. C. has disappeared from campus 
life. The "dog cart" for many yeitrs 
the chief hang-out about college was 
removed from its historic home dur- 
ing the summer to make place for a 
more commodious and artistic build- 
ing, "Aggie t Inn." Like Hrooks' 
Farm, the "dog cart" is rich in tradi- 
tion. Here have often gathered a 
motley crowd — sleepovcrs, rushing in 
to grab a sandwich or piece of pie on 
thcil way to morning classes ; heavy- 
euters. men wont to enjoy a frank- 
fort or bottle of tonic lietween meals. 
Here, loo, have come together volu- 
ble seers, "bull throwers," so called, 
who have discussed well the faculty, 
the studies and the problems of col- 
lege life. Nor was an occasional 
rough-house unusual in this historic 
old lunch. 

All has passed now, however. 
Today the "dog curt" stands at the 
Hadlev depot in all readiness for 
removal to Bridgeport, Conn. The 
history of this old quick luoch is in- 
teresting. The cart originally came 
from Lynn. From there some enter- 
prising man removed it to Amherst, 
where it adorned the town square for 
several years. Later, however, it 
was again shipped back to its old 
home. During the latter part of 1911 
Henry Allen and Webster Birdsall, 
both students at M. A. C. bought 
the cart from Walter Murphy of Lynn 
and brought it to the historic site at 
the entrance to the campus. Here a 
flourishing business was carried on 
for several years until the present 
owners, Danforth and McCulloch, 
saw fit to build a more commodious 
lunch room. The old "dog cart" is 
far from dead, however. Some day 
as you come up Main street in Bridge- 
port and turn up Railroad street you 
may stop and stand aghast, There, 
staring you in the face will be the old 
"dog cart", the very room in which 
you ate, gossiped, and rough-housed 
in yean gone by. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'U2.— C. Thornton Clark is u< 
Agricultural Adviser, WorcesU 
County Farm Bureau : address 1 1 
Foster 8t,, Worcester. 

'92.— Dr. Milton H. Williams i. - 
ceived some time ago a personal I 
ter from Governor Walsh congrat ,- 
lating him upon his standing Masoug 
the most successful of American eon 
raisers. Dr. Williams was appoint* >l 
by Charles F. Mills of Springfield. 
Ill , secretary of the National Top 
Notch Farmers' club, as one of the 
representatives of Massachusetts at 
the universal corn exposition at Sao 
Francisco on Aug. 5 and 6 in con- 
nection with the Panama Pacific 
exposition. 

'98.— Dr. Henry F. Staples hut 
built a new house and is now living 
8054 Somerton Road, Cleveland 
Heights, Ohio. 

'94. — Charles P. Lounsbury is ao« 
on his way east via Australia and will 
be in the I'nited States for several 
months. At present he is visiting 
the Pacific Coast. As chief of the 
division of entomology, Uttios De- 
partment of Agriculture, Cape Town. 
South Africa, he has been awardeil 
the Medal and Grant, for 1915, of 
the South African association for 
the advancement of Science. 

'99.— Capt W. II. Araatroafuoa 
at Fort Leavenworth, Kans., spent 
most of the summer in Amherst. 

'99.— Frederick S. Merrill writi - 
that he h living in a ••real stal-. 
K'insas, his address being Manhattan. 
'07.— H. P. Wood's aildics> is 
5112 Victor St., Dallas, Tex., with 
Bureau of Kntomology, l\ S. I). A. 
Kx-'07.— Edwin T. Deuham i> 
superintendent of a carnation grow 
ing establishment in Tewksbury 

MO — S. W. Mend it m is a consult- 
ing farm accountant, Billericu. 

MO.— Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Hmfonl 
Morey announce the innniageof tin n 
daughter Winnie Belle to Arthur \\ ill 
Holland, on Wednesday Aug. 18. 
At home after Nov. I. Holmau street, 
Shrewsbury. 

MO.— Mrs. Mary Adelaide Smith 
announces the marriage of her da tigh- 
ter Marion Rena to Albert KlrtclnT 
of Rockwood on Oct. 21, 1914, 
Boston. 

Ml. — Announcement has been 
received of the marriage of Henry H. 
Morse to Miss Marie Anna Yat s, 

Sept. 9. in the High Street Met I 

chapel, New Brunswick, N ' 
Address. Dean Academy, Franklin. 

'13.— Mr. and Mrs. H. A. .\ 
announced the birth of a datigh' r - 
Lorrain F., born May 13. 
Noves is research chemist and hafr 
teriologist at the Perdue Onlvct y 
Experiment Station, and was rec< 
elected to the honorary sciet 
society of Sigma Xi. 

M4.— LeilieK. Abbott was I 
ried to Miss Margret Grayson I '- 
ley, in the Emmanuel Episci «al 
church, Wakefield, Aug. 28. At 
home, Toiver Hill road, Brimfiel 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

[loiitinuril from |M»t{e U 
■hard, George Kittson Abiimlon 



1 i in 

i ml, Berber! u. 
I. wen, Arthur N. 
I wen, Usuries 8, 

i wer, Richard 



Need has 

Wollaston 
I.akeville 
Brain tree 

Mitoii, Raymond W, Krainintrluiiti 

-ham. Paul T. Leominster 

nmi, Ralph A. Vver 

ii inn. Kliol If. Wahan 

I .it, Henry J. West Somervi lie 

! rioii, Lee W. I'lainville 

( illiihan, John K. Dorchester 

< llalian, Vincent del'. Maiden 
i mi|>hell. Donald L. South Deerlield 
i ,i petiler. Hall IS. Hoinervile 
I tley. Harry G, West Newton 
i .troll, Olive E, Dorchester 
I --.idy, Morton II. Ktist Boston 
thrtdbourae, Joseph A.Oreal Harrington 
i lainller, Arthur L. Leominster 

I .1 pin, Frederick ('. (Jreentield 

I tne, Chester I. Melrose 

< hase, Malcolm Anieshiiry 

i iiishoim, Rohert i>. Boston 

k. Francis at. Oxford 

.hire. Emest .Soiithhridtze 

i.e. Holloway K. Rock bill, Conn, 
nla, Frederick K. South Portland, Ms. 

..Ilins, itoberl II. Rockland 

■ ...ley. Kdwin II. Sunderland 

nne, Wilis II. Miliiiiea«ue 

|..laiid. Raymond S. Hyde I'ark 

.why, Alfred T. Went Held 

mm ford. Aaron Greenfield 

immins, lloyee |). Bradford 

mwe, Charles Norwich, Conn. 

I > ivies, .lames 1*. Cjunhi idye 

I I iv, Klston A. Ntirthhridne 

Dbj , Harold R. Hopedals 

li.kitiKon, Victor A. Amherst 

li.tiitran, Henry J. Marion 
OnUgiaSS, Kllie I'aul 

i >'in^HHMtfa%a>i>. 

I hard. Miss Rena <L 
I i i.-kson. t iiiiinai K, 
I his. atj rton K. 

.■nf. Ambrose c, 

f iirinsftfin, Rohert P, 

Kaxoft, I'aul 

I i lows. Kal lierine A 

In Id. John R. 

I hi. Wilheri I). 

'•stein. Hyinati 
I •_•. Verne \ 
I ii Ii. Willard K. 
'• tie, Karl A. 
'• ' . Lawretn ••■ \\ 



i .it 



Amherxt 






Sutliehl. Conn. 

Riimtiehl 

Kant Roston 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

Rrockton 



Kinjf, William C. 

Kniiiht, Frank K. 

Kolpack, Harry W. 

Leavitt, John W. 

Liehman, Anna 

Logan, Milan A. 

Macdonalil, Harold R. liu/./.ards Ray 

Mahon, John J. New Canaan, Conn. 

Manscil, Klton J. Cambridge 

Martin, Chester W. Orange 

Maltoon, Charles S. 1'iilsliehl 

McCarthy, Arthur M. Monson 

Metiiven, Eugene A. Lynn 

Montgomery. Arthur B. Dedhani 

Montgomery, Forest K.Kust orau»e,N,.i. 

Mo<»r, Irwin c. Lynn 

Moore, J. Raymond Tolland 

Morgan, Karl A. Amherst 

Mono, Louis K. Jr. North Altleboro 

Morron, Klmer J. Walt ham 

M.iskowiU, Maurice Dorchester 

Muntoe. Raymond F. Fall River 

Newhold, UoUglaS T. Nolhaniptoii 

Newton. Raymond L. Maiden 

Ollara, Joseph K, Worcistct 

Parke. Rohert W. Wi in-hemloii 

I'arkhurst. Ravmo.l T. Fitchliuru' 

I'arsoiis, Ktlward F. North Ainhersl 

Peck, George N. Wilson. Conn. 

Peck, Roger K. Shelhurne 

Perry. Krrol C. Acushuel 

Peirson, iieiir> ii. Bradford 

Peterson. Lerov D. New Vork 

Pheniister, R <i. Provideii.e, It. I. 

Pierpont, P. T. < hcsler. Pa. 

Piatt, William B. Keotninnter 

Poml. Allan L. llollistoii 

Poole. Harold W. Iludmin 

Pree. Karl J. Rr.»oklilie 

Pulley. Mario Melrose 

Qolnby, \rthur K. West .somctvllle 

Kia. Julian S. Kawt Weymouth 

Reatlio. Roger Florence 
I!,.,.. Harold M. g * — *■■*" ■ flMM 
Rohert s, Mark A. 



GREETINGS ! 



"•can. (Jerald M. 
.in. William F. 
, How anl Mason 
res, Walter D. 
, . Harold F. 
<-n, Lynn 
nt, Nathan 
■i, Kmil F. 
.Iiin. Molvin W. 
i. Frank K 
iiitoti, Howard m 
■ is, Ethel Lomii 

well, Richard IC. 
'am, KrneriMiii F. 
1 lags, I .oiiU D. 
haway, Wilfred \ 
en, John A. 

•on. William J. 
,«*on, Benjamin ft 
ttgren. Rtebsrd s. 



R<»llnii«l 

l;i-l MI!!. .11 

Lynn 

West Somerville 

West Wat re n 

Nantucket 

West Newton 

Northampton 

Sharon 

Somerville 

Dorchester 

Topsliehl 

\\ otcester 

Lynn 

Crolon 

West Warren 

Wen ham 

Kveteit 

I '.took line 

'lowusetid llatlioi 

Schenevus, N. \ . 

Shertioi ii»' 

New Bedford 

Lynn 

Rockland 

Winchester 

Be verl y 

Hprlngneld 
Hyde I'ark 
Bprtagfleld 

launton 
Milford 

Bomervi lle 

Methiten 

Kasf Lynn 

(•rlean*. 




..urn. George R. L, 

e, Ralph T. Melnme Righlands 

laud, George It, Melrose Etlgbtaods 

Merrimac 
Avon 

I Jo* 1 1 in laic 



11. Charles A. 
■OK, Lawrence W. 
«, Kdson T. 
in, Raymiimi D, 
■j , Ken uef It C 
.<!>. Alan ti. 
r, Donald M. 



Hprinatield 
West Lynn 

Milford 

Wakelh-hl 



Schenie 
Seavc> . Paul 8. 

Beaton, Krnest F. 
Shi ililoii, Howard R 
Nihley. Helen A. 
Skinner. Kverell II. 

Small \s I. John II 

Smiih. J. II. 
Smith, Wendell f. 
Snow Palmer P. 
Spanldlim. II. K. 
Sjirout. Walter D. 
stafTord. Irving II. 

Stearns, Horace D. 

Htevens, Chestct D. 
Sioekbridg'e, John 8 
Siockw.dl. K. S.. Jr 
St rack, Kdwnrd 
Strong, Kdwart! It. 
Stuart, Vineetit C, 
Sweeney. William J 
Swift. Huhhard 



\ HvtrlVi 
Maiden 
Qulney 
Cainhrldice 

Dar'ten, (Jona 

Mill River 

Louuiueadow 

West I'plon 

Palerson, N. .1. 

1,'oslludalc 

Iroy, N. V. 

West Rarnslahle 

llopedale 

llaiiovcl 

Fall River 

Wall ham 

Reading 

Atlanta, Ha. 

Sharon 

I'l aminijham 
\ve. 

Newtiin 

Ihiehester 

West Falmontli 

Wollaaton 



Taylor. Kilmiiml II. 

Thayer, Julian R. Durham Center, Conn. 

Thayer, (Feaion C. Illnghatn 

Tfaomas, Haniei J. Twaets P»lli» 

Thomas, Prank D. Milford 

Tiet/,, HurrisoiiRichnioiid Hill. L.L.N.V. 
'I'irrell, [.oriutf V. Molttfa Weytnoiith 



Waile. Hie hard A. 
Wells. Marion \ 
Wheeler. Russell II 

White, Edward A. 
White, fieorge I, 

Whittle, Clarence P. 
Wilder, chaster H. 
Williams, Allan C 
Williams. Kenneth S. 
Willis, Howard f , 
Window, James 
Window, Thomas 
Winu, A rlaud J. 

Wisweii. Raj Herbert 
Wood, Ernest P. 
Wood, Oliver W. 

WiMMlward, Chestct s 

Woodbury, Ray W, 

Woods, Frank A. 
Woodside, Wilfred L. 
Wright, Uvingntmi 



Ml.hllehchl 

Springfield 

New tow ti. Conn. 

Providence, It. I . 

vanlJeusriiville 

Weymrtui h 

Springfield 

ICocklnnd 

Sutiderlatid 

Amherst 

Lynn 

Lynn 

Hawthorne 

Northampton 

Mendon 

Arliiigtnn 

leveret t 

Newhnryport 

flroton 

A n Inn n. la le 

Quincy 




Let us help you to start right — You will find our store full of the 

best there is to be had in 

READY CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 

of all kinds, ami the 

... PRICES ARE RIGHT ... 



Not the ordinary college town prices. We have a reputation of 
thirty years of value giving — Come in ami get acquainted. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



' mg are ■ - 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1857 V& w I^J9^V'Wtgt 1915 



Your Opportunity 

The editor of one el our leading agricul- 
tural papers writes us under date of January 
12th, l9l5.a*ioflow.:- 

"1 am doing all I can to induce farmer* to 
plant gran crops this year. 

Grain u very high and it U going higher. 
WheatU going to $2.00 per bushel and other 
Brains will share in the advance. Wheat costs 
$2.50 per 100 pounds now, and pound for 
pound oafs cost as much. 

"Ii reems to me that the eastern farmer'* 
salvation is to buy plant food and grow 
CORN, WHEAT, BARLEY, 
OATS AND BUCKWHEAT 

"Last fall I doubled my acreage of waiter 
wheat and thai *prmg I ahal triple the acreage 
of oafs. I managed to produce 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre, and sold the straw at 
$1 7.00 per ton hi the bam." 

THE OrTOsHVmTY IS YOURS! 

Ba SSM that you buy 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 






the most 
vigor- 



V 



They are svsUsble plant fends that mote than meet thj 
exacting requirements, giving plump, sound, full heads of grain and 
ous, healthy straw. ft 

Eastern users of E. Frank Coe Fertilizers are raising 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre. The average for Ae United States for three years 
is 1 4 iV bushels to the sere. 

1T1E0f»RW1VWrYrSY0IJRSI WILL YOU WAKE THE IHOST OPIT? 

The Coe-Mortimer Company, SI Chambers St, N. Y. 



iy 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 21 ,1915. 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

i\«i«Hoc.ite.«i over prist office. Up one (tight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specially 

Liberal Ticket System Til J6-M 

OP. AfllE&NTKA. 

SHOE STOKE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday from 7*1*. On your way to P. O. 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is a modern hos- 
telry run on the European Flan. It is just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices »l and up; rooms 
with bath (single) •! .50 and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
loom makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening, 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swans 

Waterman's 



Thirty-six dozen pens to select fr 



< n. 



Highland Hotel, 



spring He 1.1, Mac*. 




Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



OUR RULE 

"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



WKNKKDIT HOOK AOKNTH. 

Both sexes, for best seller published. Particulut 

and outfit free. 
(1KO. W. MIMKKH, 1-S, St. AiignMlne. Kl». 



RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 



AMHERST FURNITURE 




COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 

Joiut Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 
M. A. C. Athletic Field Association, 
The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball AsdociuUou, • 

f ieua A ss ociatio n, 




<; 



E. D. MARSH ESTATE 

IST COX SONS 

JHH, VINING 

72-74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

J7 Main St, Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Cfi*tmJt trmm 1 A. M *> 4 A M 



Roister Doisters, 
Musical Association, 
Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 
Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 
M. A. C Christian Asswiation, 
M. A. C. Catholic Club, 
Fraternity Conference, 
Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
It. Chapman, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
S. VV. Hall, Piesident 

C. W. Moses, Mauager 
VV. Spaulding, Mauager 
V. A. Ricker, Manager 
tiBtiugton, Jr., Ainu agar 
HM» . tttsJWBN Maaajorj 

. „ )'i— ins*; 

.1. T. Nwbotota, Manager 

F. A'. Anderson, Manager 

L. E. Fielding, Manager 

F. W. Mayo, Manager 

A. J. Hicks, President 

J. E. Harper, President 

C. H. Gould, President 

K. F. Taber, President 



Che Pheasant 

Bmtto. 5t. f Bmberat 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for. 

Telephone 470 

Rooms for Traoj^eg^ 




There are Se»«n (Jood K'iwi« whv vmnliould 
buy your 



COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



RAHAR'S INN 



mo*t th* imroT 



The hotel where there is comfort (with 

out extravagance.) More popular 

than ever. 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatrtelds, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody I'.rook battle ground 
to Old Deer field, thence to Green- 
held, Turners Falls and across the 
" Plains " 10 Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Miles of Trackage riodern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System - Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line . 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 

Comoany 




Leave AOQIE COLLEGE 
YOKE at 15 min. past the 



rtoi- 



CARS 



LanctMon 12—1 P. M. 

PRIVATE DININC ROOMS 

A la Carte Service 
ft-JO to 11 P.M. 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL* 
LEUE at 7 and 37 mln. past the hour. 

Mm 



MHERST t SUNDERLAND ST. II. CO 



Jacob Reed's S 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 
1494-1426 Chcitnut St., 



ONS, 



Pa. 



tut -r*si»i*smTr- **AS»t.«»»* 

(iKun-ln- ITrnnln* Repairing 

<iul«keff4 n-nli*, HMt Work, l,«w«-.i l*rlr- 

All »oi* carefully doa*. Wort called fo» *"d 
drliTered. G«nU* overcoats, -«ta. ■»**» «" 

costs. Ladies* tin* linen suits 1 specialty 
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THE 

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616 Cheetnut St.. Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversm is, 
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PtMMMpMi's Officii! Fritifiltj Jev 
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Fraternity Badges, FehS, %W*vm 
Rings, Charms ...... Prises, Tm " 

Medals .College Pins, Feb*, «■'• 

Rings, Charms .-. .*, 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, September 28, 1915. 



No. 2 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNIVERSARY 
TO BE CELEBRATED OCT. 2 

Opening of Stockbridge Hall One of 

Chief Features of Interesting 

Program. 

The forty-eight anniversary of the 
opening of the college will be cele- 
lirated on Saturday, Oct. 2nd, with 
appropriate festivities. Beginning 
:it 3 in the afternoon with the Stock- 
luidge Cluli "stunts" and the big 
liarbecue, the program will continue 
throughout the evening. The event 
of most general interest to the stu- 
< If nt body, however, will be the 
opening fur the first time of Stock- 

' ridge Hall, the beautiful and sub- 
stantial new agricultural building. 
I lie time from 6-30 to 8 o'clock will 
he taken up with a general inspection 
of the new building by students and 
faculty. 

At 8 o'clock a short program will 
he carried out in the auditorium, 
I 'resident Butterfield presiding. Brief 
remarks wUl be made by Pro- 
fessor Ford and President But- 
terfield. Music will be furnished by 
the college orchestra and the Glee 
< lull, and it is planned to have the 
Dramatic Club put on a short play. 
I he student body is urged to join 
with the faculty in making the Anni- 
versary Day a memorable one in the 
history of the college. 



HARVARD TO BE PLAYED 

IN STADIUM SATURDAY 

Aggie Meets with Strong Crimson 

Eleven for the First Time in 

History. 

For the first time in the history of 
the college, the Maroon and White 
football team will play the foremost 
team in the country, Harvard, at the 
Harvard Stadium, Saturday. Coach 
Percy Houghton of the Crimson has 
won widespread fame during the past 
few years by developing a team 
which has met all comers and suffered 
no defeats. This year's team seems 
to be no exception, nearly every de- 
partment having already been whip- 
ped iuto shape. Especially so is the 
Crimson's offense, Captain Mahan, 
Watson, McKinlock, King and Ku- 
wright making an undatable combin- 
ation for a backfield. Captain Ma- 
ban is especially brilliant and fast, 
and is looked upon by many as the 
backbone of the Harvard gridiron 
machine. *lhe Ils*-vaid defense, 
however, is not up to form, aid rs 
sure to And trouble in the new Aggie 
backfield. 

The Maroon and White will prove 
a bard proposition to the Harvard 
eleven. With Captain I urran and 
Weeks in the backfield, Aggie's of- 
fense is strengthened fifty per cent. 
Since "Doc" Brides has been coach 



COLLEGE Y.M.C.A. PROPOSES 
NEW SYSTEM OF MEMBERSHIP 



itillllP'l Wll 



*1 



ALL FOUR CLASSES HOLD 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

' Mficers for the first semester of 
1 H5-16 have been elected by all four 
>lasses during the week. The com- 
i lett list follow*; 

MM C— President. Charles H. Gould 
■ -f Worcester; vice-president, Henry 
M. Walker of Brooklme ; secretary, 
Matfd Potter of Concord ; treasurer, 
n&ytoiiM. Hager of Winter Hill; 

I >tain, Homer C. Darling of Men- 
•11; sergeant-at-arms, Clayton W. 

ash of South Wry mouth ; historian, 
William E. Ryan, Jr. of Htoughton. 

1917— President, J. Dixon Bfreb- 

I of Springfield; vice-president, 

ilford R. Laurence of Falmouth; 

retary, John S. Diserof Kast Wey- 

1 "nith ; treasurer, William W. 

1 'layer of SomerviUe ; captain, Hans 

a, Rorstrom of Boston ; sergeant-at- 
fns. Frank C. Webster of Harvard ; 

1 -tori an, Richmond M. Jackson of 

I "orgetown. 



CLASS STATISTICS 

Enrollment Somewhat Larger Than 
That of Last Tear. 
The full enrollment of the college 
under date of Sept. 22nd is as fol- 
lows: 



Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

Unclassified 

Graduate 



MM.'. 

1 br- 
io* 

MM 
M 
15 



MM I 

108 

113 

\\2 

160 

N 

51 



No Stated Fee to be Collected but All 

Students Can Join by Signifying 

Intention. 

Breaking from the former policy 
of " pay as you enter," the Associa- 
tion wishes to announce an entirely 
new basis of membership. Each 
M. A. Ci student, who is a member 
of an evangelical cbnrcb, is eligible, 
and is cordially invited to become an 
active member of the organization. 
All other men are aBked to join as 
associate members. 

The coming year promises to be 
an unusually successful one for the 
Association. The season opens with 
the Seerley lectures, and many more 
good things are to follow. A list of 
the office hours of the cabinet mem- 
bers is posted upon the Y. M. C A. 
bulletin board, and the men who 
signed the slips last Thursday even- 
ing are asked to call during those 
boss to redec-.u, thrr pledges and 
receive membership cards. 



INTERCLASS CROSS COUHTRY 

Few but Seniors and Freshmen Out 

for Distance Bona. 

The time is drawing near when 
there will be held the annual inter- 
class cross country run. So far the 
prospects for an even moderately 
even contest are not st all bright. 
With one or two exceptions, all the 
men out for cross country are either 
seniors or freshmen. Captain Run- 
sell of the varsity track team urges 
all men who have any ability at all 
in this line to come out and see whst 
they can do. 



[t ontlnut* «l on OS** il J 



f,31 610 

A glance at the foregoing table 
will show that the greatest increase 
has occurred in the case of the Fresh- 
man class which has forty more mem- 
bers than last yesr. The class of 
1917 shows the most appalling mor- 
tality rate of all the classes. Start- 
ing off with a class of 200 Freshmen 
in 1018, this fell in one year to HS 
and now the present Junior class has 
but 108 members. 



AGGIE LOSES TO DARTMOUTH 
IN HARD FOUGHT CONTEST 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

"Friendliness" Chosen as Watchword 
of the Hew College Year. 

1'resident Butterfield sddressed the 
student body at the Wednesday as- 
sembly, taking as his subject the 
watchword of the year, Friendliness, 
and speaking forcefully upon the 
importance and application of this 
term to the various phases of college 
life. Fie pointed out the opportu- 
nities for friendship between class- 
mates, between classes, between all 
college students, and finally between 
the student body and the faculty, and 
gave illustrations from act mil condi- 
tion's at Massachusetts In many in- 
stances. 



Score 13-0, All Points Being Made In 

First Half. Longer Practice Helps 

the Green Win. 

Two weeks more practice tells the 
story of the 13 to victory scored 
by Dartmouth over Massachusetts 
Aggies Saturday. Roth of the Dart- 
mouth touchdowns came in the first 
twelve minutes of play and after that 
time the Maroon team distinctly out- 
played the wearers of the Green. 
Speedy bucks that slid off the tackles 
were the plays that accounted for the 
scores and after they had been stop- 
ped, the home team was unable to 
gain. Dartmouth was successful In 
the use of the forward pass only once 
while the Aggies threw five for gains 
of from ten to twenty yards. Palmer 
outpuntcd his Dartmouth opponents 
on every exchange of kicks and made 
one try for a dropkick from the forty 
yard line that fell just short of being 
a goal. 

While Hie visitors lacked team 
work they showed up well at times on 
end runs by Darling and line books 
by Curran. Day and Grayson played 
well on the ends and Dartmouth was 
only able to gain once by circling 
them. The line from tackle to tackle 
was where most of the Dartmouth 
gains were made but in the second 
half it braced and held the big green 
line in check at all times. Palmer 
ran the team at the start and later 
Murphy went In at quarter and 
Palmer took Weeks' place at fullback. 
Dartmouth started Its regular taen. 
and atuck pretty close to the same 
lineup all through the first half, but 
put In a few subs in the second part. 
< rerrish played the best game of any 
of the Dartmouth backfield men mak- 
ing several spectacular runs through 
the line* Time was taken out for 
injuries ouly once during the contest, 
Duhamel being knocked out and 
forced to leave the game. All of the 
Aggie team finished the contest in 
good condition. 

Captain Cut ran won the toss and 
chose to defend the south goal wiih 
the sun at his back. Dartmouth 
kicked off to Day who fumbled and 
fell on the Ml on the thirty yard line. 
Two line plays failed to gain and 
Palmer punted to Holbrook on the 
forty yard line. Four penalties for 
offside playing gave' Dartmouth 
twenty yards at this point and paved 
the way for a touchdown. Successive 





► I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 28, 1915. 



i 



plays at guard aud tackle brought the 
ball down to the ten yard line and 
Hoi brook made four yards. Gerrisb 
took the ball over on the nest play 
aud Purdith failed to kick the goal. 
Dartmouth kicked to Palmer who 
ran the ball back to his forty-two 
yard line before he was downed. 
Two plays failed to gain and on the 
next play Curran fumbled aud the 
ball went to Dartmouth. After mak- 
ing first down the quarter ended with 
the ball in Dartmouth's possession on 
Aggie's teu yard line. 

SK(JONI) QUARTER. 

In two plays Duhamel took the 
ball over for a touchdown and Purdith 
kicked the goal. Palmer kicked off 
to Dartmouth on the ten yard line. 
Switzer went in at this point for Hol- 
hrook and made two yards and then 
Dartmouth punted to Palmer who 
ill naik'd in his tracks. Murphy 
went in for Palmar and Palmer took 
Weeks' place at full. Palmer punted 
ami (lerrish made six yards for the 
Green and after two rushes a forward 
pass to Purdith was good for tweuty- 
five yards. On the one yard line 
Dartmouth was penalized 15 yards 
for holding on the part of Barrows 
and the ball went to Aggie on downs. 
Palmer panted to Switzer and the 
half ended with ball in the possession 
of Dartmouth on their own forty yard 
line. 

IIIIKO VUARTKK. 

When the Aggie team came back 
for the second half they showed con- 
siderably more of a lighting spirit 
thnu thev did in the first of the game. 
Palmer kicked off and (lerrish brought 
the ball back to the forty yard line 
before he wan downed. Failing to 
gain, Dartmouth punted to Darling 
and ( 'uri an made three and then four 
more yards on skin tackle plays. A 
erihn M OM failed to work anil Palmer 
punted. Day nailed (lerrish as he 
caught the ball aud tdiook him up 
with a terrilii' tackle. Duhamel 
was laid out and retired on the same 
play- Dartmouth was offside and 
punted. Palmer made a yard and 
tlu-n a forward pass fiom Palmer to 
Curran netted six yards. Palmer 
made a yard but Cm ran rould not 
gain and a forward pass failed. 
Palmer dropped bmk to the forty- 
two yard line and attempted a drop 
kick that hit one of the uprights. 
Dartmouth punted from the twenty 
yard line and on the first play a fum- 
ble gave tin* halt to Dartmouth again. 
Mi'Donoiigh got fifteen yards on an 
end run and (lerrish repeated. 

lolWIJI m'AHTEK. 

Fishback went in for Cotton and 
thr bitter took Thielschei's place at 
fullback. Unrtiiioiith's fumble was 

recovered by Murphy for a tonehbaok 

and on the next play Curran recov- 
ered hix OWa fumble and on the next 
he in ovcrcd Darling's for a six yard 
gala. Ciiii.in made it first down and 
made itX <>n the next play. A for- 
ward pass, Palmer to Curran gained 



another first down. Failing to gain 
Palmer attempted to punt and a Dart- 
mouth man was offside and blocked the 
kick which was recovered by Murphy 
so the penalty was refused. Dartmouth 
was offside and Darling made first 
down on the forty forty yard line. A 
forward pass Palmer to Day gained 
first dowu on the thirty yard line but 
at this point Dartmouth held for 
downs and the game ended. 

The summary : 
n.usTMorru. M. a. <•. 

Montgomery, ) 

KaHtiiuin, [ le re, Day 

Burns, j 

UoAullffe, OuKiui'KHn, It it, Deoforth 

Merrill, lg rg, Dunn, Perry 

Baxter, <iile, o e. Yerlieek. ferry 

BpflSn, Harrows, ry Iff, Jordan 

CotteO, Kishliaek, rt It, Plainteil 

Purdith, Soul li:as, re le, llraysnn.MeKee 

Holbrook, 



Hoi brook, i 

.Switzer. 

McDonoagb, > 



qb 



liner, 



, } fa I 

<i u '( Murphy 

Diitiainel. Caroleo, rlili rlih, Ciinaii 

Oerriult, Ihb rhh, Darling 

Tlii.-lsclier, ( oil. .n. fh fl». I'almer, Weeks 
Set ire — Dartmouth 18, Massaelnisitts 
(I. Touehdowiis — lii'ii isli, iMihumel. 
Goal from Touchdown— Purdith. t'm- 
|.ire — Hurleiirli. Id-IVm- — Mel J rath. 

Linesman — Courtney. Slaw— Two 10 

;i in I two M minute periods. 



NEW PROFESSOR OF 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Prof. McNutt Appointed to Succeed 
Prof. McLean, Resigned 
John C. McNutt has been ap- 
pointed professor of animal hus- 
bandry at the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural college to succeed Prof. John 
A. McLean who recently resigned. 
Mr. McNutt was horn and reared on 
a farm in Ohio, and took the two- 
yenr course and the regular course in 
agriculture at the Ohio State I niver- 
sity, receiving the degree of Bachelor 
of Science from that institution in 
1907. For a year after leaving col- 
lege he was manager of the dairy 
herd at the llartman stock farm at 
Columbus, Ohio. From 1 i>08 to 1910 
he taught animal Husbandry at the 
New Hampshire State college, and 
the pant four years has been professor 
of animal husbandry at the North 
Carolina College of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts. While in college 
Mr. McNutt specialized in animal 
husbandry, and on various occasions 
won distinction as a judge of live- 
stock. While at the New Hampshire 
Agricultural college he was particu- 
larly successful in training student 
stock judging teams, and this has 
been followed by equally conspicuous 
success at North Carolina. Mr. 
McNutt taught at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College Summer school 
in lit 10, and at that time made a 
very favorable impression upon stu- 
dents and faculty alike. It appear* 
! that Professor McNutt has had the 
training and experience which should 
lead htm to develop the work of ani- 
mal husbandry in Massachusetts in a 
most gratifying manner. 



'16. — I. B. Lincoln was a visitor 

about college today. 



PROSPECTS BRIGHT FOR 

FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 

Season opens Saturday with Oame 
at Suffield against 0. L. I. 

Freshman football practice has 
been carried on in earnest during the 
past week in preparation for the 
opening game with the Connecticut 
Literary Institute at Suffield Satur- 
day. Though the squad has greatly 
decreased there are still 20 good men 
out for the team. Friday afternoon 
they were able to hold the second 
team to a to score in a fast scrim- 
mage. In view of the fact that five 
of the men have never played football 
before, such prospects look bright. 
The team is fairly heavy, the men 
fast. All that is needed to round 
out a fast squad is practice. 

For the center position there are 
two men out, Smallwood and Sexton. 
Among the guards are Krnest Wood, 
Piatt, Bond and Snow ; the tackles 
Oliver Wood, Bartlelt and Blanchard. 
Manscll, Whittle, Chisholm, Williams 
and Cooley are trying for the ends. 
Backfield men are C.ay, Pool, Pond 
and MacDonald. (Quarterback lies 
between Whittle and Readio. Wed- 
nesday afternoon the squad will play 
a game with Amherst High. 

The Fresh mau schedule is as 
follows : 

Oct. •_', Conn. Literary Institute at 
Suflleld. 
i>, Williston at Kasthampton. 
1(5, Chicopee High at Amherst. 
:?.'i, Deertield academy at Am- 
herst. 
Mi M on son academy at Mouson. 



BIBLE CLASSES FORMED 

Prof. Mackimmie and Local Pastors 
Join in Effort to Interest Men 

Professor Anderson Mackimmie 
will conduct a Bible class for college 
men at ttre North Amherst Congrega- 
ti.iual church, beginning this Sunday, 
Oct. Brd. The text used will be 
"The Manhood of the Master," by 
Harry Fosdick. Professor Mackim- 
mie wishes to extend a cordial iuvita- 
tiou to all Aggie men living at North 
Amherst to attend the class. 

Rev. Mr. Tuttle of the Fast Street 
Congregational church has also 
started a Bible class in which he 
hopes to interest some of the men of 
M. A. C. Rev. S. P. Jefferson is to 
conduct a similar class at the Baptist 
church, while at the Methodist church 
a class has already been started 
under the leadership of Professor 
Morgan and Mr. (iambil. The 
Crane class at the First church will 
continue this year as before, led by 
men prominent in the life of the 
town and of the two colleges. The 
men of M. A. C. are thus offered 
this year an opportunity to join with 
other men of their kind in the discus- 
sion of topics iu which every think- 
ing man is sure to find himself more 
or leas interested. 



'15. — Perry and MncNeil are grad- 
uate assistants in chemistry at 
M. A. C. 



FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT 

Aggie to Line-up Againct Strom 
Harvard Eleven. 

[Continued frmn pSS* 1] 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 28, 1915. 



at Aggie, the Maroon and White ha 
had a wonderful defense, but ha 
been rather weak iu the offense. 1 
is in the line that Aggie's weak 
ness now lies. The holes left by 
Dole '15 and Captain Curran are 
proving dillicult to fill. The Maroon 
and White, however, places its hopr 
in Coach Brides, who surely will de 
velop some green recruits aud makr 
a hard-fighting defense before Sat 
urday's game. The Aggie men are 
confident of scoring on the husky 
Harvard team, besides being deter- 
mined to keep down the opponent's 
score to a minimum. 

The Harvard line-up will probably 
be : Soucy le, Parson It, Duncan Ig. 
Wiggin c, Cowen rg, Bigelow rt. 
Coolidge re, Watson qb, Mahau Ihb. 
King rhb, McKnlock, Enwright fb. 



CLASS ELECTIONS 

[Continued from i>.ik<- 1] 



1918— President, Frank M. Bab 
bitt of Fairhaven ; vice-president, 
Sidney S. Smith of Boston ; secreta- 
ry, Marshall O. Lanphear of Wind- 
sor, Conn. ; treasurer, Harlan N . 
Worthley of Greenwood, (re-elected) ; 
captain, Stephen M. Richardson of 
Marlboro; sergeant-at-arms, Robert 
P. Holmes of Wakefield ; historian, 
Harold F. Jones of New Canaan. 
Conn. 

1919— President, Donald Ross of 
Arlington ; vice-president, Lawrence 
W, Gay of Groton ; secretary, Rob- 
ert D. Chisholm of Melrose ; treas- 
urer, Vincent C. Stuart of Newton ; 
captain. Roger Readio of Florence ; 
sergeant-at.arras, Farl A. Morgan of 
Amherst; historian, Wilfred A. 
Hathaway of Taunton. 



COUNTRY LIFE CLUB 

HAS FIRST MEETING 

Discusses Plans and Prospects for 
the Coming Tear. 

The first meeting of the Country 
Life Club this year was held in Room 
(>. South College, Wednesday e\ 
log, Sept. 22. Those of hut year * 
members remaining in college turue I 
out in good numbers, the meeting 
taking the form of a general discu- 
sion of plans for the coming year. 

A program committee, with Prof. 
Morgan at its head, is now at work 
and an interesting schedule of meet- 
ings is to be arranged. These meet 
ings will be held bi-weekly, begin- 
ning the middle of October. All 
students and faculty interested iu 
country life are cordially invited 
attend these meetings. It Is es- 
pecially desired that men of U 
Sophomore and Freshmen cla*» 
take advantage of this opportune 
to acquaint themselves with the cu- 
rent questions of country life in < 
United States. A complete sehedul" 
of proposed meetings will appear a 
the Collegian soon. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Work is progressing rapidly on the 
new addition to the college heating 
and lighting plant. The brick work 
on the structure itself is already 
nearly complete, and excavation has 
been started for a new and greatly 
enlarged coal pocket. 

At last the pond is to have a much 
needed fall cleaning out. The water 
has been all draw off and several men 
are busy shoveling out mud and silt 
from the upper end. Most of this 
material which has clogged up the 
stream at the bridge was washed 
down from the athletic field. 
The September number of the 
\merican City contains a study for a 
rural neighborhood center written by 
Prof. F. A. Waugh. This work 
was prepared by the extension ser- 
vice in civic improvement and shows 
a complete design for a neighborhood 
center in Sterling. This includes 
park, public buildings, outdoor 
theater, playgrounds, schoolgrounds, 
railway traffic grounds aud civic cen- 
ter, etc. 

DR. SEERLEY SPEAKS 

First of Lecture Series Given Thurs- 
day Night. More to Follow. 

Dr. Seerley of Springfield Y. M. 
C. A. College gave his first of a 
series of six lectures on "The Psy- 
chology of the Sex Question, in the 
chapel, Thursday evening. A large 
number of students, consisting for 
the most part of Freshmen attended, 
and heard a very interesting general 
discussion of the subject. 



NEW GREENHOUSE 
A new greenhouse for the Agron- 
omy Department, is rapidly nearing 
completion. Located just west of the 
Agricultural building, it occupies a 
convenient site and will be of consid 
crable value in the conducting of pot 
• x peri men tsaod in sophomore labora- 
tory work in agronomy. As soon as 
connection can be made with the heat 
and light plant, work will be com- 
menced with grasses, legumes, and 
forage plants, Graduate students 
and seniors specialising in soil fertility 
will have opportunity to use the equip- 
ment ; it Is expected that some of the 
-indents will make a complete series 
f pot experiments, using soils col- 
. ted from different parts of the 
.te. The greenhouse is twenty- 
•iii- by thirty-three feet in its dimen- 
•us. Hittinger Co. is in charge of 
I work. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

**DextrogermJlorm," a new clis- 

»very of a Plymouth man, is 

laimed to he a sore cure for all the 

!» of fruit trees, and the discoverer 

now trying his hand at renovating 

me of "the trees In the young Clark 

chard, under the supervision of the 

mjotegy department. The reaults 

his experiments will be watched 

th interest by many New England 

nit growers. 



EXTENSION INSTRUCTOR 

IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Miss Marie Sayles has been ap- 
pointed extension instructor in home 
economics at the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural college. Miss Sayles at- 
tended the Michigan Agricultural 
college, is a graduate of the Kala- 
mazoo Michigan Normal school and 
has attended Teachers' College in 
New York city. She has taught 
home economics at the Kalamazoo 
Michigan Normal school, has been 
supervisor of cookery and sewing in 
Flint, Mich., and has taught home 
economics in the Lewiston Idaho 
Normal school. Miss Sayles suc- 
cess Msss Harriet J. Hopkins, who 
resigned recently to become head of 
the department of home economics at 
the University of Oklahoma. 



NEW MEN IN COLLEGE 

In addition to the names published 
in last week's CoiXKGlAX the follow- 
ing new men are enrolled in regular 
four year work. 

1917— Meiniiiiirer. loswsll W. Williams* 
port. Pa. 
Il.vile, Nt;iule> \\ . Maiden 

Merchant. Horace O. Cambridge 

W'lleux, TintOth) I'. ex-' HI 
litis Dunn. Arthur P. e\-'l7 

Jepskjr, A lir.'ihiiui. Easl Boston 
m.i\ nlhaa, Patrick J. Holyoke 

< » 'Hi-inn. I'lanris .1. EaSi Milton 

llu|i|i. i.ii\\;nil W. Albany, V V. 
Sehwari/.. Loots, e\ in 
l'.M'.i— Uailey. William. \\ illiaiuMiiwii, 
North knthsral 
Huyce, Man I'.. KellDSS, 1 I'.akei 

I I :»••- 

I ii-.im.iiiiI. Tl as \\ .. l;aniliil|di. 

•i Baker Pie i 
Flake, Buataee B., Baaiervllle, 70 

Pleasant 

Harding, Ueoiw w . Bonervltle, 

I I MiHlinu Avenue 

Loehladsa, tfbartlaoa W., Bpi 
Held, ii7 Pleasant 
,\ \s Beadle, Herbert 

Wrluht. .Nil.n L 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF 
AGRICULTURE 
The G ra d ua te School of Agricul- 
ture will be held at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College in the summer of 
1916, This school is held every two 
years at some agricultural college. 
It is conducted under the auspices of 
the Association of American Agri- 
cultural colleges and experiment 
stations, The purpose of the gradu- 
ate school is to offer advanced courses 
in agriculture and allied sciences to 
teachers, experiment station work- 
ers, snd others engaged in educational 
and research work in agriculture. 
The best teachers awl agricultural 
leaders in this and foreign countries 
are sought to have charge of the 
work of the Graduate school. Only 
preliminary plans for the school have 
as yet been made, 

'15, — George P. Potter was mar- 
ried Aug. 4 to Miss Ktilli E. Hans- 
com of Newburyporl. They will 
make their home in Ludlow where 
Mr. Potter is managing a farm. 



TRIVIAL TOPICS 

A lake, says Thoreau, is earth's 
eye, and the nodding grasses on the 
shore are its eyelids. We wonder 
what he would say about the college 
poud. He would have to strain him- 
self, if he set out to be poetic on 
such a subject. From a tolerable 
distance, the pond is decidelv beau- 
tiful ; with its Bomber slime and its 
weeping willows it somehow contrives 
to maintain an air of melancholy. 
Hut ns one approaches nearer, the 
air of melancholy is supplauted by 
quite a different kind of an air. and 
the casual observer is moved to think 
of glue factories, lush canneries and 
gas warfare. Someone of the faculty 
has said that the pond is the most 
conspicuous object on the campus. 
That is quite true, when the wind 
is blowing the right way. Are we 
going to allow this sort of thing to 
continue indefinitely? Are we going 
to allow our cherished pond to stag- 
nate, and fester and put reify, without 
taking measures to correct the evil ? 
A correspondent suggests stocking 
the water with minnows. Lord bless 
us ! Minnows couldn't clean up 
that | H unl. It would take sharks to 
do it. 



An Especially timul Commission Prununit Ion— 

Casli for tost orders— Article widely AflWtiwd— 
Cuts down BX| l'msi- in powci i lanti— Adilirsi 
Hni.inki'.hini. Scitiv Co., 2*?8 N. cjth street, 
Philadelphia, I'.i 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of WroiiK'it Iron and lliass 1'ipe, Valves 
ind FittiriKS for Steam. Wntei and Gai, Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, I'ipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Wstei Heating, 
Automatic Sprinklei Systems, IJoilei end Rngire 
Connections, Holyoke, Mess. 



f**»SB)e>i"v«»<f for 



BECKMAN 



Hump 1 * 



" BIDE-A-WEE 



M 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty — And other gfted things to cat. 

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Middle Street, 1 1. id lev, Mass. 

Tel. 415 W 

DR. R. C. BANGS 

Dentist 

NASH'S BLOCK 

Evenings by ApiKsinlnient. 

hold Ularrcn 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T. *l. AHERN. MANACCR 



ft\ J ^ are supplied every year 

Duroee s deeds ,iiratt,,m,,rcAi,,cn - 

m can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality " Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
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is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

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F*«tt:e f «p 8hoe Store 



IS- 



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Buy your nest pair of shoes here. 

s\VR MONEY AND GET REAL SHOE SATlsi Ml ION. 



Korher " Rubber Soles and Heels sat on for $1.75 double wear. 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOCXLLK; 5 a Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Had ley, Mass. 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 H road way. 

New York Cfty 



Thete Studios offer ihe bent skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 








•DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 28, 191 5. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. a8, 19 15. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published .-vfiy Tuesday evening 
by the students el the il ea— o hu- 
setts Affricultural Coiled*. 



LiOAUD <»K editors. 

KiHtnr-ln-Thlef 
Miinatcinu Kditor 

\ — 1 — IJ. ■•! I.llil"! 



TV I. IK S. ROttEBB li., 
RICHARD W. SMITH M7. 
FRANK .1, H< TIKI KKI.K'lr, 
TIIOS. 1.. IIARRIX'KSMH, 
AI.FRKN A.UKUOSA '1B, 
DwTOHT f, BARNS* Tti. 
MlLFOKD II. I.AWICKMK'l 



Athletic Kditor 

Athletic Kilitur 

Alumni Kditor 

Newa Kditor 



ELLIOT IIKNKKIISOS '17, DfiKirtnifiit Kditor 
WIU.IAM SAVH.I.K. .III. T7, < aiiiimr* Kililc.r 
11 \ 1:1 >l.l> K. .IONKH TK. Associate Killtor 

MARSHALL O. I.AMTIKAK Ms. Aatt'S Kditor 



BUSINESS DKI'A BTM BKT. 

(HAS. A. HI NTINt;TON..IIS.T<i. 

Btuiness Manaifi-r 
MKRRII.I. I'. WAKNKR 17. 

Assistant Itusliifss Mummer 
l.KSTKR K. riKLOlXCI 'M, 

Aclwiiihiim Manau'ci 
.IAMK8C l-OWKU.'lH. < ii.iilution 



Bnbferiptioa $i.r>o pet year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble U) I'll Altl.KS A. lltM 'IXliTii.V, Jit. 



Kntered us second-class mutter at the Amherst 
I'ost Office. 



Vol. XXVI. Tuesday, Sept. 28. No. 2 



The real Aggie spirit was surely 
abroad in tbe land wben the team left 
for Dartmouth last Friday. Every 
man from senior to freshman was 
marching in that column of loyal 
rooters who went to cheer the team 
to victory. That is the kind of col- 
lege spirit which we could well afford 
to see more of and which does more to 
"Boost Old Aggie" than any number 
of mass meetings. This first send-off 
of the year was a success from every 
standpoint. No one can tell what 
such support means to the team but 
it is safe to say that they are always 
ready to light just a little bit harder 
when they know the whole college, to 
a man, is behind them. We have 
started well with Dartmouth. The 
team came through in good shape, 
and Saturday they play Harvard. 
They need all we can give them. 
Why not give them another send-off 
even better than the first. 



remains unchanged. No entering 
class, unless of exceptional size and 
vigor, can be sufliciently well organ- 
ized during the first ten days of its 
college life to bring about that co- 
operation which is invaluable if at 
least seventy-five per cent, of its 
members are to be gathered together 
at any hour of day or night. This 
brings up two suggestions ; first, 
reduce the required percentage of at 
tendance decidedly ; second, postpone 
the season of picture taking until 
later in the year. Both have argu- 
ments pro and con, but it seems to be 
the concensus of opinion that the first 
is absolutely necessary if the picture 
contest is to be made a more evenly 
matched affair. 

The idea of having the picture taken 
anywhere within stated limits on cam- 
pus proved a good one and should be 
retained in future seasons. It has 
been further suggested that the re- 
striction making the picture a failure 
if a single sophomore is included in 
it should be modified. It seems from 
evidence gained from this year's con- 
test that it is almost impossible to 
take the sophomores wholly by sur- 
prise within such a small zone ; con- 
sequently it is hard to prevent them 
from mixing in at once with the fresh- 
men, thus spoiling all chances of a 
successful picture. 

May there not be drawu up, after 
due consideration of conditions this 
year and suggestions arising there- 
from, a Bet of rules for next year 
which will provide a more evenly 
matched and interesting contest ? 



Another unsuccessful freshmun- 
picture sea sou has passed ; another 
Index will display a blank page, 
where under different conditions the 
picture of the entering class might 
appear. This year the policy of 
watchful waiting pursued so faith- 
fully for the last two seasons by the 
present seniors and juniors, each in 
their turn, was again rigidly adhered 
to by the class of nineteen -eighteen. 
with the usual disastrous results to 
the plans of the freshmen. 

The usual aftermath followed, ex- 
planations and alibis innumerable, 
and many suggestions, Borne wise, 
others unreasonable. One thing at 
least seems apparent, with opposition 
from the sophomore classes of the 
future as consistent and as insistent 
as it has been in the last three years, 
there can be little hope of any fresh- 
man class obtaining a successful pict- 
ure if the required percentage of at- 
tendance when the picture is taken 



INFIRMARY NOW READY 

Well Constructed Hospital Building; 

Fills Long-felt Need 

The Infirmary has been recently 
completed at a cost of nearly twelve 
thousand dollars. The hospital group 
consists of two buildings, standing 
about forty feet apart, in the shelter 
of the woods just north of the plant 
house. The larger building is tbe 
infirmary proper, and the other will 
be used as a contagious ward in case 
of an epidemic. Built of hollow tile 
with stucco facing, the infirmary is 
of substantial construction and is 
well Jnished throughout. The in- 
terior wood work ts of flue birch and 
maple, and the sanitary equipment 
is complete. In addition to tbe two 
sick-rooms, which accommodate three 
beds each, there is a nurse's room, a 
dining-room, a kitchen with modem 
cabinets and a gas range, a butler's 
pantry and a well-furnished living 
room The contagious ward is built 
on much the same plan, with some- 
what smaller accommodations. Both 
buildings are connected with the 
Heat and Light plant by under- 
ground mains which were laid last 
spring. Workmen are now engaged 
in grading the front slope, and the 
lawn and shrubbery will be put in 
next spring. Miss Florence N. 
Levensaler, of the Boston City Hos- 
pital, is In charge of the two wards. 



WHICH WILL YOU BUY 



A "cream thief" or 
a "savings bank" 
Cream Separator ? 

A CKEAM SEPARATOR IS 
used twice a day, 730 times a 
year, and if it wastes a little 
cream every time you use it it's 
a "cream thief", and an expen- 
sive machine even if you got it 
as a gift. 

BUT IF IT SKIMS CLEAN TO 
the one or two hundredths of 
one per cent, as thousands and 
thousands of tests with a Bab- 
cock Tester show the De Laval 
does, then it's a cream saver, 
and the most profitable machine 
or implement on the farm — a 
real "savings bank" for its 
fortunate owner. 

THE MOST PROFITABLE 
machine on the farm is a De 
Laval Cream Separator. 

THE DE IMl SEPARATOR CO. 

16; Broadway 
NBW YORK 



2' 1 E. Madison St. 
CHICAGO 



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HANUrAOTDRINU JKWKI.KH 

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SUITS MADE TO OKDER 

Suit* Cleaned, Pressed and Dyed. All kinds of 

Repairing for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly done. 

HtKh-arade work by first-class tailor. Work 

called for and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing, 

4 suits rm f i.$o 

GEORGE KOTOWITl, Prop. 

Main Street, Amherst. Mass. Nash Block 

On your way to the Post Office. Tel, 43*- w 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KMimi: aitNDAT SEKV1CK AT 7 P ■• 



♦ They're not short-lived 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 eJsMeen Jersey 
cows were oTficially tested 
which averaged 12 Mars 
and 7 months ol age. Their 
average milk production 
was 8617 pounds. Average 
butter (at, 387 pounds. One 
of these cows was over 18 
years old. 
Longevity, Constitution and Economic 
Production are Jersey characteristics. 

TBE AMERICAN JERSEY CATTLE ClUB 
324 W. 23d St. New York City 





FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in t!i< 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOF.MAM 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin ad Guitar String' 

AMHERST, MABB. 
Next to Post Office. 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, - 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 

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48c per doz. 

- 30c per doz 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 



R.T. FmosT.Agent; D. Shesinyah, A»tt. Ag»r< 
Try (mt ticket system — — 

Pat full name and address on laiindn 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN A DYER* Props. 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
-Pensv— 

S. S.HYDE 

JEWELER * OPTICIAN 

Now it 13 Pleasant Si, 
Oculists' Prescription Filled. Broken Lenses 
Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and Skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



FLOWERS AND PUNTS 

drown by the Floricultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rat< 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations 
violets, chrysanthemums and iweel 
peas in season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone SO* 



WEBSTER'S STUDI'I 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 

Oood work speaks for Itself 

Nash Block, Amherst, Ma I. 



OCKBRIDGE CLUB 

BARBECUE SATURDAY 

I rogram includes Faculty Ball Game 

and Greased Pig Race. 

As announced in many places bv 

utllng and clever posters, the first 

iinual barbecue of the Stockbridge 

>tib is to be held this Saturday Oct. 

■/. at tbe old fort near the drill hall. 

i be fun is sceduled to start at 3 p.m. 

*hen a program of varied amuse- 
ient8 will be indulged in. Chief of 
lie attractions is the faculty base- 
all game, in which for four or five 

Minings the "profs" of the east 

rumpus will contest for honors 
gainst those of the west side. Much 

promising material is already signed 

up for this game including Professor 

I I Hid and Professor Hart, who is out 
for shortstop. 

For those who do not go with the 
teato to Harvard another more elusive 
pigskin will be provided in the shape 
of a genuine razorback hog thor- 
oughly greased. If the sprinters 
around college get into training soon 
■ ii< mgh some records may be broken 
hi this race. Besides these two main 
rveuts, other numbers for the pro- 
gram are being arranged to give 
everyone plenty of surprises. 

Promptly at 4-30 the steer will be 
pulled out of the fire and the grand 
feast of feasts will begin. The 
menu, as planned for, will include 
I'ubccued beef, sweet corn, rolls, 
apples, cider and icecream ; in fact 
everything a hungry man could wish 
for. The Stockbridge club extends 

• •filial invitation to tbe whole stu- 
i< tit body to enjoy its hospitality to 
tin- fullest extent on this occasion. 
Room 12 South College is advertised 
as the place to procure tickets for the 
barbecue at the rate of 25 cents each. 



NO FRESHMAN PICTURE 
New Roles Fail to Add Any Excite- 
ment to Uninteresting Contest 

Notwithstanding the new Senate 
ruling in regard to the annual Sopho- 
i • >re- Freshman picture rash, the 
f- 'finer easily prevented nineteen nine- 
it from making a successful at- 
I - k. For the third successive year 
then will be no freshman class 
picture in the Index. Under the re* 
d rales the season began at noon 
v nirday and continued for twenty- 
I ir hours. Tbe zone in which the 
I dire could be snapped, provided 
U audacious sophs so condescended, 
1 i tided practically tbe whole 
• npus— to be exact the territory 
nded by the roads running from 
tl mathematics building to physics 
1 to the east experiment station to 
>' th college to tbe drill hall to the 
'hematics building. To be suc- 
ci sful the picture should contain 7.0 
I cent of tbe class and no soph* 
o ore. 

Nineteen nineteen started the sea- 

off with a rash. Jost as the 

' k struck twelve about IA0 fresb- 

'> i, who had collected back of Mt. 



Pleasant, rushed down by the math 
building. Due to an efficient scout- 
ing system, however, the sophs wore 
ready for them. A sharp scrap en- 
sued, the scene of action being the 
squash patch north of the "ent" 
building. Several cameras were 
broken and a few black eyes ob- 
tained before the "frosh" finally 
dispersed. This proved to be the 
last action for some time. The 
sophs camped out about the campus 
all the afternoon aud night without 
hearing another bugle call to 
arms. About 6.80 Sunday morning, 
the freshmen made another 
rush, this time coming down from 
North Amherst by trollev. Some 
unsuspecting freshman had unwit- 
tingly confided the plau to a wary 
sophomore, however, so the scheme 
went for nought. No blood was 
shed. Nineteen nineteen seemed to 
lose interest by this failure and no 
other attempts -for a picture were 
made. 




THE IOI7 INDEX 

New Book, Bigger and Better than 

ever Coming in December. 

Now is tbe time to think about 
buying an Index, a review of Aggie 
life. Kach year the Junior class 
gets out a creditable volume and 
each year the book is better. This 
year will be no exception. Hound 
in suede leather and full of unique 
features never before seen in an 
Aggie publication the 11*1 7 Judex 
promises to be a record-breaker in 
more ways than one. 

Fur the Seniors it will be their last 
chance to see their names in print 
and their classic features perpetuated 
in beautiful half tone pictures of the 
various college organizations. The 
Juniors owe it to their class to buy a 
book. If they do not they will have 
to pay for it anyway so why not 
loosen up and get one for tbe girl 
back home. Sophomores realize 
that this is the last book before their 
tarn comes; if they want to get 
some timely suggestions for a neat 
volume here's their chance. The 
Freshmen, last bat not least, will find 
in the Index a ready reference guide 
to the men they ought to know ; a 
book to keep while college days are 
still a live proposition to them. Buy 
an Iwex and show the folks that 
Aggie is still on the map. 



AT OTHER COLLEGES 

The Boston Alumni associa- 
tion of Norwich University has 
presented to their Alva Mater a 
handsome §200 trophy to be pat into 
perpetual competition for marksman- 
ship between the four companies of 
the university. Tbe piece chosen for 
the trophy is Madrnssi's *« Defense 
of His Country." The donators 
chose this subject because they be- 
lieved that it typified in a way one of 
the principles of their college, to 
equip Its men for fullest duties of 
either peace or war. 



You'll have to hand it to us 

On Our Hew made to measure suits 

From S20 to 830 

Made at 112 Fifth Ave., N. Y. 

On Out New Beady 10 Wear Clothes 

KIN KM IN THE WORLD 

Blue Flannel rorfoik and wniie Tiousrrs 

At 814.50 

Tryoiion Knit Koiioik and Flannel Trcusers 

At 8I6.50 

On the fact that we have the experts in our own tailor shop to make any changes 

you may want. 

On the HAND TAILORED SUITS, made in oar own shop, 

front $32 to $45 



Spring Line of Aquaseutums Just Received 

CAMPION COLLEGE OUTFITTER 

Fine Tailoring Hen's Furnishings 

Alterbury System Clothes ol Fifth Avenue. 



F. A SHERARD 

ME N'S STO RE 

Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Dtensils 

Always glad to see yon. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



rris a 

ALWAYS 



In Good Form" 

to answer all formal or informal communications upon 

Symphony Lawn Writing Paper 

Yob should choose this " Paper Beautiful " for all 
writing purposes because It gives to the user that tone 
of style ana quiet refinement which nowadays la so 
necessary. Symphony Lawn writing paper come* in 
all styles and sues: Boa papers, "at home" cards, 
desk pads, and pound papers, with envelopes to match 
— ta white and modish ttwts. 

40c and upwards 

Henry Adams & Go. 

Sold only at The RexaM 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 2$, 1915. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 28, 191 5. 



11 1-2 Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

75c Special Half Sole, Rubber 75c 

WISPAIRINO 

Black. Tan, White Work Guaranteed. 

1 *wn 1 ■:.-» 

Rubber Soles »■ "> 

Kubber Soles, with I let Is 91.75 

Soles Sewed, '■'<> 

88 Shines fur SJl.OO 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours : o to i* a. m ., 1-30 to 5 p. m . 



-MAM KITTING. Telephone 59— K 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 
Windows, Lead Lights, &c. 

f Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS. 



N OTIC E ! 

It is with great pleasure that we announce the attival of our new styles in 

Woolens and Fashions for Spring and Summer 

Included in our selection is a large assortment of 

Imported and Domestic Woolens and Gents' Furnishings 

Guaranteed Fabrics— — 

These cloths are made only for Merchant Tailors, and are well known for 

their individuality and exclusiveness of colorings and designs. 

Their quality is assured you by the trade-mark stamped 

on the goods. I can fill your orders now on 

the latest goods and styles, and 

you can save a 

Discount of 20% on Every Dollar 

WHY NOT BUY NOW? 

Also the Finest Full Dress Suits.and Caps and Go/vns for Sale or Rent 

Suits for ladies and men remodeled, repaired, dyed, cleaned and pressed. 
We respectfully solicit your early inspection. 



Telephone J02-W LADIxOV I I| /L I I Amity Street 
Fine Tailoring and Qents' Furnishings. 



We have m> arra 



i(t « I i- Iritftrtd up-to thf-n irmte. 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 

the most economical you can u»e. 

BetteR crops 



o oN tr * 

DAsLVrt 



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are the inevitable result. 



ROGERS * HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

OiHw ami Works, Portland, Conn. 




Huntington Ave., Exeter and Btagden Sts., Boston, Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

AMOS M. WHIPPLE, prop 



(arpfrvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS. 



No i, Cook PI**, 



Amherst, Mas*. 



NON-ATHLETIC PRESIDENT 

Assistant Prof. H. E. Robbins of 
the Physics Department has been 
elected president of the Non-Athletic 
organization for the coming year. 

The two dollars and a half tax col- 
lected by the treasurer at the time of 
registration, from each student, under 
the heading of Collegian, is to be 
apportioned by the non-athletic 
organization among the various 
separate clubs in the organization, 
according to the necessary expenses 
of each. 



FRATERNITY NOTES 

The Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity 
announces the initiation of Theodore 
H. Reuraann '18 of New Bedford on 
Monday, Sept. 20. 

Charles Allen Eraser '18 of Ply- 
mouth has pledged Kappa Sigma. 



the stock will be so complete as o 
call for no costly additions, and w I q 
everything will have been paid f< , 
Then Washington students will j t 
absolutely everything at cost. Th e 
are now no profits in the ordiua y 
sense, all that is made being turn I 
back into the store for improve men ,. 



Now is the Ume to be planning for 

Fraternity Groups 

Have them taken at 

MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 

44 State Street, • Northampton, Mass. 



COOPERATIVE STORE 

University of Washington Runs Suc- 
cessful Venture 
University of Washington, Sept. 
28. No co-operative store on any 
campus in the country is doing more 
for its student owners than that at the 
University of Washington, according 
to Percy Dearie, manager of the cam- 
pus establishment. Mr. Dearie has 
just returned from a coast-to-coast 
tour of universities, and has exam- 
ined closely into the workings of 
"co-op" stores at most of the leading 
institutions. 

"One thing is certain," he said, on 
his return. "Wherever there are no 
co-operative stores the students are 
paying enormous prices for their sup- 
plies. The tendency of the *co-op' 
store, even when it has no monopoly 
on the book and stationery business, 
ia to hold down the prices charged in 
private establishments." 

Fifteen or sixteen thousand dollars 
is saved annually to students at the 
state university through their store, 
which does a $60,000 business. They 
get new textbooks at 10 to 15 per 
cent nnder customary prices ; they 
save 25 to 30 per cent on all station- 
ery ; and an average of 25 per cent, 
on sundries, including athletic goods, 
gymnasium suits, raincoats, etc All 
texts are sold at coat, but a small 
profit is taken on other goods to meet 
the demand for increased stock. 
The business is growing from $8,000 
to $10,000 yearly, and calls for con- 
siderable additions. 

From three to twenty students are 
constantly laboring in the book store, 
the number varying at different hours 
of the day . They receive from 25 to 85 
cents an hour for their work. Last 
(year students earned $1,500 in the 
store — a great help to those who are 
self-supporting. 

Mr. Dearie found only one store in 
the country operating at as low a cost 
ss that at Washington. Most suffer 
from too great overhead cost, he said, 
many employing far more clerks than 
are necessary. 

He looks forward to the day when 



ALUMNI NOTES 
'94. — Ralph E. Smith, profess >i 
of phytopathology in the College of 
Agriculture at the University of Cal- 
ifornia, is now in the eastern part uf 
the United States studying sugar- 
beet diseases. He was a recent visi- 
tor at this college. 

'02.— Prof. Claude I. Lewis of the 
Oregon Agricultural college spoke at 
the annual meeting of the American 
Genetic association, urging the gem- 
tist to give attention to the produc- 
tion of more good varieties of fruits. 

*04.— Dr. A. W. Gilbert spoke on 
"Color and Inheritance" in Phlox 
drnmmondi at the same meeting of 
the American Genetic association 

'10. — William E. Leonard, who is 
at present employed as a sugar chem- 
ist in Soledad, Cuba, recently visited 
the ci d lege, accompanied by his wilt . 

'10. — Sumner C. Brooks has been 
awarded the Austin Fellowship in 
botany at Harvard. 

'10. — Announcements have been 
received of the marriage of Henry T. 
Coles and Miss Emma Jones' at 
Odessa, Mo., on July 16. They art 
making their home in Humaeuo, 
Porto Rico. 

'12. — H. A. Noyea recently de- 
scribed "A Soil Sampler for Soil 
Bacteriologists" before the American 
Society of Bacteriologists. 

'14.— Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hall 
announce the marriage of then 
daughter Mae Helen to Mr. John 6. 
Wing on Sept. 18, at Pike, N. H. 

'14. — Hoyt D, Lucas is employed 
as chemist with Fisk Rubber Com- 
pany in their Chicopee Falls lab- 
oratory. 

II. — D. A. Coleman is one of the 
authors of a description of the "New 
Methods in Soil Proto- zoology, ap- 
pearing recently in Science. Mr. 
Coleman was in Amherst a short 
time ago. 

NINETKBN-KIFTEBJJ. 

Several of our number have g»ne 
into teaching, Essex County Agricul- 
tural school is so fortunate as to have 
three of oar number in its faculty in- 
cluding "Dene" Allen, "Glad" ( to 
and Ashley Le Due. "Archie ■ 
principal of a high school. "Dolly" 
It teaching mathematics and cl hi- 
istry, in Montpelier, Vt. '*!» «n" 
Lewig is teaching in New Sa iffl 
Academy and Spicer in Bristol County 
Agricultural school. "Cap" > '»- 
ford has taken a position fa a col* ge 
in the South, and Ralph Towi r ii 
teaching in a high school in Lie >d, 
V. H. "Harry" White was to ii« 
been teaching in Van, Armenia, iud 



gt rted in August. A recent news- 
It per report is that be went as far as 
T dis, met a party of refugees from 
V n and because conditions are so 
bad there, is now on his way home. 

15. — The engagement of Harold 
.\ Rogers and Miss Caroline E. 
N dde of Kensington, Conn., has 
In en announced. 

'15. Lester Tarr is at the Dela- 
ware Experiment Station. Address, 
Newark, Dela. 

15. — Vincent S am belli has entered 
M. I. T. and studied mathematics 



during the summer session. He 
spent the remainder of the summer 
on the Maine coast. Address, 7 
Follen St., Boston. 

Ex-' 17. — Hayden H. Smith now 
of the United States Naval academy 
at Annapolis, paid a visit to his 
friends about college last Tuesday. 
Mr. Smith is enjoying his first vaca- 
tion since leaving M. A. C. in the 
spring of 1914. 

Ex-*18.— Robert P. Irvine of Wil- 
mette, III., has transferred to the 
University of Illinois. His address 
is Kappa Sigma House, Urbana, III. 



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GREETINGS ! 



Let us help you to start right— You will find our store full of the 

best there is to be- hail in 

READY CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 

of all kinds, and the 

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Not the ordinary college town prices. We have a reputation of 
thirty years of value giving — Come in anil get acquainted. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



A 



E L Frank Coe Fertilizer s 

1857 mnrn^mK^wm 191s 



Your Opportunity 

The editor of one of our leading agricul- 
tural papers writes i» under date of January 
12th. 1915. asfollows:- 

"1 am doing all I can to induce farmers to 
plant grain crops this year. _ 

"Grain is very high and it ia going higher. 
Wheat U going to $2 .00 per bushel and other 
grams will share in the advance. Wheatcosts 
$2.50 per 100 pounds now, and pound for 
pound oats cost as much. 

"It teems to me that. the eastern farmer's 
salvation is to buy plant toed and grow 
CORN, WHEAT, BARLEY, 
OATS AND BUCKWHEAT 

"Last fall I doubled my acreage of winter 
wheat and this spring I shall triple the acreage 
of oats. 1 managed to produce 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre, and sold the straw at 
$1 7.00 per ton in the ban." 

THE OPPORTUNITY 19 YOURS! 
B« »ure that you buy 

E Frank Coe Fertilizers 



They are available plant foods that more than meet the most 
exacting requirements, giving plump, sound, full heads of gram and vigor- 
ous, healthy straw. 

Eastern users of E. Frank Coe Fertilizers are raising 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre, The avenge for Ae United States for three yean 
is 1 4 t'n bushels to the acre. 

raEWRWrUNTTYISYOUWI WILL YOU MAKE THE MOST ©F IT r 



V 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, 51 Chambers St., N, Y. 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 28, 1915. 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located over post office. Up one Higlit 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System Tel. 36-M 

T. MIEXTKA. 

5H0E STOKE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday from 7.1a, On your way to F. O. 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is a modern hos- 
telry run on the European Flan. It is just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Us rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices SI and up; rooms 
with bath (single) Si.fio and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meat a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan s 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select froi 1, 

OUR RULE 



Highland Hotel. 



>l>! innti. I.I. MUI. 




RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AMD 

CARPET ROOMS 

E. D. MARSH ESTATE 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, PRESIDENT 

AMHERST. MASS. 



'Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded.*' 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 




COX SONS 



— AMD — 



VINING 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C Athletic Fie'.d Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



w I M KIM BOOK AORNTS. 
Both sexes, for best seller published. Particular 

and outfit free, 
OKO. W. SOMKKH. 1-S, St. A.iku.iIii. Hh. 



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CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

»7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mats, 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

CUsmt mh from t A. M to 4 A M 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 

(J. H. Chapman, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

S. W. Hall, President 

C. W. Moses, Manager 

A. W. Spaulding, Mauager 

I). A. Ricker, Manager 

C. A. Huntington, Jr., Manager 

H. W. Bishop, Manager 

President 

J. T. Nicholson, Manager 

F. A. Anderson, Mauager 

L. E. Fielding, Manager 

F. W. Mayo, Manager 

A. J. Hicks, President 

J. E. Harper, President 

C. H. Gould, President 

R. F. Taber, President 




Cbc Pheasant 

HmttS St., Bmbcrst 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for 

Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients. 



CARS 

Leave AQOIE COLLEGE for MOL- 
YOKE at IS min. past the hour. 



Thenars 3#wn Good K«*»ons why youshould 
i>u\ your 



COAL 



or 



C. R, ELDER 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton. Massachusetts 
TWO H LOCKS FROM THE DEfOT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with 

out extravagance.) More popular 

than ever. 

Special I. uric he.. 11 I 2 J P. M. 

PRIVATE DININC ROOMS 
A la Carte Service 
6-jo toll P. M. 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields. past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Ml, alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

SO Miles of Trackage node rn 
Lquipment - Train Dispatch- 
ing System— Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line . 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. past the hour'. 



AIHERSI « SUNDERLAND SI. BY. CO 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 
14*4-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Pa. 



1 111: ikki-hy pa»L<)H 

CIsMalilg rr.»«lii B Repairing 
Unlckeat (Mtrvtoe, t*«»t Work, Loweat fttm 

All woik carefully done. Work called fo' .md 
delivered. Gents* overcoat I, suits, tunt itid 
coats. Ladies' Km linen suite a special! * 
Teams will call every day at U. A. C 

W«. FRANKLIN, fr<l- 
Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. T«l. No <" 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Co, 

616 Chestnut It., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
.....Diamond Merchants ... 

Philadelphia's Official Fntirnlti Je* 

SPECIALISTS IH 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, No-. HI 

Rings, Charms ...... Prises, Tro; N 

Medal* College Pins, Pees, 1 * 

Rings, Charms .•. .'. 






WUl u 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 5, 1915. 



No. 3 



NEW AUDITORIUM OPENED 
TO STUDENTS SATURDAY 

Dedication Program Carried Out by 
Large Gathering. Addresses by 
. Butterf ield and Prof. Poord. 



Aggie's new and beautiful audi- 
torium in Stockbridge Hall was in- 
formally opened to the students and 
faculty with appropriate exercises held 
there Saturday evening in connection 
with the celebration of Founders' 
Day. It was originally planned to 
open the entire agricultural building 
for inspection at this time, but un- 
avoidable delays in the completion 
of construction made this impossible. 
The first feature on the program was 
Mendelssohn's War March from 
Athalia, rendered in especially com- 
mendable manner by the orchestra 
with organ accompaniment by James 
T. Nicholson '16. 

Professor Foord, head of the ag- 
riculture department, then spoke ap- 
propriately concerning the signifi- 
cance of the possession of such a 
splendid building. In closing he an- 
nounced that on Oct. 29, the entire 
hull would be formally dedicated and 
opened to the public. President 
Butterfleld then made a brief speech, 
in which he told of the work of Dr. 
Stockbridge, former president of M. 
A. C, the man in whose boner the 
building is named. The general 
trend of his remarks was as follows : 

•This buildiug symbolizes a won- 
derful advance at old Aggie. With 
its wonderful room and equipment 
it must inevitably lead to a richer, 
deeper, more inspiring life, as well 
afl to contribute to the intellectual 
life of the institution. 

"On the afternoon and evening of 
the twenty-ninth will come the pub- 
lic exercises with addresses of note. 
Tonight we are gathered as a family 
to enter our new home, which will do 
much to further the spirit of friend- 



AGGIE OUTPLAYS HARVARD ON SLIPPERY 
HELD BUT LOSES GAME BY 7-0 SCORE 



LUCK THE BIG FACTOR IN HARVARD'S VICTORY 



Heavy Crimson Eleven Held Scoreless Until Last Two Minutes 

of Play, when Harte Makes Touchdown on 

Intercepted Forward Pass. 



[< niitliiiK'il on ixMte2i 



CORRECTION 

Through an oversight, the article 
1 1 tout the Harvard game in last week's 
< ■ 1 1 > < . i \ s listed that this year was 
the first time in the history of the col- 
lege that an Aggie team has lined up 
against the Crimson. In justice to 
the alumni who were in college In 1906 

nd to correct this wrong impression, 
'he Collegian notes that M. A. C. 

layed Harvard October, 190fi, the 
iutter winning 21-0. 



Perfect football under the worst pos- 
sible conditions, a scoreless game to 
the last twn minutes.. f play, and then 
a game lost ou a fluke tells the story 
of Aggie's defeat by Harvard with a 
score of 7 to 0. Out rushed on line 
plunge* and played to S standstill at 
every point by the Maroon team, 
Harvard wonon a break of luck when 
an attempted forward pass by Palmer 
shaped into Il:ii tc's hands for the 
touchdown. 

Heavy rain for twelve boars before 
the game made the .Stadium Held a 
morass, and only a good mrf made 
any playing possible. The most re- 
markable feature of the game perhaps 
was its perfection under such adverse 
conditions, for not a fumble was re- 
corded and even the handling and 
kicking of the heavy slippery ball was 
faultless. 

That the Aggie team was an even 
match for the Crimson eleven is 
shown by the fact that they gained 
106 yards through the line to Har- 
vard's :><>. This is offset by the fact 
Harvard made five first downs to! foi 
M. A. C. Coach Haugbton sent in 
five men to leinforce his team and 
all were first string men. Captain 
Mahan was not allowed to play for 
fear of injuring his leg on the treach- 
erous field. On the other hand t lit- 
Aggie team played the game intact 
without a sign of wcakeuiug to tin- 
very end. It is notable Unit the 
total penalties amounted to only 4"» 
yards, two-thirds of which were on 
Harvard. 

The game was a hot, hard fight 
from start to finish. For three 
periods the battle went up and down 
the field, without appreciable result. 
Brilliant plunges through the line, 
notably one by Weeks for a gain of 
nearly twenty-live yards enlivened 
the game and repaid the two thousand 
watchers for their temerity in braving 
the rain and wind. Mi night football 
was the schedule on both sides, the 
field being too slippery for end runs. 
Four forward passes were attempted 
two by each side, and one on each 



side being intercepted. The fifth 
try at passing was fatal to M. A. 
C M for it was in attempting to gain 
by this means that Palmer lost the 
ball to Harvard's speedy right end 
It all occurred on Aggie's 30 yard 
line. Palmer signaled for a forward 
pass, and on receiving the ball ran 
back several yards to find some one 
to throw to. The line did not seem 
to hold for in a twinkling he was 
rushed by several Crimson players. 
Palmer's throw slipped and Dick 
Harte was Jobnny-on-the spot, gath- 
ering it into his arms and running un- 
molested to the goal. He was aided 



< untlnuril i'«i luitfi 4 i] 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

HOLDS BARBECUE 

Old Time Sporte and Big Supper are 
Features. 

Founders' Dav, as celebrated Hat- 

if ¥ 

unlay afternoon and evening, will go 
down in history as the most success- 
ful ever held at Aggie in every re- 
spect. The afternoon was devoted 
to the Stockbridge Club's barbecue, 
and directly after supper came the 
informal dedication of the newest 
and biggest buildiug on the campus, 
Stockbridge Hall. 

Owing to the unfavorable weather 
for out-door amusements several of 
the advertised features of the 
barbecue were given up. The only 
outside attraction was the greased 
pig race which began about A-'Mi 
and was the cause of much excite- 
ment After a long run, starting 
from the noith side of the drill hall, 
out under the board track and back 
again onto the old athletic grounds, 
the slippery beast was captured by 
H. T. Whitney 'If.. The gathering 
then went inside the drill hall, where 
a program of stunts was given. In 
the first event, a potato race, T. 
Palmer Wilcox '17, showing excep- 
tional skill with his spoon, was the 
first to move ail his spuds. A three- 
legged race followed in which nearly 

|Ci»lililliir,l tin fittirf* ^*J 



PRESIDENT BUTTERFIELD 
DECIDES TO STAY AT M. A. C. 

Turns Down Tempting Offer from 
Michigan College to Help 
"Boost Old Aggie". 

President Kuiiyou L Butterfield 
states that he Iihh never been ofi'ered 
the presidency of the Michigan Agri- 
cultural college, though he was asked 
to consider the matter. He has 
decided however to remain in Am- 
herst. At dupe] Friday morning he 
Maid : 

•'Last winter there were newspaper 
statements to the effect that my 
name was being considered in con- 
nection with the presidency of the 
Michigan Agricultural college. It 
is true that in the spring I was asked 
if I would consider the jiositiou, and 
I replied in the alMrniative. I went 
to Michigan after our own commence- 
ment last . I unc and looked over the 

field. 

■•"I he opportunity mere, in many 

ways, is most attractive. The college 
will soon have WW students. Its 
income from the state has recently 
been doubled, and is on a mill-tax 
basis, so that the president does not 
have to go to tile legislature cvei \ 
veai for appropriations. Michigan 
is an important agricultural stale, 
and I believe is ripe for thorough 
going rural organization, which is 
one of my main interests, Withiu a 
few years the college will have ibovi 
a quarter of a million of dollars a 
year for extension service atom , 
another of my chief concerns, and 
n. :nl v a million dollars a year all 
told. Moreover, Michigan is n.\ 
native state, and the college i* m\ 
Alma Muter. In addition there 
are many personal ties. So alto- 
gether the pull was a strong oue. 

"The hoard of Management of 
tin- eollege have never extended a 
definite ofter ,hut they were very eouit- 
eous ami frank in discussing the sit- 
uation at Lansing, and my possible 
connection with it. After a long 
deliberation I have finally decided 
to stay heie and help "BoOftOkl 
Aggi 

ELECTIONS 

Assistant Managers for Baseball are 

Elected. 

Robert D. Hawlty of Springfield 
and Oliver (J, Pratt of Salem were 
chosen assistant managers of base- 
ball this week. 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 191 5. 



AUDITORIUM DEDICATED 

I < nut inuril from p.iuc I] 



linens. We have a right to congratu- 
late ourselves when we realize that 
tliis new opportunity and splendid 
equipment lias now actually come to 
fruition. When we contrast the fa- 
cilities ten years ago with present 
ones, the change seems almost re- 
volutionary. The results are better 
opportunities, greater facilities all 
around, a marked increase in num- 



" Loyal Sons of Old Massachu- 
setts'* was the final number on the 
piogram, and it was sung with even 
more spirit than usual. 

THE HARVARD GAME 

(.Continued from iwite 1] 

by several teammates who also broke 
through and interfered for him. 
Robinson, a substitute fullback kicked 
the goal. 

No man on the Aggie team should 
go without credit for his part in the 



King was then used for four consecu- 
tive plays, being held twice but event- 
ually making another first down. 
Rollins tried a fake punt but an Aggie 
man broke through and caught him 
for a loss, Watson tried a forward 
pass which fell into Aggie's hauds. 
Aggie then took the ball but before 
play started the eight minute quarter 
ended. 

SECOND QUARTER. 

Weeks started things by two rushes 




hers, and every year a richer inheri- 
tance and larger responsibilities. In 
cmi v one of (he forty-four years in 
which this institution has graduated 
classes it has sent oat great men. | 
Now we ran send out even befit) 9 
men. We are all under strict obli- 
gations to meet the incnasing re- 
sponsibilities. We are particularly 
glad to celebrate in took ft splendid 
way the opening, in a family manner. 
of the college's greatest building. 
Stockbridge Hall." 

Tin- rest of the program was fur- 
nished bv the musical and dramatics \ 
clubs. The glee dub, as yet only 
partially organized, rendered Bul- 
la's "Swords out for Charlie" and 
"Fight on to Victory" in a very rredi. 
table Banner* The quartet sang 
"In Pieardie," and the orchestra 
gave an excellent selection. 

.Tames T. Nirholsou and Francis 
M. Andrews 'It! of the Roister Dois- 
t.is presented a short but very in- 
teresting sketch, entitled "Hilly's 
Blunder." Both showed their custo- 
mary skill along dramatic lines. An- 
drews in particular, in his impersona- 
tion of the heroine. 

The moat pleating musical number 
was the solo work of Harlan N. 
Worthley '1*, who was at his belt. 
His singing of Boulieur's "8tar of the 
Detert" wm exceptionally well exe- 
cuted, but Worthier** encore, "The 
Perfect Day," wm even better, and 
was highly appreciated. 



SiiKKUKiiMiE Hall. 

game. Weeks' plunges through Har- 
vard's line were the longest made. 
Darling too carried the ball for long 
gains. Captain Oman was in every 
nlav. Dav was on his toes everv 
minute, and (irayson blocked one of 
Harvard's forward passes almost be- 
fore it left Watson's hands. Perry 
played a wonderful game at center, 
and with Dunn and Jordan on either 
side, opined up great holes in the 
Harvard line. Da n forth and Plaisted, 
tackles, played a hard game and sev- 
eral times broke through to nail some 
Harvard man for a loss. Palmei'* 
work as quarterback was heady and 
his kicking was superb, equalling any 
done by Robinson, Whitney, Kn- 
w right or Rollins. 

i ikst QCJJOBft. 
Knwright kicked off to Palmer who 
brought it to the ;'•.") yard line. Pal- 
mer made a beautiful punt to Har- 
vard's IS yard line which was carried 
hy King only .'» yards. King tried to 
break through the line but Rollins 
was asked to kick. Aggie took the 
ball on the to yard line. M. A. C 
made only a slight gain so Palmer 
punted, the bat! going over the Har- 
vard goal line for a touch back. 
Rollins carried the ball to the 80 yard 
line and advanced it 10 more. Rol- 
lins made it first down and later 
brought it to the center of the field. 
A penalty for offside against M. A. 
C gave Harvard another first down. 



netting 10 yards. The next play 
failed and Palmer's kick wm blocked 
but the ball waa captured off aide by 
Grayaon. It waa Aggie's ball on 
the 40 yard line and fust down. 
Harvard was penali/.ed for starting 
ahead of the ball. Palmer tried an 
end run but was stopped after a two 
yard gain, Weeki made a gain of 
eight yards. Palmer kicked to Har- 
vard's l.'i yard Hoe. Rollins and 
King each carried it six yards and 
then King took it to the 30 yard line 

for first down. The next two plays 
failed and then Rollins waa caught 

way back by .Ionian. Grayson stal- 
led an attempt at forward paaa. 

.Massachusetts took the ball. 
Weeks carried it to the ?>'l yard line 
and then to the ;'•'> yard line. First 
down was made iu the next play 
which gained 6 yards. Aggie was 
penali/.ed five yards for offside and 
then the half was over 

SECOND HAM-'. 

Palmer kicked off, Rollins advanc- 
ing it to the 88 yard line Rollins 
went through for a long gain and on 
the second play he was at the center 
ef the field. Hatvard was then pen- 
alised 10 yards for interfering with 
secondary defense. Rollins kicked 
and uV ball waa AggieVon the 6 yard 
line, ft itiul of punting out Palmer 
sent Weeia through for 10 yards. 
Harte was inj ired in thli play but did 
not go out. 'mi an gained 10 more 



for first down. Harvard waB penal- 
ized 10 yards for offside and it was 
Aggies' ball on the 22 yard line at I 
first down. Darling made 5 yards in 
two plunges and then Palmer tried i 
forward which failed. Then Palmer 
kicked to Rollins who was stopped on 
the 37 yard line. Rollins made only 
two yards in a line plunge and then 
he punted, Darling capturing the ball 
on the 18 yard line. Weeks then 
made a spectacular gain of 18 yards. 
Another gain by Weeks made it first 
down. Curran then hit the Crimson 
line for twelve yards in two plunges 
but the third attempt only netted one 
yard and Palmer punted, Watsou 
making a fair catch as the period 
ended. 

KOItTII oi'AKTKK. 

Harvard made but a slight gain on 
the first attempt and then King made 
H yards, Knwright added three. 
Perry was dazed by a knock iu this 
scrimmage but soon steadied. 
Whitney then came in to relieve Rol- 
lins, and Wilcox replaced Enwrigh. 
Harvard punted and Darling made a 
fair catch. Harvard was penalized 
16 yards for interfering with him but 
the interference was probably due to 
the slippery field rather than hy in- 
tention. Aggie made slight gains tin- 
next two plays and in the third Palmer 
was caught for a loss. 

Robiuson replaced Whitney, who 
srained his leg on the previous punt. 
Palmer punted to Robinson who took 
it to the 3.'» yard line. WUcox gained 
a foot or so on a line plunge and then 
made 2 yards on an end run. His 
third attempt wm a failure for he was 
caught for an eight yard loss. He 
pnnted, Palmer roping the pigskin on 
the 40 yard mark. The next two 
plays only netted M. A. C. about 3 
yards and then Palmer tried the fatal 
pass which Harte captured for a 30 
yard run to the goal posts. Robinson 
kicked the goal . R. C. Curtis then 
replaced Parsons. 

Robinson kicked off to Danforth, 
who carried it forward to the Mjard 
line. Weeks then made a great 
plunge to Harvsrd's 4J» yard line, giv- 
ing Massachusetts her last first down. 

The next play netted I yard*. 
Coolidge relieved Harte. Ttartl 
Palmei kicked, the ball going to Um 
goal post. Here the memorable 
game ended. Harvard the lockl 
winner. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 1915. 



The summary : 




II \IIV Mill. 


M A. < 


Noiicy. le 


re. 1.1 ' 1 


Parsoa ,< ' urti», it 


rt, Ha"' 


Duncan. ly 


rji. '••' 


Wimri". «■ 


e. 1 


Dadiniiii. Ig 


llT, !»lt.<n 


Bijfelnw, rt 


it. riaN-«! 


Harte, OooHdga, re 


le. I'i> 


Walsufi. i|l* 


ljb, fan r 


Kullins. Wileox. Mil* 


rhb, Oar R 


King, rhlt 


Ihb. 1 n 



Knwright, i 
Whitney, [ fb 
Robinson 1 



ft., vv. 



Swire— Harvard T, M, A. ('. »- T* 
down— Harte. Hoal from touebdo* 
|{ul.itiK«.n, I'enaJUea- Harvard 86 
M \ « 1 1 yards. Yards made b> ' r 



1 iid pass - Harvard and M. A. I", failed 
, eomplele. |{e!eree-\V. \| . Uollen- 
ick, l*. P. rinpire — K. W. Murphy, 

l.ruwn. Kit? Id judge — W, 8. f'aiiiiell. 

lulls. Linesman — VV. 11. iitirke. W . I'. 

I, Time — M-minute periods. 

FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT 

Athletic Field to be Dedicated by 

Colby Game. 

Alumni Field the new home of M. 
A. C. athletics will be dedicated 
with the first home football game of 
the season against Colby Saturday. 
Fresh from the laurels of holding 
Harvard to a 7-0 and Dartmouth to 
a 13-0 score the home team is confi- 
dent that the Colby team will prove 
Hither easy. Colby has played two 
games this year, defeating New 
Hampshire State 18-0 Saturday and 
losing to Harvard 89-G the week 
before. The Colby line failed to 
shine against Harvard and the heavy 
Crimson backs ripped it up in a man- 
that augers well for Weeks and Cur- 
ran, while Malum rounded the Colby 
sods for long gains, just as Darling 
should do. According to the Harv- 
ard team the Colby team was very 
crude at the time of the first game 
hut it is expected that they will have 
improved to such an extent that a 
close contest will be in order. 

The Massachusetts team showed 
the result of the week's work by the 
tremendous improvement that was 
noticed in the team work of the men 
One of the moat gratifying features 
of the Harvard game was the work 
of the back field on the offence. The 
defence of the Aggie teams of recent 
Mars has been of the best but the 
offence haa been weak and this year 
it seems aa if the two were to be 
1 uuibined into a well balanced eleven. 
The work of the ends at Harvard 
was also especially good and after 
die first quarter they ahowed a brand 
of play that spells death to any of 
('••Iby's attempts to gain around the 
wings of the Maroon team 

Coach Brides is working the team 
hard this week with the idea in view 
«f bettering team work ami providing 
more interference for the man with 
the ball. From the showing of the 
It mi in the first two games, the siu- 
<!• at body are convinced that the 
balance of the schedule should show 
Metories for M. A. C, barring aet-i- 
ih-nts. The team has shown the 
ability to line up against big teams 
"I finish the game in good shape, a 
splendid tribute to the training of 
the men, to that tbia latter factor is not 
ts peeled to prove very serious. Mass- 
a< lifisetts will present the same lineup 
that played all through the Harvard 
1 without a substitution and with 
out only once. The Aggie team 
ell fortified with second string 
'iieo but second string backs and 
ends are not as numerous and it is 
pa I of the task of Coach Brides to 
- slop them for the big games that 
*r to follow. The student body has 
|i it faith sn the old Yale player 
*ti i are convinced that if it is posai- 
1 '.rides will do it. Thus fir be 



has developed Curran into a fast,hard 
'speedy back and has unearthed in 
j Weeks a reguhu demon at the line 
plunging game. Palmer is rounding 
into a very heady quarterback and 
the balance of the team appear much 
improved over last year. 



DEBATING TEAM HAS 

BRIGHT PROSPECTS 

Contests Being Arranged with Colby 
and Maine. 

The M. A. C. Public Speaking 
Council is attempting this year to 
arrange a series of debates for the 
college teams thst will surpass any- 
thing that has been accomplished 
heretofore. At the present time a 
triangular debate is pending with 
Colby and the University of Maine 
and the prospects are that these will 
be held. An attempt has been made 
to arrange a dual debate with Clark 
college but this does not appear pos- 
sible. The first debates that will be 
held are the inter-class debates. The 
first of these, the freshmen-sopho- 
more contest will be held on Nov. 10, 
The senior-junior debate will be held 
Nov. 1 7 and to final debate will take 
place Dec. 8. The Council has de- 
cided that men who have been on the 
college teams shall not be eligible 
for these contests but that they shall 
be for the purpose of briigiag out 
new men for the bigger ami more 
important, work that is to follow. 

Try out-, for the class teams » ill 
beheld Oct. 20 as pari of lb* woik 
of the recently organised debating 
club and all men who are to enter 
should see Professor Smith or man 
of the members of the council as 
soon as possible. 

It is hoped that with the incentive 
of a chance to debate against .Maine 
and Colby and with the chance to 
win the cups that will be offered to 
the champion interclass team, there 
will bo a number of men come out for 
the class teams. 

Later in the jeftl there will be held 
the Flint Oratorical conteat, o|nn 
to the entire college and the IturnliMiu 
Declamation contest open to the 
members of the two lower classes. 



Tree Management, Poultry Husban- 
dry. Home F.conoinics and Rural 
Sociology. The registration is re- 
stricted to citizens of Massachusetts 
or persons owning property in this 
State. For details regarding the 
courses interested readers should 
Correspond with Edwin II. Forbush, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
Amherst, Massachusetts. 



ODE YEAR'S SUPPLY I flu 
II L OF MAGAZINES I Ub 

DO YOU KNOW "'■" >"""i"-'i- "i iHihiMiti-r* 

Ihi sample ,.,,,,, ,,| 11,,. (, Magutnc If tht-v . tti l> 
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una M0u reader*. 11 smu will write sum 

full Hililrr** VERY 1.1.1 in um! s.ihI iin ONLY 10 
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ni biindrodi j.»*. novero! hundreds 1 »f I he li-ml 
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iiiusi i.iii'd Magaatiici Bad in fad uImhii all 
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CORRESPONDENCE COURSE 

TO OPEil OCTOBER FIRST 

AntiorjQcement him been reoeiveti 
from the KztcoRion Herrice of Um 

h"."^"* Ab : ' °*r School and College photographers . . . 

Uiat the Corrc8|»oti<lent*f ContSOX in 

Agricalture »od Home Hk-unornitiH (fill 

open on Oct. 1, UM."». The College 

baa rarrit'd 00 Utls "long <liHlRiie«** 

teaching for & number of yearn with 

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for tht widespread and increasing in- and South Hadlcy, Mass. 




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instruction. Courses will In- offered ^^^ ^-— «^ 

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The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 1915- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 1915. 



5 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published i-vi-r.v Tueaday erealHg 
i.v the Students of Hie Maaaachu- 
itetta Aurieiilturul College. 



IKiAltD OV EDITOB8, 



TYI.Ki: 8. ROftBIM 1*. 

Kit IIAliO W, SMITH IT. 
I I; ASK .1. S< TIKI I' KI.K Ti 
THUS. I,. IIAKRiM KS U.. 
AI.KKKH A. liluldSV li.. 
KWIUIIT K I'. MINKS Hi. 



K.ilitoi-itH lilef 

Maaacias Editor 

\**i.«tniit Kilitur 
Athletic Kililor 
AtliW-lii- Editor 

\ 111 III III l.llil.M 



MILVOIU) U. LAW KKM k T7. New* Editor 
KIJ<IOT llKM>Ki;soN 'it, I >t-i«ii t tm-nt Editor 
V\ II. MAM SAVIKI.K, .Hi. '17. CjimpMn Mltor 
HAROLD K. .iosks •I*'. \-.snH,it«- Editor 

MARSHALL O. I.ANl'HEAR 'I*. fcMo'i Kilitur 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

(HAS. A. Ill NTINtiToN. .lit. Hi. 

BusbMH Maiiaifff 
HRRRILL I". H aiiski; 17. 

Assistant Business Maiuucer 
I.KSTKIIK. KIKKIHMi "W, 

\<l v i-rt i.Hliiu- MiiiuiL'fi 
JAMES C. |-ii\VKI.I.Th. i in iilnti.m 



Babacrlptton si.;,o per year. Single 
copies, 6 caste, Make mil ordeis paya- 
ble to Charles \. Hi VTINOTov. .li;. 



Entered as afiMind-i'laHH nmtici iit the Auihenit 

CnHt one*. 



Vol. XXVI. Tuesday, Oct. 5. No. 3 



Piiksioknt Butterfikkd's action In 
declining to consider the presidency 
of the Michigan Agricultural College 
is of utmost importance not only to 
this college but to the Commonwealth 
us well. It was a personal sacrifice for 
the sake of an institution and a state 
that needs him at this time. The 
strong houd of With and an open 
doorway to the goal of his ambitions 
were not enough to turn President 
liutteilieltl from his present duties. 
That others appreciate his unselfish 
action is shown by editorial com- 
ment in the Tremacripi which we 
publish below : 

•'President Kenynii L. Ibittet field's 
decision to remain at the head of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural college, 
despite the large opportunity which 
was opening for him iu Michigan, 
dcHervesourcitizens's gratitude. He 
has withdrawn his name from the list 
of eligible candidates for the presi- 
dency of Michigan State college of 
Agriculture, on which he stood ss the 
man whom the trustees most favored. 
The position offered Mr- Btitterfleld 
fell play for all the executive ability 
and expert knowledge of rural con- 
ditions which bit work in this state 
has clearly shown he possesses. It 
ottered him the management of large 
sums, not only for the development 
of the Western college itself, hut also 
for wide extension work through all 
of Michigan. It ofVeredhim freedom 
from annual begging trips to the 
legislature. Certainly Massachu- 
setts should be prepared to make 
some recognition of President Butter- 
field's loyalty. It has already 
granted to tire Massachusetts Afrl- 
cnltnral college a five years' appro- 
priation for maintenance, and it has 
refused to make a similar grant for 
the buildings and other additions to 
plant whith the college needs. Even 
though it was shown that ao appro- 
priation continuing through live years 



would be a move for economy ami 
elliciency in the management of the 
college, the yearly piecemeal grant 
was all the General Court would con- 
sent to. There are other considera- 
tions than salary which lead an eflic- 
ient executive to remain at his post, 
and these are largely determined by 
the opportunities which his position 
gives him to do an important con- 
structive work. President Butter- 
field has withstood one call to another 
field. Only a liberal policy will keep 
him, or others like him, in theleader- 
ship of the State's agricultural col- 
lege aud of its campaign for wide 
rural progress." 

NEWSPAPER COMMENT 

Harvard is lucky to beat Massa- 
chusetts Aggies. 

It was a battle between two "equal 
and opposite forces," and, aB in all 
contests of that sort, it was a slip 
that counted most. 

Weeks played a good game for his 
team and it was through him that the 
M. A. C. eleven put up such a hard 
fight. 

Palmer, at quarterback, did his 

pait and showed rare judgment in 

his orders. 

— Boaton Sunday Herald. 

It was a clean game throughout. 

Honors were about even in kick- 
ing. If there was a shade for any- 
one it would be for Palmer, who 
played the entire game. 

liOXtoil Si'llil'l'l J'nst 

Weeks, playing as fullback for the 
visitors, was strong. Curran, the 
M. A. C. left halfback, was in every 
play. 

Right up to the last few minutes 
of play it was a battle betweeu the 
opposing lines with neither side 
showing stronger than the other. 

— Button Siinilu'i Globe. 

One got the impression that the 
rangy, heavy team of the invading 
eleven out played Harvard. At all 
events the Aggies showed better 
football, both offensively and defen- 
sively and had the Crimson pretty 
badly worried at times. 

Day, the left end, and the two 
Aggie tackles, Dauforth aud Plaisted, 
played rattling good games on the 
defence. The center, too, of the 
Aggie eleven had Harvard's defence 
worried to death at times. 

To repeat, it looked to the writer 
as though the Aggies outplayed Har- 
vard, showing greater development 
and team work, but they didn't have 
the luck. 

— Jionton 8 a nihil/ American, 

Notes 

Because of the similarity of the 
colors of the jereeyi worn by Har- 
vard and M. A. C. the black jerseys 
of the Harvard second team were 
offered for use by the Aggie team. 
The offer was quickly accepted. 

The M. A. C. men were the guests 
of the Harvard A. A for lunch be- 
fore the game at the Harvard Varsity 
Club. Throughout their slay the 



guests were treated with the greatest 
consideration. In the dressing 
rooms eight or ten candidates for the 
Harvard managership were contin- 
ually working for the welfare of the 
Massachusetts men. 

It is notable that this was our 
second game against Harvard. On 
Oct. 13, 1906, M. A. C. was de- 
feated 21 to in a hard fought and 
wholly honorahle game. Cobb of 
the Aggie team was rated one of the 
best on the forward pass, that being 
the first year of its use. 



01 LAVAL 

SEPARATORS 

are the 

Most Economical 

yOU get by far the greatest 
actual value for your money 
when you buy a De Laval — BE- 
CAUSE a De Laval will give you 
much better and longer SERVICE 
than any other cream separator. 

From the standpoint of its 
greater durability alone the De 
Laval is the most economical 
cream separator to buy, and when 
you also take into consideration 
its cleaner skimming, easier run- 
ning, greater capacity and less 
cost for repairs, the price of the 
"cheapest" machine on the mar- 
ket is most exorbitant compared 
with that of the De Laval. 

THE DE UVAt SEPARATOR CO. 



* They're not thort-liwd 

The Jerseys 

la 1913 d«Me«n Jerjei 
cows were officially tested 
which averaged 12 Tears 
and 7 months oi age. Their 
average milk production 
wa*8617 pounds. Average 
buMer tat 387 pounds. One 
ol these cows was over 18 
years old. 
Longevity, Constitution and Economic 
Production are Jersey characteristics, 

TIE AMEUCAN JESSEY CATTLE CMS 

324 W. 23d St.. New Terfc city 




FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



'. I'.rnailwiO 
\M» VnHH 



B K. Mail tw hi SI. 

inn a no 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOF.MAN 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 
COLLSGS JEWRLKY 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar String* 

\ m ii i I'.sr MASS. 
Next to Post office. 

Amherst 

GO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



KlUIUUID 

Stkimikn Lank FoIiOER 

MANurAtrruRiNO jkwkl.kr 
1W) HKOA DW A V. N KW VOH K 



CLUB AND COLLKUE 
I'l.vs AND B1N«S * 

„„|.|l, *II,V*H AMD MtONSH MHIUI.B 

LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDEK 
suit* Cleaned, I'rewd >nd Dyed All kinds of 
Repairing for Ladtea and Gentlemen neatly done. 
HiKgrale work by SntchHj** 1 *'- Work 
calWTor and dtllTered. Sell tickets for pressing, 

4 SUITS FOR ft.W 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, Pros*. 

Main Street, *"}"*"'« Wjfh T t a fi.uP ck 
On your way to the Post Office, Tel. 43»-W 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 

% l-JC 

2 I-2C 

48c per doz. 
30c per do;. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 

K.T. FaosT.Agent; D. Sherinyan, Asst. Agent 
Trjr ear ticket system 

and address on laundr \ 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

1: n . 1 1 \ 1: SUNOAT BBRYICC AT 7 r. M. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN A DYER, Props. 

Loose- Leaf Note Book* and Fountain 
—Pens— 



S. S. 

JEWELER 



E 

OPTICIAN 



Now at 13 Pleasant St. 
Oculists' Praicripttous Fitted, Broken I .n.se« 
Accurately Replaced. Pine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and skilfully Dnne. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Horicultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
Is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone soo 

WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 
(lood work speaks for Itself. 

Nash Block, Amherst, M^ 



STOCKBRIDCE CLUB BARBECUE 

[< onttmied from page 1] 



all the contestants "spilled" round 
the turn, allowing the "Hardave" 
combination, Worthley and Lipshirea 
' im, to win handily. The sack race 
required two heats, Bruce and New- 
ton '18, being the respective winners. 
Bruce could not manage his pedal 
extremities in the final and Newton 
defatted him easily. Calls for 
faculty and co-ed raceB were smoth- 
ered by the excitement following the 
announcement that the banquet whs 
to begin. 

There followed such entertainment 
as has seldom been offered at Aggie. 
All were given plates of beef sand- 
wiihes, with pickles and steaming 
hot sweet corn, followed by cider, 
apples and fancy crackers. In the 
midst of the excitement came the an- 
nouncement that at the end of the 
first half of the Harvard game 
neither team had scored, and by the 
time the eating was nearly over the 
report of the final score put a fitting 
rlimax to tuch an enjoyable affair. 

VOLUNTARY SUPPORT 

FOR COLLEGE Y. M. C. A. 

Pledges being Solicited from Stu- 
dent Body. Budget Announced. 

In years past the Y. M C, A. has 
relied upon the dollar membership 
fee for money with which to carry 
on its work. The sum has been 
ipiite inadequate, especially during 
the last year or two, consequently 
the association has adopted the 
ncheine being installed by the major- 
ity of college associations, namely, 
that of handing pledge cards to all 
studentB, leaving it with them to 
ilfcide whether or not they shall con- 
tribute to its support. As was stated 
in last week's Collegian, the regu- 
lar membership fee has been done 
away with. The pledging of money 
does not make the individual a meni- 
licr of the association in any way 
whatsoever. 

Cards have already been handed to 
students attending the Seerley lec- 
tures and as a result the association 
has received the pledged sura of 9232. 

Following is the budget for the 
year 1915-lfi as decided upon by the 
Cabinet : 
-' nrley lectures, 8100 



( ampatgn fund, 

Contributions tothe State and In- 


100 


ternational Y.M.C.A. Com., 


26 


stationary, 

The 11 and hook. 


2a 

10 


Telephone, 


25 


< uitingent expenses, 


50 



Total, 186.1 

I'ayments on pledges may be made 

time during the office hours 

posted on the bulletin board in Kast 

1 :i try, North College. Those who 

l not received pledge cards will 

een shortly and it is hoped that 

tt v will feel justified in pledging a 

k llcient amount to make possible 

work of the association for the 

ing year. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

President Butterfield was the 
speaker at the first Sunday chapel in 
the uew auditorium. His theme *ai 
"Self-denial, Self-COntrol and self- 
diieetion." 

"The ideal of a classical educa- 
tion is to make men, helping them to 
be something. The ideal of voca- 
tional teaching is to make ellicient 
workers, helping men to do some- 
thing. Kach lias its limitations ; the 
classical form too often overlooks 
the character-building value of 
worthy work, the vocational may 
place too much ou mental and man- 
ual efficiency, and too little on the 
element of character. 

"Our college stands for vocational 
education. This has its perils. We 
may fail in teaching growth through 
work. We may neglect the develop- 
ment of the will, the cultivation of 
the vastly important qualities of self- 
denial, self-control ami self-direc- 
tion. These three elements in 
education do not appear in our 
laboratory manuals noi in our tech- 
nical lectures, but I believe that 
technical skill means nothing unless 
it is directed by the proper wttl, 

"Self-denial has a harsh sound, 
but it is not a refusal to enjoy, nor 
an evasion of things to be enjoyed. 
Self-denial is not abstention but 
choosing — denying ourselves the in- 
ferior for the sake of the superior, 
the giving up of the mean, small, 
petty things for the things which are 
fine, large, noble, gaaanotll und 
right. • Choose ye this day whom 
ye will serve.' Give up the bad to 
get the good, give up t tie good to 
get the better, the better to get the 
best. This has its significance with 
regard to our daily life, our relation 
to studies, and to campus leadership. 
Self-denial may involve a refusal of 
an unwise prodigality of power, or 
an unwise prodigality of pleasure. 

"Self-control is a cousin to self- 
denial. Impulses Im.dilc from the 
human heart, first iu little streams, 
which presently wear a deep channel. 
We may control these streams, we 
may compel them to be what we 
wish. We have i body which we 
should not ignore, a mind which we 
should cultivate, a moral conscious- 
ness which we should listen to, arid 
not violate. To learn to control 
one's mind is one of the hardest les- 
sons which the college man has to 
learn. Many a promising Freshmuu 
has failed in college because he has 
not learned to control himself. < 1m 
should will to be master of oneself. 

"The third factor is self-direction. 
Sometimes it seems that a man is 
like a fiark afloat — buffeted by the 
winds of chance, carried by the cur- 
rents of social tendency. Many men 
are tempted to drift, to go with the 
crowd, to succumb to the mob spirit. 
Often young men are too afraid of 
the opinions of others. So much as 
a man drifts through life, by that 
extent he misses the opportunities 
for highest development. 8#tf- 




You'll have to hand it to us 

On Our New made 10 measure suits 

From 820 to 830 

Made tl i \z Ftlih Ave , N. S*. 

On Qui New Ready iu Wear doilies 

KINI-ST IN I III' WOULD 

Blue Flannel KorfoiK and Wliite Trousers 

At 814.50 

Tryoiion Knit Koitoik and Flannel Trousers 

At 816. 50 

t )n the fact that we have the experts in out own lailot shop to make any changes 

you may want. 

On the HAND TAILORED SUITS, made in our own shop, 

from $32 to $45 

Spring Line of Aquascutums Just Received 

CAMPION COLLEGE OUTFITTER 

Fine Tailoring Men's Furnishings 

Atterbury Sy.stem (lollies of Fifth Avenue. 

F. A. SHERARD 

ME N'S STO RE 

USE OUR NEW CASH DISCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to sec you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



lc ONE CENT lc 

Pour Hundred different articles to l>< sold at 

ic EACH 

Thursday, Friday and Saturday 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rcxall Store 

lc ONE CENT lo 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 191 5. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 1915. 



J. QINSIUJKG 

11 I-* Amity Stmt 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

75c Special Half Sole, Rubber 75c 

KIOI'AIUIM. 

lil.ick, Tun, White Work Guaranteed. 
■ •WICKS 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

I) KNTAL ROOMS 
Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: qtu 13 A. M„ I .10 to j T. M. 



K'ibl)er Soles ..... 
Kubber Soles, with Heels 
Soles Sewed, ..... 
•4'i Shin. ■ for SO. on 



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Specialty of Repairing 

J 1 ** Church \V i .shows, Memorial 

*'" 7S I Windows, Lead Liohts, &e. 

" « Clifton Ave.. AMHKKST. MASS. 



NOTICE ! 



It is with great pleasure that we announce the anival of Our new styles in 

Woolens and Fashions for Spring and Summer 

Included in our selection is a targe assortment of 

Imported and Domestic Woolens and Gents' Furnishings 

Guaranteed I u ! nc s 

These cloths are made only for Merchant Tailors, and are well known for 

their individuality and i'\c'lusivviics> of coloring!! and designs. 

Their quality is assured you by Ihe tiade-in.uk stamped 

on the goods. I can fit] your order? now on 

the latest goods and styles, and 
you can save a 

Discount of 20% on Every Dollar 

WHY NOT BUY NOW? 

Also The Finest Full Dress Suits.and Caps and Go/vns for Sale or Rent 

Suits for ladies and men remodeled, repaired, dy« 1. 1 leaned and |>reaied. 
We respectfully solicit youi earl) inspection, 



telephone 302- W 



LABROVITZ 



I I Amity Street 



direction is a thoughtful adjustment 
to the winds and currents of life. 
What to do today is a stone in the 
permanent foundation for the future. 
The most precious thing is not doing, 
hut heiug. Do something in order 
that you may become something. 
The cultivation of the will is the 
more important than the acquirement 
of knowledge, the attainment of 
campus leadership, or the making of 
associations. 

"Steer your own craft of life. 
Train the will — and the portals of 
the will are self-denial, self-control 
and self-direction." 



Fine Tailoring and (lints' l-'urnishinns. 

W>< h.lVf - i Iff t i I * • I'll/- I ll|' In tin II II lit.- 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 



OK 
the most ••( iiiiotiiii si y«*u can if-e. 

BetteR crops 




**fm\xz&* 



are 1 1 1 «- inr\ u*h|« result. 



THE ROGERS * HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

OHn-r .»i>a Hinl,.. 1'iiMlaml. ( ■>i,n. 



COPLEY SQUARE HOTEL 

Huntington Ave., Exeter and BJagoen Sts., Boston. Mass. 
Headquarters for College Men when in the city . 

AMOl M. WHIPPLE, PROP. 



£&rptrvter fit Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mas*. 



Now is the time to be planning for 

Fraternity Groups 

Have them iaken at — — 

MISS McCLELLAlTS STUDIO 

44 State Street, Northampton, Mass 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

Tuesday night saw the formal open- 
ing of the Stockliridge club for the 
coming year. President Tabcr '!»> 
outlined the work for the first semes- 
ter, especially urging the members to 
boost the club. This year the organ- 
ization will be divided into three sec- 
tions. Animal Hushandry, Poultry, 
and Pomology officers for these 
grOOpa will be elected at the next 
regular meeting, Tuesday, Oct. 12. 
At the following meeting. Oct. 19, 
OeorgC K. I.add, a prominent grange 
worker, will lecture before the club. 
Thereafter the section will start one 
group meeting each week. There 
will also fie two general meetings. 
On Nov. 2 George Drew, a former 
graduate, will address the club. 
December 7. Herbert (ollingwood. 

editor of the Rural A<" Yorker, will 

speak before the three groups. This 
will constitute the program until the 
second semester. 

The Stockhridge club is » Iron t to 
open its most successful season. 
Never before have the opportunities 
for an agricultural organization been 
ho promising. At these meetings, 
conducted by Aggie men and promi- 
nent agriculturists, excellent chance 
will be given for any active student 
to pick up good infoi mation about his 
major. Sophomores and freshmen 
are also urged to consider the beoefits 
to be derived from the club. Now is 
pint the time to gel in line for that 
major work. Information gained at 
the Stockbridgc meetings may influ- 
ence your whole course. There is 
still another reason, however, why 

eserv one should see Moses '16 im- 
mediately about application for mem- 
bership. The many teams, apple 
packing, stock judging, fruit judging 
etc. will soon be chosen. These 
teams will go on several trips about 
New Kngland, attending many of the 
best fairs. Stock bridge club pays 
the expenses of all men on those teams 
who are members of the organiiation. 
If yon are not a member you pay 
your own fare. The beat course is 
thus obvious. Join the Stockbridgc 
club. Aggies* only agricultural organ- 
isation. 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 

The 1910 football team lost its 
initial game of the season to Con- 
necticut Literary Institution at Suf- 
tield Saturday by the score of six to 
nothing. The winning touchdown 
came as the result of a blocked kick 
at the end of the first quarter. When 
the second quarter opened, C. L. I. 
rushed the ball twenty-five yanls for 
a touchdown. The home tesm was 
composed of veterans while the fresh- 
men had never played together before 
and their showing in the face of 
adverse conditions was especially 
gratifying. The baekfield and ends 
played very strongly on the defence 
but the line was very weak. On the 
offence the work of Poole was of high 
order. 

On Saturday the freshmen will 
tackle the husky Williston team and 
widi a week's practice together ex- 
pect to give the Kastharnpton boys s 
beating. 



The Higma Phi Kpsilon Fraternity 
announces the following pledges ; 
Itoewell Woodward Hennigar "17, 
Williamsporl Pa. ; Paul Bennett 
Wooding 'is, YalesvlUe, Conn. 



EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 

HAS EXHIBIT AT FAIRS 
Shows Work of Different Departments 
of the College. 

The large educational exhibit of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, housed in a 40 x 70-foot tent, 
has appeared at a number of the Ag- 
ricultural fairs of the State during 
the past few weeks and baa yet to 
visit two more fairs. This week on 
Wednesday and Thursday, October 
8 and 7 the exhibit will be seen at 
the Three-County Fair at Northamp- 
ton and on Friday and Saturday, 
October 8 nod 9, at Ware. Among 
the fairs already visited are Barnsta- 
ble, Worcester, Clinton, Williman- 
sett, Cxbridge, Kramingham and last 
week at Creat Barrington. In ad- 
dition to the extensive exhibit, in- 
cluding a large case descriptive of 
the work of each of several depig- 
ments of the college, various types 
of apparatus and equipment for the 
farmer are shown, and good and bio I 
points graphically pointed out. Kadi 
day a aeries of lectures and demon* 
strations is given in one end of tin 
tent. Professor E. D. Waid is in 
charge of the exhibit and Messrs. A 
(,. I. inn i, R. W, Rees and W. II 
Hronson appear on the lecture pro- 
gramme and are present to give per- 
sonal advice and information to the 
hundreds of interested persons who 
visit the exhibit at every fair. 

NINETEEN -THIRTEEN MOTES 

Lawrence Bevan was married Aug 
1 7th and is now living at 229 Main 
street. Concord. "Bcv" is still 
teaching agriculture in the high 
school at Concord. 

"Bruin" Brown is making good ' 
Hood Farm, Lowell. Mass. 

Paul Serex, Jr., is now u 
fledged member of the teaching staff 
in the Department of Chemistry he- 
at college. 

Stuart Moor visited college lai 
week. Stuart start* in at Tale I 



-try this fall after two years of 
'caching in Wisconsin. 

At the June meeting of the Asso- 
iate Alumni Fred Griggs was 

-eted as alumni member to the 
Sou-athletic Board and Kid Gore to 
the Joint Committee on Intercolleg- 
iate Athletics. Remember » 1913," 

Itoast Old Aggie" — the Dramatic 
Clubs, the Musical Clubs and the 
Athletic Teams, _every chance you 
get. If you have any suggestions to 
make, if you can book a date for the 
Musical Comedy in your home town 
or if you have in mind a prospective 
Freshman of M. A. C. calibre, let us 
know. 

George Zahriskie, 2nd, has just 
returned from an extended tour 
through California aud the Canadian 
Northwest and has settled again in 
Chicopee Falls. 

Two more items of interest from 
Chicopee Falls. Haus Koehrs is with 
the WeBtinghouse K. A M. Co. of 
New England, working in the Dry 
Kiln Dept. and getting up at 4 
o'clock every morning in the week. 
And "Joe" Cobb announces his 
engagement to Terza ChuBman of 
Chicopee Falls. "Joe" is now sole 
owner of a big farm at Birchem 
IU«ud." 

Gentlemen of 1913 — stop, look 
and listen — will wonders never cease. 
Reyor Hermann Van Zwalwenhurg 
announces his engagement to Miss 
Mary A. Pattyson of Silver Creek, 
N, Y. " Vive la Zwatsie ! " Reyer 
is still at Mayoquez, Porto Rico. 

Hoy Proutv ex-' 18 is with the 
Portland Street Railway Co.. Port- 
land, Ore. 

Please send in notices of interest 
to '» 1913," concerning yourself and 
the other fellows in the class, to 

Apollo" Serex, Ben Kllis or Kid 
Gore. Address as usual, M. A. C. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

•91.— On Aug. il and 22 Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles K. Brown gave a house 
party to several members of the class 
in their vicinity with their families. 
The following were present with 
their wives and children :T.S. Bacon, 
liiown, Howard, Morse and Smead. 
There were 20 in the party and were 
entertained royally. Brown has 
recently purchased a farm in Kant 
f -ongmeadow which is developing as 
rapidly as circumstances will allow. 
He has modernized the large farm 
liouse and has already planted a large 
number of fruit trees and vines and 
■ lis. He still has an interest in 
tli City Laundry in Springfield, 
Tli« members of the class present at 
tiia home decided that next summer 
*s many of the class as could be 
g ten together with their families 
^i .Id meet somewhere for a field 
<l . 

I —Charles P. Ix>unsbury has 
!'' n awarded the South African 
111 Inl, founded by the British Asso- 
1 on in 1905, for scientific research 
ir > outh Africa. It was awarded tit 



the Pretoria meeting of the South 
African Association for his entomo- 
logical investigations. 

'y/i. — K. A. White, professor of 
floriculture at Cornell University, has 
recently written a book entitled, "The 
Principles of Floriculture." This 
was edited by Dr. L.II. Bailey in his 
Rural Text Book Series, and is pub- 
lished by the MacMillan Co. The 
press reviews of the book are highly 
complimentm s . Professor White 
spends his summers on Mt. Pleasant, 
Amherst, aud is taking work in the 
graduate school at M A. C, 

'04. — M. F. Ahearn, for many 
years now a popular member of the 
horticultural staff at Kansas Agri- 
cultural College, has recently been 
promoted to be professor of land- 
scape gardening. 

'07. — The engagement is an- 
nounced of Miss Edith Stickney of 
Stratham, N. H., to Charles Morton 
Parker of Brookfield. Parker is to 
move to Fiskdale where he has pur- 
chased a large farm. He will retain 
his interest in South Warren for 
the present. 

•08.— H. M. Jennison lias left the 
Montana State college for a year at 
least to take up post graduate work 
at the Missouri Botanical Gardens in 
St. Louis. During the time he will 
hold a position as instructor in the 
Henry Shaw school of Botany at 
Washington University. He may he 
addressed care of the Missouri Botan- 
ical < .aide. is. St. Louis. 

'08. — T. II. Jones Ib the author of 
the I . S. Department of Agricul- 
ture, Bulletin 192, entitled '-Insects 
affecting vegetable crops in Porto 
Rico." 

'12.— Benjamin l'\ Hubert, di- 
rector of agriculture at the South 
Carolina Agricultural College, Or- 
angeburg, S. C, will have charge of 
the Negro Farmers' Day, to be held 
in that town Nov. 12th. 

'14,— T. W.Nicolet.has been elect- 
ted assistant professor of landscape 
gardening of the University of Ne- 
braska, and will take up his duties 
Oct. 16th. He will be given oppor- 
tunity to develop the new department 
of landscape gardening in that insti- 
tution. 

*I4, — Ernest Upton recently left 

the civil engineering deportment of 
the City of Salem to tnke up work 
in the Nanmkeag Mills of that city. 

'13.— E. It. Bartlett left on Wed- 
nesday for Cleveland, Ohio, to enter 
the employ of Louis Brandt. 1910. 
who is a piacticiug landscape archi- 
tect in that city. 

l.V. —M.N.Goodwin, left last week 
for North Carolina, where he will take 
charge of the landscape department 
of a large nur 



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8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 1915. 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



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Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletic*, 

M. A. C. Athletk Pfe'.d Association. 

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Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Assot iul.on, 

Teunis Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association. 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

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Fraternity Conference. 

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C. A. Peters, Secretary 

G. 11. Chapman, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

S. NV. Hall, Piesideut 

( . \V. Moses, Manager 

A. W. Spnulding, Mauager 

1>. A. Kicker, Mauager 

A. Huntington, Jr., Mauager 

II. VV. Bishop, Mauager 

President 

J. T. Nicholson, Mauager 

F. A. Anderson, Manager 

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loiiltvirami 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 12. 1915. 



No. 4 



FIRST COLLEGE DANCE IS HOLY CROSS EXPECTED TO 

MOST SUCCESSFUL AFFAIR PROVE STRONG OPPONENT 



Aggie Meets Purple Team at Wor- 
cester Saturday. Hard Practice 
the Rule All This Week, 

Saturday the Maroon and White 



Large Attendance at Informal Follow- 
ing Oolby Game. Celebration of 
Victory Adda to Gaiety. 

Aided by a wonderful football vic- 
tory, perfect weather, a good floor, football teu:n will face a hard game 
and fine music, the informal season with one of the strong eleven* of 
watt ushered in with a rush when the 
fust dance was held in the Drill Hall 
on Saturday. About seventy-five 
couples attended and helped to make 
it the success that it was. Owing 
to the football game the dance 
did not begin until nearly an hour 
late but this was more than made up 
hy the enthusiasm which went to 
make this one of the best informala 
that Aggie ever bad. The work of 
1 lie committee is to be especially 
commended as the whole program 
went off without the slightest bitch. 
Tbe hall waa tastefully decorated as 
usual with maroon streamers, flags 
and banners, the orchestra being in 
the c— ta r of tha floor surrounded by 
palms, and the cbaperones at the 
-on them end under the balcony. 
During the second balf, a huge boo. 
fire waa lighted in the old fort and 
cheers for Smith, Mt. Holyoke, tbe 



[Continued on 1 '•>«•• Hi 

CROSS COUNTRY RACE 

WITH M I. T. SATURDAY 

Visitors Have Strong Team But Aggie 
Expects To Do Well 
Tbe first scheduled varsity race 
'-oraes here Saturday, with tbe strong 
M.I.T. team as opponents. Tbe 
1 ace will start from Alumni Field at 
'-» 4. r > and is expected to finish be- 
tween the halves of the freshman 
football game with Chicopee. M.I.T. 
finished before Aggie Is the Inler- 
collegUtes last season, sad can be 
upended upon to provide a stiff 
match. Owing to the ineligibility of 
»ll freshmen during the first semes- 
ter, Carpenter, the winner of Satur- 
day's rsce, will not be allowed to 
•in. He was last season's inter- 
hulas tic champion, and his services 
•ill lie of great value in the fu- 
ire. Tbe course for the Tech race 
ill probably be about 4. A miles long. 
Manager Rleker announces the np- 
■>•>••■ l schedule : 

M. I. T. at Amherst, Oct. 16. 
W. P. I. at Worcester, Oct. 23. 
Springfield Y. M. C. A. College at 
ptingfleld, Nor. 6. 
lnterooilegiates, Nov. 13. 



the east, Holy Cross, at Worcester. 
The Worcester boys in their first 
contest held West Point to a 14- 
14 tie and it was only by waging 
a furious assault that the Spriug- 
field Y. M. C. A. college was able to 
carry home a 7 to ft victory. The 
Purple and White are a fighting team, 
game to the last minute, and never 
known to give in. A'thougL **" 
Aggie team won the last game 
by a 14 to ft score from Holy Cross, 
it was only after the whistle had 
blown that the Maroon and While 
knew that the day had been won. 
Holy Cross has a strong defense and 
a wonderful offense, which is always 
a source of danger and worn to the 
opposing team. Devlin, Daley, Don- 
nellan and Hurley make a hackueld 
combination bard to beat, and with 
MeCarty at end, the opponents 
offense *ib complete. Devlin, the Pur- 
ple quarterback, plays a great game 
on the offense, his forward passes to 
McCarty frequently resulting in large 
gains and spectacular plays. Cap- 
tain Hi aw lev. at center, is the main- 
stay on the defense. Although he 
waa hurt in last Saturday's contest, he 
will probably lie back in form for the 
Aggie game. 

One of the big factors in Aggie's 
favor is that every player is in per- 
fect physical condition. Not a sin- 
gle man waa seriously hart in the 
three big games played this season, 
and the strongest possible line-up 
will be put in against the Purple 
team. Last week's game showed 
what the team's offense is cap- 
able of doing. Weeks is hitting 
the line like a venerable Drickley, 
while Darling's spectacular end runs 
need no comment. Captain Curran 
at halfback has already proven the 
sagacity of Coach Brides* choice by 
seldom falling to go the required 
distance in a pinch. Palmer, at 
quarterback, waa never in better 
form. His punts are seldom out dis- 
tanced, his lightning forward passes 
are nearly perfect, while hia choice of 
plays has been the subject of much 



FOURTH CONSECUTIVE WIN 

FOR NINETEEN-SIXTEEN 

Senior Cross Country Team Again 

Takes Victory, but Firat Place 

Goes to Carpenter '19. 

For the fourth consecutive time 
the class of 1916 won the annual 
interclass cross-country race when 
they gained first place by a margin 
of ten points over their nearest com- 
petitors, the freshmen. Saturday 
morning. The point scores were : 
seniors 31, freshmen II, sophomores 
4.">. and juniors no score, because the 
required five men did not finish. 
Carpenter 'IU, was the first one to 
cross the fiuish line, coining in ahead 
of all the varsity men, and covering 
the I.I ,.::le course in 23 minutes, 
IK 8-6 seconds, Aiken and Hichards 
'16, finished second and third, and 
the other ruuners finished in the fol- 
lowing order : Lyons MM, Bell, '17, 
Glover '16. Chapin '19, Russell '16, 
Mitchell '18, Hathaway '19, Schwartz 
'IH. Uiclumlsou '17, Gordon *1M, |n- 
galls'lh, Harding *i9, Patc.i Irt, Mc- 
Donald '19. Hamilton '19, Haskell 
*16. 

The officials were s Starter, C. S. 
Hicks; referee, Palmer; judges. 
Perry, Warren and Cariey ; timer, 
Warren ; scorer, Bicker. 

COLLhGUN COMPETITION 

Two More Places on Editorial Board 
Open to Sophomores. 

Two vacancies on the editorial 
hoard besides the two regularly open, 
to sophomores, have been occaaioned 
by the resignation of former mem- 
bers. It is an unusual oppoi tunity 
to win a position on the board, and 
candidates are called out at once. 
Tbe present (ward reserves the right 
to refuse election to any or all candi- 
dates if their work is not uptostand- 
ard The rules published in the first 
issue of the Collegia* hold for the 
extra jiosltions from the sophomore 
class. 



[i Olltlllllfll I'll |I»K< 



METTAWAMPE CLUB 

ELECTS OFFICERS 

The Mettawainpe Club has re-elec- 
ted officers for the year as follows ; 
President, Prof. F. A. Waugh ; Sec- 
retary Prof. J. C Graham ; Trek 
Masters, Mr. F. C. Kenney, Prof. A. 
K. Harrison. Profesaor Bobbins, and 
E. H. Forbush. A program of treks, 
feats, and stunts of various sorts 
has been arranged for certain Satur- 
day afternoons in the year. 



AGGIE WINS FROM 
COLBY BY 26-0 SCORE 

Large Crowd of Alumni and Inform- 
al Guests See New Alumni Field 
Dedicated with Victory. 

VISITORS ARE OUTPLAYED 

Aggie Makes 22 First Downs to 
Colby's Six. 

Smashing the Colby line ami rac- 
ing around the Colby ends, the 
Massachusetts Aggies sent the 
Maine team down to defeat on the 
new athletic field Saturday by 
the score of 26-0. It was a proper 
dedication for a finely equipped field 
as the home team outclassed the vis- 
itors in every department of the 
game. Although outweighed, the 
line pushed the bOavy Colby line 
around as if thev weri* puppets and 
Darling, Curran, Weeks and Palmei 
Inrs ihroiifh for long gains 'before a 
balf a dozen of the secondary defence 
could bring them to earth. Palmer 
outpunted his Colby rival at every 
stage of the game. Colby vainly 
tried to work the open game but the 
alertness and speed of the Aggie 
backs and the agility of the line in 
breaking through and hurrying the 
pass caused most of them to go 
astray while the Ajgie attempts at 
the open game resulted in several 
long gains. The physical condition 
of the home team was far superior to 
that of Colby and the latter had to 
have time out on nearly every scrim- 
mage. If there were any stars in 
tbe Aggie team the honors must go 
to Darling and Curran, the former 
for his long, dodging, twisting end 
runs and the latter for the terrific 
manner in which he slid off the Colby 
tackles. Tbe rest of the team were 
not far behind and the substitutes 
who were sent in a body in the last 
quarter proved that if any of the 
regulars are injured, Aggie has some- 
thing to fall back on. 

Aggie, kicked off to Colby on the 
ten yard line and the ball was 
brought back to the twenty yard 
line. After failing to gain in two 
trys the visitors punted to Darling iu 
the middle of the field and he ran it 
back five yards. Weeks reeled oil 
fifteen vards and on the next plnv 
Palmer gave the ball to Darling, 
who sidtd by good interference ami 





i 

i 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 12, 1915. 



mi uncanny ability to dodge and 
twist away from would be ladders 
raced thirty -live yards for tbe lirst 
score of the game and the lirst touch- 
down on the new lield. Palmer 
punted out to Darling and later 
kicked the goal 

Colby rallied at this point and 
threatened Aggie's goal for the only 
time in the game. They rushed the 
ball down to the tweutv yard line 
where Darling spoiled a forward pass 
and the ball went to Aggie on the 
twenty yard line. Curran made 
lirst down and the quarter ended with 
the ball in Aggie's possession on the 
forty yard line. 

M. A. C. drove through the line 
for long gains and both of the Colby 
ends were laid out. When play was 
resumed Curran went over for a 
touchdown and Palmer missed the 
goal. Colby kicked off to Curran 
and he ran the ball back twenty 
yards before being downed. Palmer 
theu kicked for forty-five yards and 
Plaisted. coming down like a race 
horse recovered the Colby fumble, 
before the back could drop on the 
ball. Palmer made a short forward 
to Weeks and the period ended with 
the ball in Aggie's hands on the 
eight yard line. 

Colby kicked off to Darling to 
open the third period and the red 
haired Aggie back raced jfrentj 
yards before he was &ftt)j spilled. 
Curran bowle-.' ()V er the line for one 
first dow.vand added another on the 
neji play. Palmer tossed a beau- 
tiful forward pass to Orsjaoasad 
the hea\e netted twenty yards. 
Aggie was penalised live yards for 
Offside pb'Vi but Curran made 
another first down and then Darling 
squirmed the entire Colby teum for 
sixteen yards and a touchdown. 
Palmer's kick missed the goal by 
inches. M. A. C. kicked off to Colby 
and the latter failing to gain, punted. 
Several short gains and I couple of 
offside penalties brought the ball 
down to Colby's thirty yard line from 
which Darling again dodged through 
the Colby team for the last touch- 
down of the game. Palmer kicked 
the goal bringing the score up to 
twenty-six point- Coach Brides 

then sent in a Mock of substitutes and 



PRESIDENT SPEAKS AT 

WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 
Suggests Problems To Be Worked Out 
At M. A. C. 
Assembly was held for the flrst 
time in the auditorium of the new 
agricultural building on Wednesday. 
President Huttei fiekl was the speak- 
er, and gave his reasons for remain- 
ing at the head of M.A.C. rather than 
changing to a western college as it 
was rumored a short time ago. His 
remarks were, in brief, as follows : 

'*! stayed because I believe there 
are big things to do on this campus, 
not from the standpoint of size and 
measurement. I do not mean to say 
that we are not going to do big things 
in that sense, but 1 do not think that 
we shall ever have the attendance of 
the great agricultural colleges of the 
Middle West. It is quite probable 
that with all the liberality that may 
be expected, we shall not have as 
much money as is going to those in- 
stitutions in the West. I believe 
there is a chauce here for some big 
things, things big in their significance. 
We have a host of problems showing 
themselves here in Massachusetts, 
and they are going to test us. 

"There are a number of ideas in nn 
mind as to what ought to be dew** 
here. Sti.'.l; .ViiKiers as the quality of 
uiBtruetion, such matters as the course 
of study, arise. We have got on our 
feet as a graduate college. There is 
a big chance there. We shall have to 
face the problem of the women, too. 
We have an experiment station, but 
we feel that we are ouly scratching 
the surface, as it were, in that way. 
We are coming to a period where the 
German idea of elliciency is going to 
have its way with us, an idea of thor- 
ough-going education in agriculture, 
the same as in business. 

♦•I want to see this college from the 
ground up, ami in every sense, an 
agricultural college. I want it so 
definitely an agricultural college that 
nobody will think it is anything else. 
In the second place, right alongside 
of this idea, I waut to be sure 
that everybody connected with, or 
interested in, the college shall have a 
broad conception of what agriculture 
is. In the third place, I want to see 
1 grade of scholarship here that is 



INFORMAL 

[i.'oattnoed from paire ll 

girls, and the team helped to hven 
up the occasion. The chaperons 
were: From M. A. C. Mrs. Britter- 
field and Mrs. Fleet; from Smith, 
Mrs. Billings, and Mrs. Kmbree ; 
from Ml. Holyoke, Mrs. Schaefer. 
The following attended : 

1916 — Russell, (iaventa, Barnes, 
Sander, Clark, Strauss, King, Fer- 
nald, Sherinyan, Darling, Selkregg, 
Hathaway, Moses, Palmer, Hall, 
Goodwin, Nicholson. 

1917— -Williams, R. Smith, Hallett, 
Sims, Saville, Gurshin, S. Chamber- 



lain, E. Kelsey, Bonn, Ligh 
Stearns, Rutter, Wilber, Ross, Boa 
Henderson, Buttrick, Hill. 

1018— W. Sawyer, Clapp, Jacl 
son, Farrar, Buchanan, vanAlstyn. 
Phipps, Dillon, 8 Smith, W. I 
Sawyer, Baker. 

1919— Field, Wiswell, Seheuke 
berger, Parkhurst, (iurshin, Carle 
Beadle, Campbell, Howland, Dum 
Montgomery, Anderson. 

Otheis — Johnson, Morse Mi 
Hutchinson '14, Brown '14, Port. 
*14, Perry '15, Pellett '14, Buell M 
Draper Mo, Terrill ex-'17. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct, 12, 1915. 



Why Not Board at the 
College Commons ? 



Run at Cost for the Benefit cS ihe 

Students 



Good Food Furnished 
at $4.20 a Week 



""*A 



in twee or four plays the game was 8et . nd to none, and by that I menu 

real, hard, solid achievement. There 
is no reason on earth why we should 
not have it. A fourth thing is this : 
1 want to sec I larger interest in wlml 
may be called. f->r want of a better 
same, the culture side of life. I 
want to see a larger thoughtfulness 
on the pari of our student body in 
the things that constitute, after all, 
the real issues of life. And lastly, I 
should like to think that this college 
is going to have leadership among 
the colleges of the state and of New 
England, at least in what might be 
called campus life." 



ovei . 
Summary 1 

m \ 1 < 'in m 

Orayaun, Banter, le rt, C'arj . Perrj 

PialHtad, 8| Ming, ii rt, Heats 

Jordan, Edwards, le rg, Joyce 

P»l 1 v . Utlrk. i' i\ M;ili\\i»iil 

Oumi, Htittru-k. rf Iff, !.<•«« m, KnttMMh 
Danforth. Ed Wards, n It, Sttu&on 

l»;i\. Mi Kit-, rv !••. .lime*. Lemur 

I'.iIuht. >lni|.li.\ . i|l. i|li, Kr.iM-r.n llrien 
( iirnni. Weeks, Ibb rhb, M,«html*r 

Darling. IJi. lie*, rlili Hi'*, Cfiwley 

Weeks. I'almer, fl» 

fh, Itenilri. U. I. ill. fniwunaii 
v,.,,re-M, A. ( . 26, O.Iby <> Tom tf 
tlown*— Darling I, Curran. <«>stls from 
tiHichiliiwn*— Palmer a, Refer** — Mc- 
Orolh, iii».!..n < ullek'e. riu|iire — Iluh- 
)i:nil, Smlierat, Head linesman — Mail- 
.Ir» .11 Siniimih-lil linn— 10 minute 
ijiiarler*. 



Lunch Room With a la Carte Service 

in Connection 



'0.1.—" Buck" Chafery is located 
at Maxwell, N. M., on "bug work" 
fin the Bureau of Entomology, 



More Feed Per Acre 

The cost of producing neat or milk would be much 
lets if it required fcts acres to produce the feed. 

Both the quantity and quality of ihe feed improve 
when tbe right plant foods are wed to supplement the 
manure and clover. They improve enough to yield a 
handsome prpfit on the expenditure. 

The right plant food includes enough + 

POTASH 

In available form. Supplement the manure and phosphate 
with 50 to loo pounds of Muriate of Polish, or £Oo to 400 
pounds «»f Kainit, prr acre, and you will raise big corn and 
fine clover afn-r the grain and at the sane time improve 
the fertility of the soil. 

Try Potash salts alone on the swamp land pasture and note the 
clover and good grasses crowd out the wild hay. Write us far 
prices of Potash, one bag up. 

GEBMAN KALI WORKS, lac, 42 Broadway, N»w York 

■tMentiet ■»•»» , C»lr«p, 111 lw| « Tftut Blit , »«T»hU«h a*. 

WllttwF D.atriU lot BT*i , P*» Or1»inn, L* 
tapir. Bid* . AtUat*. o». is c.llforal. St , tai rrkeeiw 



C. 



1ST OF SUNDAY CHAPEL 

SPEAKERS ANNOUNCED 

The public is invited to attend 
In- Sunday morning Chapel exer- 
ises nnd the Wednesday Assemblies 
1 the Massachusetts Agricultural 

* ollege. The new auditorium in 
Mockbridge Hall will be used for 

liese general gatherings and ample 
rediiimodutions foi seating the pub- 
ic will be found in the balcony. The 
•Minday services are held at !• a. u. 
1 ml the Wednesday Assemblies at 

I 1*. M. 

The following is the list of Sun- 
lav Chapel speakers for the year; 
ilso a list of the Assembly speakers 
!m the fall months: — 

Sunday Chapel speakers — Nov. 7. 
1'rof. William H. Taft, Kent profes- 
sor of Law, New Haven, Ct. J 14. 
Dr. Samuel A. Eliot, president of 
the American I nitarian Association; 

I. Kev. Albert P. Fitch, president 
Andover Thelogical Seminary ; Dec. 
... Kev. .1. Stanley Durkee, pastor 
South Congregational church, Cam- 
pello ; \i. Prof. Walter Bauschen- 
luiflch, professor of Church History, 
Theological Seminary, Rochester, N. 
V. ; Jan. 9. Dr. Hubert C. Herring, 
"v -cretary National Council of Con- 
gregational churches, Uoston ; l<>. 
Lev. Rockwell H. Potter, pastor 
I irst Church of ( hrist. Ilsirlford. 
ft. j T.\. Rev. Roger S. KmbeN, 

I niturian) chureh. Durehehler ; 80. 
IN-v. Cornelius H. Patlon, secretary 
the American Board; Feb. |8. 
Uev. K. A. K. Palm.piist, pastor 
North Avenue Rapist church, Cam- 
hrMfti -"■ ,{ *' v - ,s - "' Bradley, 
tor Piedmont Congregational 
. Itiireh, Worcester ; 27. Prof, Ben- 

.min T, Marshall, professor of Bibli- 

il History and Literature, Dart- 

.mli college; March ."». Rev. K. 

I Sandemon of Brooklyn, K. \.; 

]'2. Rev. .1. Herman Randall, pas- 

i Mount Blorrin Baptist church. 

New York city ; April «J. Dr. Chris- 

in F. Reisner, pastor OfSCt Metho- 

• ••list Episcopal church. New York 



courses to be given in Boston and 
vicinity. R. D. Waid, J. B. Foord, 
f. C. Sears, R. W, Rees, S. Ii. Has- j 
kell and L. B. Hayes had a confer- 
ence about the matter and decided 
that there would pro.iably be three 
courses of eight lectures each. The 
courses will begin the lust of October 
and last until Christmas, The sub- 
jects will be poultry, farm manage- 
ment and either fruit or vegetable 
growing. These courses will be given 
by co-operation between the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural college, the 
Chamber of Commerce at Boston 
and the School Committee of Boston. 
Last yea i nine courses of five lect- 
ures each were given with an average 
registration of 200 people. 



Prof. R. H. Ferguson, S. K. Parker, 
of Ilardwiek, Howard F. Lcgg, of 
Wilbraham. 



COUNTRY LIFE CLUB 

Winter Program Includes Many Live 
Speakers and Practical Work 

A program of the work of the coun- 
try life club for the following winter 
has been formulated by the active 
members. It was thought best to 
divide the program into two parts; 
that coming before the holidays to 
comprise a statement of the rural pro- 
blem, the program following the 
holidays to take up actual achieve- 
ment* in the rural field.*. In using 

M. A. C. men who sn teaching rsr- 

ioii* pha.HCK of agriculture it i* with 
the hope that they shall state in dean 
cut term* the problems within MsSSS* 
COQSSttS, which lie* before them an 
their particular field Therp in Rodcsirv 
for them to net forth facts cmm-ci mriu' 
their depaitment but merely tti speak 
of it an a Mlale wide or community 
wide problem 

It seemed lughlv advisable to work 
out some means by which the mem- 
bers of the club could participate. 
This might !»c in the form of a nludv 
COSrSfl or by reporting on various 
topics which may have been assigned, 
such as: *Tlow a town handle* the 
llh of July celebration.'* "A Christ* 
mas Festival," or other public occa- 
sion 

The following ptfSOM hsst l***en 



nMC YEAR'S SUPPLY ifl n 
UHl OF MAGAZINES lUb 

Rfl Yflll KNflW " , -" iniii.tii.i~ i>r ihiI)IIhIii>i« 

UU IUU M1UTT wouW |„. u , Ul ,i tnsi'ii.l \..ii i 
in-. s.iii.i>U' . n|i> ..1 llirir M;iitii/ini. if llipy only 
kn«v >..in .i.iiln-H-..' Il is oar builnett to i»i 

iiimIi i >k I ■ 1 1- 1 1. - i - .inly With I he n. iMir-.nl Inl.'lll 
Kent iiiiiy:t/mi' rtaden. If roil will write jNrtll 
rul I inlilri-ss VEBY i.hiln iinil Mad us ONLY 10 
cetil.i in (liver i>r money ..nler we will nend 
y.iui iiiiiui- tnseienil Imnillfil jiulillnhert witlilli 
ii year, who will send y.»u FREE AHinnln i-ojiIpd 
< if liuinlieiiH lyeH, several hunrireilin ( ,f rlie leml- 
lllli H««m1.ii.l MiiifU/mes. lann l':ii>er«. I'.niltry 

Juurnals. Story Mauu/inen. Mevlews and W eckl] 
I'apeis. Mail Order anil Trade I'ul.h. ,.i h.n- 
l|.iii«ekee|iinu Mintar.ineii, KasliLm .Iniiruals. 
iihiiitniteil Mau'a/ini-Ji ami In la. I hIhuii alt 
kliiils of higli-unrde inteiestiiia awgwd aw • ■••»■ 
Iriit ti> yuu In imxit eyerv umll fur mer .1 year. 
and all r..i ONLY 10 eenm <la illvtr>. 



WE-DO-AS-WE-SAY 

•11 >eint ,. -il.. 'i < 1 1 111.' at once anil youi name 
nill mo "ii "in next iiifinlir* . -ireulntlnit ll*t an.l 
> till will he gTOtt tly Btirp rllVd lit tin- nMUlMi a» 
ui-,i«.inr you tlmt yini will la- mure than wall 

alcaied ajth ttie .m.ili Iiumi 111. And you 

WILL NEVES r««re« it. \ .1.1 1 mi 1 he Maintxlnc 

I il. nlatlmt Co.. li'.x .*>24ll, IkMtoti, I', K A, lit 
eulaiiiiit |ie|.t IM». DON'T tall n. write YOUR 
mil a.lilresi. EXTSA nlain, We tune *"inethlnu 
III ■tore fur y. m— as a real mi put -if >.>u will 
|ilea»e let \f kimw in what |m|wr y.m «* thin 
a<l\ ertl"eiii»iii . 



An Hapecially Uaod Commtoslon I'topiisitniii 

Cash for test otdi-^- Article Wi.Iely AilVettiMd 
Cilt>. down i Mens.- in powtl 1 l.ints— Ailtiiess 
BtiniMBBRING si eel y Co., (1]8 N nth MieH, 

PhlUd*lphtm, Pa, 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Inbbersof Wrought Iron and Urns* Pip#, Valves 
ind Kitting* for Staaln, Watei and Ga%, Asbestos 
*nd Magnesia Holler and Tip.- ioveiings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supnliei. Knglneurs and 
('. .nt 1. 11 tors for Steam an.l Hot Wfttel Hfnttng, 
Automatic Kpriafcici Sy»tem», RoIWi and hiiRtre 
Connections. Holyoke, Maaa. 



i««»«i« l >t*-v»«»et ft>f 



BECKMAN 



•* II«»«ai|t *• 

'*BIDE-A-WEE M 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Otti S pacta hy -Ami othct Reed tininr- (■ 

MRS. L. M. STEBBIN5, 

Midtlle Street, llailley. Mass. 

lei. 411; \V 



DR. R. C. BANCS 

Dentist 

NASH s BLOCK 
Kvennigs by ApiMHntsnent. 

hotel ttlarrcn 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T. J. AHCRN, MANACCN 



itv: 16. I>r. J. ltoss Sti'vensoo, 

1 Seminary, 1 8U «« e,led to " ,,|>eur h ° f ° ,e iUe 



n"4ident Theologioa 
l*rio«lon, N. J. ; 23. K. B. .Stni'.h, 
i»f New York dty; 30. Iter. A. I*. 
Ilec^ffd of .Springfield. 

Wedneaday Aaaeinblies. — Oct. SO. 

umcig B. Sayre of WilliamitowB. 
AsiUtant to the President of Wil- 
li mi* college ; tl. Chancellor I >avitl 
Marr Jordan of Miami Stanford 

uiversity; Nor. 3. George A. Drew 

M. A. C , IW7) manager of Con- 



holiilays 

Oct. IS. -Wliat \h the Hurnl Pro- 
blem," President Kenyon I.. Better* 

field. 

Oct. 27. "What are tlio PvoUssst 
the Extension Service i* eodssVWfSjf 
to solre." William I). Ilnrd 

Nov. 10. "Wlint ih thl Pmlilein 
in Fruit Growing in MHSsachusetta." 
Prof. 1". C. Bssi 

No?. 17. ••Wimi i^ lbs Psrni 



T\ J Q arc supplied every year 

Kurpee s deeds iiir - v ", n " ,r :', A " ,cn 

■T can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? IF not, Wt would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a posted card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, a bright new book of 1 H2 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Building., Philadelphia 



F*a«:« f ^ JSiiot? 



tore 



■— Agciu v l»>r- 



HERMAN'S U.S. ARMY SHOES 

All psizea in ?loefc. 
KX1»I5KT K»I£1**\II*I"VC; 



School and College Photographers . . . 



ere far» t Greenwich, Ct. ; 10. Dr. 
vmsnAhlwtlof New York city; 17, Management Problem in Ifssssflka 
Mlliatn (\ Brown, former preanlent "ettn." Prof. Jiime. A. K<mrd. 
ew York Central railroad; Dec 1. !>•< I "What are the Civic Im- 
reMfknt Kenyon L. Batterfleld ; ; provement Problem* in Maasachn- 
.. Elmer A. 8te?en», Vice-Preai- ! sstli." Prof. Frank A. Waugh. 
•n of the Masaschnsetts Trust Com* The following name* have Iw-r-n 
»ny, Boaton. auggested for lli« program afler the 

i UMS r<» CTHOfSSATS ik i,r<turb holidayg and will be exiretitecl t« pre- 
COOSSSS in WM»Tfm. sent either actual achievements or 

I.. B. Haveaof tlw Boston Chamber priucipnlis in vol veil in the rural 
Commerce has been at the college problem: Prof. O. A. Morton, Prof. 
■ discuss plans for evening lecture K. L. Morgan, Prof, John Pbelan, 

I 




LOCALLY: 5 a Center St.. Northsmpton, Mass., 

sod South Hadley, Mass. 



Main Office : 

1546-154! Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the best ikillrrl 
artists snd mosi complete 

equip fm.nl ohtNinahle 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



•PKALRRS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 







The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 12, 1915. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



I'lihlinhed every Tuesday evening 
lis the Students "t the BfassSchtt- 
sells Agricultural College. 



HOARD OK KD1TOUS. 



TYI.KIt S. RXKiEBB 'IK. 

KM IIAK1> W. 8MITH '17. 

FRANK .1, SCHKI KKI.K 'In, 

THUS. I.. HAIfliOi KH 'in. 

Al.l'UKK A.OIUlOHA *1«, 

\>\\ KilIT K. IIAKNKS'l.i. 

Mil. HUM) I!. I.AWIIKMK 1 

KM, HIT IIKM»KHS«>N M7. |M-i«rtiiieiit Kdlt»r 

\\ 11,1,1AM S.W II.I.K. .IK. 17, < nmi.ns Kilitur 

HAROLD k.,ium;s'Ik, AJMVtoM Editor 

MARSHALL O. I.AM'IIKAit "in. AMo'a Sitter 



KUimr-liM hiff 

ManaithiK l.iliioi 

AHriMMl Killtor 

Athlftii- Editor 

Alblellc Kditiir 

Minimi Kilitnr 

Km Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

t IIAK. A. Ill N'riMi'K'N.IK.Ill. 
MERRILL P. WAKNKKI7. 

A.HNi«i;uit BoaineH Meaetet 

I.KSTKK K. HhlMMi 'IS. 

\il\ BTttsiW M;in.ii:i'i 

JAMES C POWELL tfc, < beattdm 



Subscription *i.:>n per year. Single 

copies, d rent*. Make all «mlei> DSySr 
1. 1.- to OH UU.KS \. Hi NTIxirroN, .li: 

i.iiti'ii-iiuM si hIm'Ihhh inniii-1 ;it the Amtenrt 

poet Ofliee. 



Vol. XXVI. Tuesday, Oct. 12. No. 4 



Til lack of any organized celebra- 
tion of the opening of the new 
Alumni Athletic field would have 
beta noticeable hud it not been for 
the victory over Colby last Saturday. 
Many younger alumni, recalling the 
pep that they used to show whenever 
any such great event look place, must 
have wondered what was lacking in 
the present undergraduate body. 

The real time for the dedication of 
the field will come in the not far dis- 
tant future when the gateway is com- 
pleted. In the meantime, the deep- 
seated appreciation and admiration 
of the field which all who lime been 
on it must possess may be shown in 
the practical way of continued finan- 
cial support and assistance in keep- 
ing it up to it* present state of 
perfection. 



P. J. Moyuihan *18 of Holyoke 
and J. P. Murrin 'IS of Dorchester 
have pledged Alpha Sigma Phi. 

• » * 
A new custom will he inaugurated 

in tomorrow's assembly when the 
exercise is opened by an organ pre- 
lude, followed by the singing of some 
Aggie songs, after which tbe speaker 
of the day will be introduced. This 
is a suggestion made by President 
Ilutterfield. 

• • » 

Many alumni were around campus 
over the week end. attending the 
opening of Alumni Field and also 
the Informal. ix>wry and Zahriskie 
'i:*», Hutchinson, Brown, Reed and 
Morse '14, Clark, Draper, Bull, 
Whitmore and Wilkins '15 and Davis 
'11, were among those who were 

back. 

• # • 

Owing to the fact that the number 
of copies of the CoLLBOIAR printed 
last week wsb 200 less than usual, 
some of the students were obliged to 
go without. The mailing list was not 
completed, and some copies were un- 
avoidably delayed in that manner ; 
but from now on the board expects 
all the copies to be delivered at the 
usual time, Wednesday. 

• • ♦ • 

William T. I.ivennore '17, of 
Lawrence, recently decided to dis- 
continue his studies at Aggie, and is 
planning to take up mechanical en- 
gineering at Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute. He left Amherst Sunday 
and has entered the Wentwortb In- 
stitute in Boston in order to obtain 
there certain prerequisite courses for 
his work at Worcester. He will join 
the freshman class at Tech at the 
beginning of tbe second semester 
next February. I'ntil then his ad- 
dress is 62 Thorndike street, Law- 
rence. 



ALUMNI NOTE 
•15 — "Kd" Bartlett after working 
for two days on the grounds depart- 
ment on the campus left suddenly to 
accept a position in Clevelsnd, Ohio, 
where he will work for A. D. Taylor, 
landscape architect. His position as 
assistant superintendent has been 
taken by "Joe" Pike who left a posi- 
tion in the engiueeiing department of 
the citv of Somerville to come here. 



CAMPUS NOTES 
( iwing to the resignation of Kut- 
ter '17, BfoOfhouM becomes manager 
of tennis. 

The talks in Monday morning 
chapel exercises for the next few 
weeks will be after the fashion of 
-. i nionettes given by President But- 
te i field relating to college life. 
• ♦ ♦ 

The pictures of the combined 
musical clubs, glee, mandolin and 
orchestra, were taken at White's 
studio Saturday morning. The 
("i.i.RGlAM board picture was taken 
Wednesday morning, awl the Uoister 
holsters* Saturday morning. 
« * « 

Professor Hurd of the Extension 
Hemes has returned from his trip to 
the exposition and tbe Canadian 
Northwest, Professor Hurd spent 
considerable time in Berkeley, Csl., 
attending conventions and meetings 
of associations concerned with 
agriculture. 



01 LAVAL 

SEPARATORS 

are the 

Most Economical 

"yoU j^et by far the greatest 
actual value for your money 
when you buy a De Laval — BE- 
CAUSE a De Laval will give you 
much better and longer SERVICE 
than any other cream separator. 

From the standpoint of its 
greater durability alone the De 
Laval is the most economical 
cream separator to buy, and when 
you also take into consideration 
its cleaner skimming, easier run- 
ning, greater capacity and less 
cost for repairs, tbe price of the 
"cheapest" machine on the mar- 
ket is most exorbitant compared 
with that of the De Laval. 

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR GO. 



• They're not ehort-lived 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 rifMeerj leran 
cows were officially tested 
which averaged Vi resus 
and 7 months of age. Their 
average milk production 
was 8617 pounds. Average 
butter fat, 387 pounds. One 
of these cows was over 18 
years old. 
Longevity, Constitution and Economic 
Production are Jersey characteristics. 

THF. ajmtCAN JEISET CATTU CLUB 

J24 W. 2M St.. New Yara City 




FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR OEPT. 



|gl IW<m<I»:i> 
Mil \<>i:h 



■ K. \lii<li-'ii Ht. 

« Mil M.M 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOF.MAN 

E. E.NHXETT 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

Couir.i Ibwbluv 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar String* 

AMHERST, IH ASK. 
Neat to Post Office. 

Amherst 

CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



MERRILL '17 EXPLAINS 

DEPUTATION WORK 

Interest Sought in this Important 
Activity of T. M . 0. A. 

In answer to several queries con- 
ceruing the nature of Deputation 
Work, the chairman of Deputation, 
Merrill' 17, offers the following ex- 
plnmttion. 

Deputation Work in one of tin 
several opportunities for genuine 
service which the Y. M. ('. A. has to 
offer. A so-called " team" consists 
of a group of students willing to give 
a portion of their time in the inter- 
ests of the boys of the rural commun- 
ity. Trips to towns requesting s 
visit from such a team an made 
during the week-end* of lbs winter 
season, leaving the campus on Hst- 
urday morning and returning Sunday 
evening. 

The purpose of deputation work is 
to awaken in tbe country boy tbe 
spirit of clean play and clean living, 
and also to give students an oppor- 
tunity to give to others something of 
the benefits which they have received. 



Rm*i.iM«» 1 

Stkimikn Lank Folqbr 

M AMfrA«fORINO JIBWSSL.SSK 

is.. KKtMDWAf, NEW YOKK 

CI.UH ASfD OOLLKOE 
PINH AMD RIN08 * 

UOl.O. MtLVWM AND BHOMIS at 



Shirts, 
Collars. • 
Cuffs, • 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



IO-IJC 

2 i-ac 
a i-ac 

48c per dot. 

30c per dot. 



l_OW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

Silts Cleaned. Pressed mm Dvm. All kinds « 
Repairing for Ladies and Gent feme* neatly done. 
Hig^erSe work b» fir.t ctasi tailor. Work 
SlfedloTafld delivered Sell tickets for - 

4 mm FOS a»* — 

1 KO 



CEORG 

Mais Street, A mhe*st. Mass, KmS Stock- 
On rear *»t t« the Pom Office Tat. •P'W 



UNITY CHURCH 

Nosth Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

1:1 ..1 1 \K SUNDAY SKKVICKAT1 P M. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN « DYER, Props. 
Loose -Leaf Note Books and Fountain 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c s Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $ 1.50 a Suit 

^Ij^HMMnBRMMMMMMMHIiB* 

K T. FaosT, Agent; D. Skehkyak, A»*t, Agef ' 

— Try enr ticket system — — 
PMt full name and address on laund r 



as. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Mow at 13 Pleasant St. 

f >i tilUl*' l*ro*t 1 tyt (mi* FilM. Broken Lent il 

Aeenrstety KepUwed. Flue Wsteh Repairing 
I'romptly andskitfnlly Done. 

^satisfaction Guaranteed 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Florlcultural DSft. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rate* 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season, 

OKOWN ON TNI CAMPUS 



WEBS' 



Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 
Good work speaks tor Itself. 
Nash Bock, Amherst, Ms; 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 12, 1915. 



F ESHMEN SPRING SURPRISE 

E feat Williston At Easthampton 
Saturday, 7 0. 

N'ineteen-nineteen sprang the sur- 
I *e of tbe season Saturday sfter- 
n <>n by defeating the strong Willis- 
n i foot hull team 7-0 in a eleanly 
p ived game. It was indeed a bril- 
liiDt victory for never before has an 
Aggie freBhman team been aide to 
overcome ber Easthampton rival. 
The winning scoie came in the first 
ijimrter. Ob a kick formation Lew- 
unlowski fumbled the ball. Before 
In could recover it, Whittle, the 
A ggie left end, had cut blm down. 
Mansell, who was rushing in, snatched 
up the ball and raced 35 yards for a 
totu'kdown. Gay kicked tbe goal. 

The freshmen outplayed their op- 
|K»ients in every stage of tbe game. 
Only once, in the third quarter, did 
Williston come as near as our In-yard 
line. Then she was easily stopped, 
however, for the Aggie team braced 
and held her for downs. Nineteen- 
nineteen, on the olber band, came 
i lose to scoring several times. When 
the whistle hlew at tbe end of tbe first 
■alf the freshman had tbe ball on 
Willision's 12 vhkI line with first 
down. Again at tbe close of tbe 
siiond half they bad first down on 
their opponents' 20 yard line. 

For the freshman Gay and Poole 
wt re especially strong on tbe offense. 
lime and again tbe former rushed the 
Williston line for gains of six or eight 
yards. Readio, at quarterback, 
pinked his plays cleverly and sent bis 
itiong backs through for good gains. 
Next Saturday the freshmen will 
play Chicopee high, runner up for the 
iDterscbolastic championship last 
year. Tbe game will be played on 
Alumni field. 

The line-up of Saturday's game : 

H v. ( . I1MU' WII.I.IHTn.V. 

Wliiitlp, M re, Hackofcn 

sextos, It rt, S|<ouii;i 

N I. It! rg. \\ ;t I la. •<• 

NH.iIIWOIhI. C <•. Iltull,'!' 

ra Ik> Aovau 

Hlsiiirhard, rl fli, Lewandowskl 

M»fiiM?lt, ri« It. i Kiinili'v 

ItetnUo. i|li le, Kane 

i Ilili .|l.. "»«!•. iin. in 

US) i lid rlil». ()(,,! litis 

l'<l fit lhl», (oillns 

>.mi,. Krenhn 7. WillintonU. Bah* 

NitiitloM — Williston, Sweeney for 
Hoi in, Kii w in for Kane, Sullivan fur 
< i»I ns. Touchdown — Mansell. (k*l 
fhi!- toiicbduwu — (iny. Keferee — l*er- 
kiti rtnplre— Jaekiton. Uneanen— 
'»« rne and (illbsrt. 



BOLT CROSS SATURDAY 

[ < '•>»<! in it f«l from pege I] 



II |- 

nun 

[.!» 

thr. 



tea? 
f 'bti 



On the defense, tbe team 

s like a machine. Kvery player 
lling up a fine sample of football 
ing only too well that s food 
>ei of subs will immediately re- 
tbem if thsy fail to come 
•gh. 

ter the good showing the team 

made so far this season, s big 

1 of alumni and followers of the 

are looked for Saturday, to 

tin- team on to victory. 



TICKETS NOW ON SALE 

FOR ZIEGFELD'S "FOLLIES" 

Aggie Night Celebration in Boston 
After the Tufts Game. 

An Aggie Night at the Colonial 
Theatre on the evening of the Tufts 
gume iti practically an assured thing, 
according to a letter received by 
Nicholson '16, from the manager of 
Zeigfeld's Follies. 

Seats will lie held by the theatre 
until October 23, when all reserva- 
tions made for the M. A C. sections 
must lie paid for. An accurate esti- 
mate of tbe nuinher of seats desired 
must he sent in by October 16, in or- 
der to give tbe managers an idea of 
the number that will he bought. 

Reservations may be made at once 
by purchasing from the management 
of tbe Roister Doisters advanc 
tickets, which may be exchanged by 
the holder for the corresponding 
Colonial Theatre tickets when they 
arrive. 

This is tbe first time that tbe col- 
lege has been able to secure such a 
concession. From the enthusiasm 
witb which tbe plan was originally 
accepted the evening promises to lie 
s memorable one in the history of the 
college. 

DR. EASTMAN TO 

LECTURE THURSDAY 

Seerley Lectures to Continue Every 
Other Week UntU Christmas. 

Thursday evening, Oct. 7, at trie* 
Dr. Seerley of Springfield Y. M. C. 
A. college gave his third lecture of 
the series on "The Psychology of 
the Sex Cjuestion," This third lec- 
ture covered the topic, " The Find- 
ing of Yourself." A large interest 
is being taken in this series as shown 
by the attendance on Thursday even- 
ing. Dr. Seerley was received, as 
usual, with enthusiasm. 

Announcement was made that Dr. 
Seerley's lectures will be continued 
every other Thursday evening to 
Christmas. For the meeting next 
week the Y. M. C. A. intends to 
procure Dr. Eastman, the Sious 
Indian lecturer. He will make an 
address on s subject relative to tbe 
I n.li:. n- in the west. 




ST0CKBRIDGE CLUB 
At a meeting of the Stock bridge 
Club in Room 6, Tuesday evening, 
the association was divided into 
three sections, similar to the arrange- 
ment agreed opon but year. With 
President Taber acting as chairman, 
several new officers were chosen 
sod the first business of the year 
transacted. Harold Nostrum was 
elected Secretary and Ryan and 
M.h.ik-;,. at the head of the poultry 
and animal husbandry sections, were 
made Vice-presidents of the associa- 
tion. The pomology section has not 
yet been organised. 

Columbia university is said to bavs 
nearly twenty thousand students con* 
nected with it at the present time. 



You'll have to h;iud it to us 

On Our New Made-to Measure Suits 

From $20 to S30 

Made .it 1 13 Fifth Ave.. \. Y, 

On Our New Ready io Wear Clothes 

r INKS I IN IHK WuRI.H 

On the fact that we have the experts in our own tailor shop to make any 

changes you may wish 

On Hand Tailored Suits, made in our own shop, from $32 to $45 
Fall Line Aquasculums Just Received— Patrick Mackinaws at Cost 

Campion, the College Outfitter 

Fine Tailoring- A ttterbury System Clothes of Fifth Ave. (Jents* Furnishings 

W. A SHERARD 

ME N'S STO RE 

Use Our New Cash Discount Card and Save Five Per Cent 



(IN 



SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to sec you. 




THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



PIPES 



A Large and Brand New Assortment of Popular Price 



JusL Arrived. Come in and look them over. 

PIPES 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexsll Store fin the Comer, 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 12, 1915. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 12, 1915. 



J. GINSBURO 

11 1-3 Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

75c Special Half Sole, Rubber 70c 
iv i e i *x i iv i .-ni« . 

Hlack, Tan, White Work cJuarantoert. 

PH1CI5I* 
k'ibber Soles . . , . • • •■»«» 

K libber Soles, with Heel* . . •1.75 

Holes Se«red, ...... W* 

•;■; shlniK fur ai.oo 



E.B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DKNTAL ROOMS 

Williams Mock, Amlurst, Mass. 

Office Hours. q to 12 a.m., 1-30 to 5 p.m. 



- I KAM Ki I'TINli. Telephone 59— R 

(9As PITTING, TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

specialty of Ke pairing 

< hukch Windows, Memorial 
Windows, Lkad Lights. &c. 

U Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS. 



PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATIONS 
IN APPLE PACKING 



NOTICE ! 

It is witli gnat pleasure that we announce the arrival of our new styles in 

Woolens and Fashions for Spring and Summer 

Included in our selection is a large assortment of 

Imported and Domestic Woolens and Gents' Furnishings 

Guaranteed t'abric* 

These cloths are made only for Merchant Tailors, and are well known for 

their individuality and t xdusivrms- of coloiinjjs ami deiigaS. 

Their quality is assured you hy the trade-mark stamped 

on the goods. I can fill your orders now on 

the latest goods and styles, and 

you can save a 

Discount of 20% on Every Dollar 

WHY NOT BUY NOW? 

Also Nn Finest Full Dress Suits.and Caps and Go/vnsfor Sale or Rent 

Suits for ladies and men remodeled, repaired, dye I. < leaned and pressed. 
We reaped f ally solicit your early inspection. 



Telephone 302W LABROVITZ " *m.ty 
Fine Tailoring and Qenta' Furnishings 
w, !.;«%. •»ama«*4 *at » Uwin h» A SM vwd mrti^W Miaatc 



Street 



Will be of Help to Farmers in Ob- 
serving New Law. 
The passage of the new law stand- 
ardizing the grading and packing of 
apples in Massachusetts, which will 
take effect July 1, 1916, has created ! 
a demand for information which will 
enable our growers to conform to the 
requirements of the law. The packing ( 
demonstrations in different sections 
of the State, under the auspices of 
the State Hoard of Agriculture, will 
help out considerably. To those 
who are anxious to seeure more com- 
prehensive instruction and who would 
like the opportunity of actually do- 
ing the work as well as of seeing it 
.lone, the annual One Week School 
of Apple Packing at Massachusetts 
Agriculture] College offer e a special 
opportunity. This school will be 
held Nov. 17*28 inclusive, ami will 
be open to both men and women. 
This school is under the personal 
direction of Prof. F. C. Sears. The 
work con Jsts of packing apples in 
boxes, barrels and fancy retail pack- 
ages. The students perform all the 
various operations. There will lie 
two lectures each day upon the vari- 
ous phases of orchaid care ami man- 
agement. Full details regarding the 
school can be secured llf writing the 
Supervisor Slioi t Courses. Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, Amherst, 
Mass. 



male figure which stands back of hit 
but who reaches forward to direc 
his attention to the better purpose 
Those who have seen the group gei 
erally agree that it is a very excel 
lent composition expressing vigor 
ously and beautifully an idea non- 
appropriate to the fiftieth anniversary 
It would seem that a permanent 
bronze group of this sort, and of 
such high artistic merit, would hi 
one of the most effective elemem 
in a commemorative celebration like 
that planned for 1917. Such a pier, 
of statuary by such a noted artist 
wotdd be famous all over the world 
and would make the college known 
for a ceutury to come. The problem 
comes before the committee how bo 
raise the necessary funds A em 
siderable amount will be required to 
carry out the design, secure tli<- 
bronze cast, and have it proper 
mounted in its place on the campn- 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 



the most economical you c«ui if«e. 

Better CROPS 

are the Ir»r%«i4l>le result. 



* H UBBARD COMPANY, Middletou n. Conn. 

rnihr Woifcii. |-»rtla»4. limn. 




COMMEMORATIVE STATUARY 

n oll«>Re Likely To Have Memorial 

Group At Anniversary. 





Huntington A*e., Exeter and Btagden Sts., Beaton, Mass, 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

amos H. WHIPPLE. *»wo#» 



Carpervter dt Morehouse, 
PRINTERS, 



No. i, Cook Place. 



Amherst, Mass. 



Now is the time to be planning for 



Fraternity Groups 

.. Have them oiken at 

MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 

■ . Northampton, Mass. 

44 Stale Street, r 



Among other plans for celebrating 
the fiftieth anniversary of the college 
in 1917 the committee in charge has 
a scheme for placing on the campus 
n group of memorial statuary. Pro- 
fessor Waitgh who is iu specie] 
charge of the matter has been in con- 
sultation with Mr. Daniel Cheater 
French, and has now iu hand a 
plaster sketch model for the prospec- 
tive group. 

Mr. French, besides being proba- 
bly the moat famous living sculptor 
in America has been available 
through his personal connection with 
the college. His father waa the first 
pre sident of M. A.C. (after whom 
French Hall was named), and Mr. 
I). C. French as a boy lived with his 
parents in the little Stc^kbridge 
House on the campus during his 
father's term aa picsident. These 
associations bave led Mr. French to 
offer his very valuable services prac- 
tically free for the commemorative 
statuary now under consideration. 

Mr. French's preliminary model, 
now on view in Professor WauglTs 
office, might be entitled -The Spirit 
of Civilization Directing Husbandry." 
It show * an athletic- young farmer at 
his plow, his face lifted to the vision 
of the future as pointed out to him 
by the Spirit of Civilization. The 
spirit is represented by a large fe- 



"PLUTO'S DAUGHTER" 

Many Score Books Still Waiting Foi 
Purchasers. 

The management of the ltoist. -i 
Doister Dramatic Society announces 
that there are quite a number of BOOM 
books of " Pluto's Daughter" still 
available. These books contain ill 
of the musical numbers of the eon. 
uieiiceinent show ami are very it- 
tractively hound with a aouvciin 
cover In order that the m*Mg< 
nnnt mas clean up the accounts f"i 
the year, it is hoped that th>- 
students and alumni of the college 
will buy their copies now. The pries 
of the entire libretto is ooe dollar 
They may lie obtained at the seme 
price by mail. Send orders to Jew 
T. Nicholson, llox 37, M. A. < 
Amherst, Mass. 



OLD ALUMNUS GIVES 

PHOTOGRAPHS TO LIBRARY 

Views of Campus Form Valuable Ad- 
dition to Historical Material 

The Library is indebted to Geo. ge 

A. Parker *76, for the gift of nimu 

photographs of the college groan -u. 

Mr. Parker, who Is at preaeot tbt 

Superintendent of Parks in Hartf" •!. 

Coon., engaged Id photography 

bobby daring the laat two years of 

his college coarse, and some of die 

finest examples of bis work are BO* 

in tin- bamla of the Librarian 

soon as practicable they will 

bound Into an album, form in 

highly desirable addition to the 

lection of college history mate 

The photographs include portrait 

President Clark and the facul< 

that time. The President's oft! 

shown as being located in lie 

Botanical Museum, now the ft 

building; there are several prin 

the drill hall and armory, whirl 

cupied a part of the early CI 

(now the Chemistry Lalioratorv 
the Commandant of that peri< 
shown in the military hendqm- 

in North College, 



; • 

Ml 

%\ 

of 
•1 

■ 

**rrt 

of 

(IT - 



0-ED PROBLEM NOW 

LOOMS UP LARGE 

Girl Students Form Aggie's First 
Sorority, Delta Phi Oamma 

Aggie's first sorority has been 

lined. The new society is to be 

iiown as Delta Phi Gumma, and it 

ill have aa charter members those 

* educational students at present 
living in Draper Hall. Formal rec- 
ognition from the faculty has not yet 

• eu received, because of the fact 
that all such matters shall be laid on 
the table by the faeulty meeting for 
a certain length of lime, but it is 
n-ported that President Butterfield is 
iu favor of the idea. 



NINETEEN THIRTEEN NOTES 
••Fuzzy" Drury writes that he is 

■ii sy and then some on the old farm 
hut that he is going to see a couple 
of football games this fall. How 

■■out it, thirteen, how many men are 
ws going to have at the Holy Cross 
game at Worcester this Saturday? 

••Dud" French has been doing the 
"..n.-una-Pacifir Exposition with 

Stan" Freeborn 1914. "Dud" 
writes that he is buying Holsteins 
for the schools and has about If 
•lays in California before going to 
Honolulu. 

Charlie Walker is in the lumber 
iiiisiness in his home town, Green- 
wich Village, Mass. 

Dean F. Baker was married Satur- 
day morning, Get. 9th, to Miss Alice 
M Petit of Amherst. Mr. and Mrs. 
Baker will reside at " The Presidio," 
17 Maplecourt, Brooklyn, N, Y. 
• Beany" is with the Brecht Co,, 176 
PeaH street. New York City. 



ALUMNI NOTES 
'U4. — C. P. Lounsbury, govern- 
in nt entomologist of British South 
Africa, ts visiting college. He is on 
a two years' leave of absence after a 
serious illnese. 

:<•"•• — H. A. Ballon, also a govern* 
uient entomologist for the British 
K-oerament. located in the West 
It dies, is on the campus. He Is 
studying here during his vacation. 

The Minnesota JfrirtirHUuriMt for 
>•, 1915, contains an attraetiTe 

"licle on "Thinning Fruit" by Rich- 
Wellington *fHi, asaistant profee- 

BO of horticulture in the I niversfly 
Minnesota. 

''n. — Yael is manager of the 

\ -i & Arcboro Co. near Roswell, 

V a Mexico, This project contains 

three sections and has I on acres in 

ing apples, Mr. Crosby (special 

13) who left Mexico recently 

r his health" Is at the same 

e in charge of some H<K) begs all 

" ntly given the serum treatment 

for cholera. 

'. H. I. l-'iske is stationed at 
le well with the Bureau of Knto- 
'<" gv on the Codling Moth Invest!- 
I*? on. 



'10.— J. P. Blaney has left 
Atascodero, Calif., and is now in 
Swampscott, Mass. He is registered 
for graduate work in Landscape 
Architecture at Harvard. 

'10, ---Professor Hesrv II. Fran- 
cis of the Landscape Intension Ser- 
vice of the College of Forestry at 
Syracuse, is Just completing a field 
study of the 390 mile highway which 
is being planned by the Massachu- 
setts Forestry Association and which 
will run from Boston westward nearly 
to the New York line and then turu 
back eastward to Cambridge. Pro- 
fessor Francis is preparing a com- 
prehensive report which will tell of 
present conditions along the high- 
way and which will suggest methods 
of henutifif ation best suited to con- 
ditions now existing aloug the route 
of the 300 mile circuit. The practi- 
cal work of these men during the 
past summer will be of great value 
to them in their teaching work in the 
College and will make it possible for 
them to bring the results of these 
studies into the practical work of 
their students. 

'13. — Harold Lyon, who is en- 
gaged in research work at the Boaoey 

Institute in Cambridge, has recently 
published iu "Psyche" two article* 
on the flea and the housefly. 

'14. — Ernest Upton has recently 
left the Civil Engineering Department 
of the citv of Salem to take up work i 
in the Naumkeag mills of that city. | 

'15. — K. S. Draper who is con- 
nected with John Nolen, city planner 
and landscape gardener of Cambridge 
left recently for Charlotte, N C. to 
take charge of the development of 
Myers' Perk embracing a tract of 
1000 acres. Although the project is 
already under way much of the dis- 
trict will be designed and treated 
ui.dei Draper's supervision He 

will act as personal representative 
and consultant of the firm on their 
southern jobs in the territory. Dra- 
per was elected this summer presi- 
dent of the Massachusetts chapter 
of the University Landscape Archi- 
tects* society, His address at Char- 
lotte will bo American Trust Co. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

In view of a recent bequest of 
•3,000,000, obeiiin ia thought to be 
the wealthiest college in the world, 
not considering the nniversttiea. 'The 
money was given by an alumnus, who 
bad made a fortune out of his disco \ 
ery that aluminum could be extracted 
from day. He invented the process 
while an undergraduate at Gberlin. 

The death of a Princeton freshman 
following a class rush is causing con- 
siderable readjustment of the univer- 
sity "customs." Ala meeting of the 
student body, It was voted to abolish 
all rushes for the present year at least. 
Similar action was taken at Lei and 
Stanford, where a student was killed 
in the "tank rush." 



COME OVER 
LET'S GET 
ACQUAINTED 




We are ready to sliow you everything that the college man 

needs for comfort in the way of clothes. Here are a few 

of our many offering*, and remember they are in 

every case the best of their kind. 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Beady Clothes 

In just the styles you're looking for — Four other good makes. 

MACKINAWS FROM $5 UP 

See the famous Patrick line before you get yours. 
We'll save you money. 

The Oakes Sweater is the best made at any price. 

THE PRICES ARE FROM $3 TO ST 

Absolutely pure wool and made to wear. 

COMPLETE LINES OF SCR HATS AND CAPS IN THE LATEST SHAPES AND C0L0RIN6S 




Exclusive Custom Tailoring at Pair Prices 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



/: 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 



N 



1QC7 THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD 
BO/ FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS 



1915 



Your Opportunity 

The editor of one of our leading agricul- 
tural papers writes us under date of January 
12th. 191 5, as follows:. 

"I am doing all I can to induce farmers to 
plant gram oops this year. 

"Gram is very high and it is going higher. 
Wheal is going to $2.00 per bushel and other 
grains will share in the advance. Wheal costs 
$2.50 per 100 pounds now, and pound for 
pound oats costaa much. 

" 1 1 teen* to me that die eastern farmer's 
salvation is to bey plant food and grow 
CORN, WHEAT, BARLEY, 
OATS AND BUCKWHEAT 

"Last fall I doubled my acreage of winter 
wheat and thai spring I shall triple the acreage 
of oats. I managed to produce 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre, end sold the straw at 
$ I 7.00 per Ion in the bam." 

THE OPPORTUNITY IS YOURS I 

Ba sure that you buy 

E . Frank C oe Fertilizers 

They are available plant foods that more Bum meet the most 
exacting requirements, giving plump, sound, full heads of gram and vigor- 
ous, healthy straw. 

Eastern users of E. Frank Coe Fertilizers are raising 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre. The average for the United Stales for three years 
is 1 41*0 bushels to the sere. 

THE OPTOsTTUNiTY IS YOURS I WILL YOU MAKE THE MOST OP IT ? 



u THE Coe-Mortimer Company, 51 Chambers St, N. Y. 






> \ ? • "%f 



v. 



l<* 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct, 12, 191 5- 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located yver post olfice. Up one riiijlit 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal ticket .System T«I.J&-M 

T. MIENTKA. 

5H0E STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday from 7-12. On your way to P.O. 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner ot HiIIim.ui and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is ■ modern hos- 
telry run on the European Flan. It is just a step 
Irom Main .Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in thecenUrof the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices Sl and up; rooms 
with bath (single) •l.BO and up. 

|U excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
100111 makes a meal a pleasant memory-eve^ 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
-.erved in the best possiole manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 

MikIiImimI Motel, s,.i inuli. III. BBSS, 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Oilers courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
depart. nents. which embrace the study of 

agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swat's 

Waterman's 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



Thirty-six dozen pens to select fr 



< 11. 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 



OUB RULE 

Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



ST 




RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AMD 

CARPET ROOMS 

t. D. MARSH ESTATE 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. PRESIDENT 
AMHERST. MASS. 



DEUEL S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



COX SONS 



— AND — 



JHra v ining 

7274 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'd Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, *-" 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteeu Hundred Sixteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Seveuteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 

(;. H. Chapman, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

S. W. Hall, President 

0. W. Moses, Manager 

A. W. Spaulding, Manager 

L). A. Ricker, Manager 

A. Huntington, Jr., Manager 

Moor house, Manager 

H. Aiken, President 

J. T. Nicholson, Manager 

F. A. Anderson, Manager 

L B. Fielding, Manager 

F. W. Mavo, Manager 

A. J. Hicks, President 

President 

C. H. Gould, President 

It. F. Taber, President 



WKNBBDU BOOK AttainTS. 
Both sexes, (or best seller published. Particular 

and outfit free. 
OICO. W. SOMKKN. l-S. St. A.igu.U..r, FU. 

Che Pheasant 

Bmtt v St., smbcrat 

Breakfast. Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged lor. 

Telephone 47° 

Rooms for Transients. 




CARS 



Leave AQQIE COLLEGE tor Mol • 
YOKE at II mln. past the hour. 



There are Seven (iood Kfi^n- B*f yomhould 
buy your 



CARS 



COAL 



or 



C. R, ELDER 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

37 Main St, Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

OoW ~i/v trwm r A. M * 4 <* M. 

RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton, MaMachirtcttS 

TWO BLOCKS FIOM TUB DKI-oT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with 

out extravagance.) More popular 

than ever. 

Special Luncheon I J— * P. M. 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

Ala Carte Service 
1 r»m e-JO U 1 1 P. M. 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatnelds, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Ml., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
••Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

SO Mile* of Trackage - flodern 
Equipment I rain dispatch- 
ing System - Freight sad Ex- 
press Service over entire Hoe. 

innecticut Valley Street Railway 

Comoam 



Leave AMHERST tor AOQIE COL- 
LEQE at 7 and 37 mln. post the hour. 



AMHERST I SUNDERLAND ST. II CO 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn st Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons. 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 



rn». *risi»i*a»Y pa» , ' ,)M 

ClMMlas ******* »«♦»•'«"« 
U«lcbMt Mrrl«, ■•*- Warfc, &•••** **" 
AH woik carahOjf *«-. .W stjfcjalajjw »ad 
dtllvtred. Gsattf •rww.it, a»v««» ,w 
coats. Ladtas' fa* lint* Mitt a •Pf*'- 1 '* 
^T«*M wW ei»l «WT *S» afM. A C 

gwr Hart Bl'». Amlawat. T» l No 3*» « 

THE 

Hoover & Smith Co. 

«i6 Chaatnot It., Philadelpb » 

Jewelers and Silversn -iths. 

Diamond lierehents 

PMtatf^Mat OffteW Ffitetilti i '•!« 



14x4-1476 Chestnut St. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



1PE0IALISTSIH 

Fraternity BsdfSS, FOBS, N •'«••* 

Silit a f*tjT |wa Prists. T nhl"* 

M.dal'a ...... Celleft Pint. r**# i*" 

RiBfS, Charms 





1 -*« 1 *, 




3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 



■i.iiIC*U"t» 



Vol. XXVI. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE: 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October k» toiv 



No. 5 



TECH COMES OUT WINNER 

IN CROSS COUNTRY RUN 

Wonderful Spurt at Finish Brings in 

Brown of M. I.T. Ahead of Aiken 

and Richards, 

Last Saturday the M. I. T. cross 
country H}Osd defeated tho Aggie 
teem bj i score of 2:1 tu 39 . M.I. 

T. was represented bv a well balanced 
1 >-:i in ami there is no doubt but what 

ihi'v deserved the victory. Brown of 

II. I. T. was the winner with a time 
of -7 10 {&a tea and thirty seconds. 
The course started st the Drill hall. 
■rent down around the barns, up the 
north side of the ravine to Flint labo- 
ratory and past the Chapel. From 

there on the oottrsc whs the same as 

in the inter-cluRs race of the week 
before. The distance is estimated at 
I.m miles. At the Chapel Richsnia 
was well in the lend with two other 
Aggie men following him. The p«».*i- 
liutns at the finish were: I'.rovvn. M. 
I. T. first; Aiken. If. A. ('. .second; 
Kichards, M. A. C. third; (iuetting. 
M. I. T. fourth; Parker, M. I. T. 
lifth; Hradley, Iff. I. T. Histh ; 
McYicker, M. I. T. seventh; Lyons. 

\l. A. C. eighth; Glorer,M. A. C 

niutli ; and Mitchell, eleveutli 

The ollieials were: Dickinson, 

tailer and referee; Flint, clerk of 

• titirse ; Laurtellotte, scorer : Coley, 

Lovejoy, Seheufele, judges; Kauoly, 

timer* 



STUDENT FORUM OFFERS 

CHANCE FOR DISCUSSION 



STOCK JUDGING TEAM 

TO GO OR FIRST TRIP 

Leave Friday to Judge Ayrahirea on 
Largs Vane near New York. 
Accompanied by Professor QttsJfe* 

the M. A. C. stock judging team will 

> nve on Friday for New York City 

and on Saturday will continue to 

Fort Chester. N. Y.. where they are 

Ml judge SOfM tine Ayrshire stock at 

-iiathglas Farms. Hugh Chisholm 

•f New York, the owner of these 

inn*, is reputed to have the beet 

terd of Ayrshire* in the country. 

!»• lmn invited all tin- New F.ngland 

gricultuml colleges 10 come to Fort 

hester Saturday ami take part in | 

tuck judging contest for which ap- 

ropriste cups, medals and other 

i ize« are to be awarded the winners. 

'lie team from this college will he 

iiiule up of the following men, all of 

tie class of 1916: Harold Aiken of 

■litlis, Louis Rowt of Melroie, A. 

ames Hicks of Norlhfii'ldt «nd Carl- 

>n M. ( ;mni of Sunderland. 



New System, Backed by Adelphia, 

Devotes One Assembly a Month 

to Student Problems. 

Aftet Dean Lewis had read the 
rules for tin- use of the Infirmary, 
last Wednesday's assembly was given 
over to a atudetit Forum, conducted 
by the Senate with the co-operation 
of Adelphia for the purpose of dis- 
cussing topics of interest to I lie men 
of II, A C. The plan is to have one 
of these meetings each immtli. and to 
liav v as large a number of students an : 
p ossi ble take part in the discussions. 

Hoses '16 opened the discussion by 
advocating ■ change iii the arrange 

neeoti of meals at the Dinning Hall. 
Contending that the present method ' 

of nerving ■ heavy meal at noon and 
a lighter one at night did not rQos 
the fellows suilleieul time at the noon 
hour and that it was detrimental to 
their state of mind for the fn-t two 
hours of the afternoon, Moses sug- 
gested that a lunch be offered at mid* I 
dav and that the piesent dinner In- 
served at night Tblti plau, he said, 
had iieennsed bj Dr. Brides in train- 
ing tlii"i year's football squad and it** 
excellent ic-.nl* have already b. •• Q 
nhowu in the Strong physical eordi- 
tioli of tlie men. Mr- Hicks spoke , 
briefly, saying that he highly approved 
of it ami hoped it would be put 
through, Nicholson '1<> and Schlot- 
fei lieek.tlie present head waiter at the 
dining hall, were in favor ami -aid 
that everyone was apparently agreea- 
ble to the idea except Ml Chsstej, 

the cbef, who declared it would cense I 
trouble with his help and pio'.tahlv 
would slightly increase the cosl oil 
board. Mo*ti«mj'H) made tin- motion 
that the senate try to arrange with 
Treasurer Kenneyand Mr. Chesli!* in 

interchange the supper and dinner 
meals as served at present, having h 
lunch Sl noon and dinner at night, 
provided it would not necesitate |0 
increase hi price of l.oatd. lie 
motion wa* easily earrieil. 



FRESHMAN CLASS MEETING 

A short meeting of 1 i* 1 * » STM held 

imme«liately after the hvgiem i 
on Wednesday for the purpose of 
electing' class inanageiH. Cbestei I. 
Chase waa elected for manager of 

freshman football and Frederic Schen* 

kelliergei as manager of the freshman 
ciuMg-coiuitrv team. 



RUSHING SEASON ENDS WITH 
MANY FRESHMEN PLEDGED 

Though Number, Eighty-Six, is Small 

in Proportion to Size of 

Class. 

After i most successful rushing 
season, eighty-six men of the class 
of 1919 were pledged to the nine fra- 

ternities of the college after chapel 
Moiidav moriiih. Though there 

was :i good deal of keen rivalry ovei 

some of the men, the rules of the 
fraternity conference were strictly 
obeyed. The list of the pledged 

men follows : 

<,'. I. V. 

Elliot M. nullum Waban 

Arthur M. MeCarlv Moiimmi 

Fdward F, Parson* Not til Amln'ist 

George A. .Sampson Atlston 

Kenneth I, Wlltlamt Sundeilauil 

cm MUM \ R \ft' v 

George Anderson Somerville 

i'.oland South BostOfl 

l», n il I ' • I «H U | h 

Harry G ( arlej We-.t Newton 

Robert D. t hifholin Boston 

. lames 1*. Dav ies ( attbttdgC 

Paul Faxon Wt sl Muwton 

llowatd If, tloll I. ven It 

i ,. , •■ f 'ampbelt lialtimoi • . Md. 

Kltou -i . Mansell I win klge 

Donald Ross Arlington 

Clirb. id A. Howe K. Orange, N. .1. 

CI once I*. Whittle \\ '. vi lh 

K vim v -i". vi \ 

Carlton D. Blancbard I abridge 

George K Blanchsnl Alungton 

Hall B. ( aijietiter s.iiiierville 

Mvrton I Kvans \\ . -t Houietvtlle 
Melvin w. i iDrshiu l> nn 

I .« in ge I larding SoMCI I ille 

Louis D Hastings SprittgheW 

( bester W. Martin Orange 

Fat! A Morgan \ >liet -I 

Allan I. Fond Uolliston 

Fverett II Ski u tier H f est (fpton 

.lolin S. stoeUbiiil. Atlanta. I'm. 

Harold I.. KpauUling Hopedsle 

F.i i,. || I'. Wood M ndon 

k \ civ a oiv v nil 
Alfred Itooth '17 Mn h il. town. \ 4 i 
Ua«, mond Copelrmd II del'iok 

John F. Cnlhimui Doreheslei 

MaUolm W. Clm*. Auiaubmv 



i ,. raid 



M, r.illiuau 



W*e*t Warre 



re ii 



Howard M. Hamilton Wimliestfi 

Bdson T. Jones llosliuttale 

Kugeite A. IfeGIven Lynn 

Arthur B. Montgon. Dedbsm 

Howard C. Wi!li8 A u-t 

•inn. •( "ii 1'iu" 



HOLY CROSS, OUTPLAYED, 

HOLDS AGGIE TO 7-7 TIE 

Purple Team Coiner. Biiek in Last 

Quarter, After Being Held 7-0 lor 

Almost Entire Game. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural 
College football team met the Holv 
Cross eleven on Fit ton Field, Wor- 
eester, last Saturday, and after wag- 
ing u furious battle n ud completely 
on [classing their rivals in every de- 
partment tif the game , came out with 
only a tie score. 7 to 7. It vvu* tt 
combination of Holy Cross getting 
the lueaUs ami an Incompetent t>ilic- 

ial that saved the day for the Purple. 
u\ii ,i<m) Aggie supporters left the 
lield knowing that tin* Maroon and 
While was hv far the supet iot and a 
in t.i P score would have been a jasl 
coinpal isoii of Hie team*, 

l.i justice to Holv (toss it must be 
said that the) started one of the great- 
est comebacks ever seen at Fittou 

i. With Imt four m, mites to 

the weak *|Mit iii the liae and by 
Steady Une plunging they ndvnn- 
Iheball to i ggies 2*) yard line. A 
fni waul pass which Mr! ai thy barely 
resched gave the home team a touch 
down which resulted In tying the 
Score. This was the onl\ time dur- 
ing I be game that Holv ( rOSf showeil 
any aggi es«n elies* ; i»*»foiM this, 
their plays were sineiued at t !»*■ v> 
■tart and their much heralded fot - 
ward passes went for naught 

The Aggie lean, rushed the ball 
f nil v ISO yard*, while Holy Cruaa 
made a watil 'J-> Vaids. Heiiida* thin, 
the I'uiple made but fi flrnt downa 
while the Marootl Hid White Moored 

i . 1 1 was a baii !■ I with Cap* 

tain I iinaii. Darting and Weeks 
!,i aring ">• greater pall of it. Cap- 
tain I ill l an was the hhiljilig light 
of the game Although iibwI repeat- 
eillv on a skin tackle plav. DO Olie 
COII hi slop him ; he was the nfeadiest 
and most consistent gioiind gHMter 
thai Aggie had; Darling played a 
great Kami on theoffunse, Ins spect' 
i. • 1 1 tit dodging and rnnniiig calling 
forth repeated cheers from the loyal 
SUpUOrterSt Twice be crossed the 
opponents goal line, yit each lime 
the ball was brought buck and Aggie 
penalized. Ferry p]aveda*t 

on the defense \ his mtvh- of plav 
worried the op|MMing tpiarterback 
.•,.(% minute of the game. I%vei 
varaitN ulavei put up a sterling 
I game : vet something was lacking. 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 19, if) 15. 






(.rayson and Duuu, both takeu out 
early in the game, left large holes 
that could not be tilled. 

Holy Cross had a fine defense for 
our Minnesota shift, but theiroffense 
failed to get by our line. Twitchell, 
who replaced Devlin at quarterback, 
played a fine game, being directly 
responsible for Holy Cross's 7 points. 
This should not have counted how- 
ever, as the referee failed in his 
official capacity ; although the head- 
linesman reported the presence of IS 
men on the field at the time that the 
touchdown was made, he failed to 
heed it— to Aggie's sorrow. 

The game by periods : 

kiust ratiopi 

Holy Cross won the toss and chose 
to kick off, Aggie playing with the 
sun at their backs. Weeks caught 
the ball under the goal posts and ad- 
vanced it 12 yards. Weeks made 3 
yards through center ami Curran 
made 7 more and tirstdownoff tackle. 
Darling, Weeks aud Currau advanced 
the ball 6 yards on the next three 
plays and Palmer punted, IMaisted 
nailing Devlin in his tracks. Holy 
Cross made 1 yard through center, 
Dunn was hurt on the play and Hut- 
trick replaced him at guard. Dev- 
lin punted to Aggie's 45 yard line. 
the visitors makiug 10 yards on the 
exchange of punts. Currau liiim- 
ineied the line for 8 yards aud then 
i\ more for fust down. Palmer gained 
4 yards on a fake line plunge and 
Darliug netted 1 yards around end. 
Weeks plowed the center of the Hoe 
and made first down. Holy Cross 
stiffened and the ball went to them 
on downs. After making one yard 
through center Cray son threw l-ol.v 
for a 1 yard loss and Holy Cross 
punted. With the ball in midlield, 
Aggie marched dowu the field for 
their first touchdown. Curran slid off 
tackle for 7 yards and Darling got 
the necessary distance for first down. 
Time was up and the teams reverted 
sides. 

BaOOMD rRRioi». 



Palmer hurled I splendid forward 
to Day who crossed the goal for a 
touchdown. Palmer making the score 
7 when he kicked the goal. 

The kiekotr went behind the goal 
line and Aggie brought the ball in 
play on their 20 yard line. Darling 
broke through for SO yards before he 
was brought down. This resulted in 
nothing, however, as the Maroon and 
White was penalized Ifi yards, 
C rayson and Devlin being the offend- 
ers and they were forced to hwe the 
field. Sauter replaced Grayson at 
end. Bradley circled left end for 
Holy Cross' first down. This was 
tried again, but Cnrran stopped the 
play for a 4-yard low. Darling in- 
tercepted a forward pass and Aggie 
was again penalized 15 yards. 
Palmer punted and after failing to 
pierce the Aggie line, Holy Cross at- 
tempted a forward pass which Cm 
ran intercepted. Cnrran went through 



for 6 yards, bat another penalty of 
15 yards was inflicted upon the Ma- 
roon and White. Palmer tried two 
forwards and then punted. Jordan, 
playing end, threw Bradley for an 8- 
yaid loss, aud Day repeated by nail- 
ing Foley foi a 2-yard loss. Perry 
broke through the line aud stopped the 
next play before it was started and 
Holy Cross punted. Weeks made 4 
yards through center and Currau cir- 
cled right end for 18 yards and first 
dowu. Darling gained 14 yards 
around left end, and Palmer signaled 
for a field goal. The ball went wide 
and the half was over. 

I11IKO I'EHIOO 

Aggie brought the ball in play on 
the 20-yard line. Curran Bade 5 
yards and Weeks 3 more thru center. 
Darling advanced the ball yards, 
but a forward failed and Palmer 
punted. Holy Cross failed to gain 
around right end and Perry and Dan- 
forth threw the opposing backs for 
losses on the next two plays. Holy 
Cross punted to the 12-yard line. 
Curran hammered right tackle for ."» 
yards and Palmer made first down 
through center. Darling slid around 
end for "> yards and Weeks made it 
first down on a forward pass. Cur- 
ian netted 2 yards but Weeks broke 
through for «> yards. Aggie was pen- 
alized 5 yards for offside. Weeks 
made I yards thru center, and ( ui- 
ran added •'• more around end. The 
Maioon and White was again pen- 
alized and Palmer punted. Holy 

Cr-^s failed to gain tboragjh the Hue 
on the next three plays and then punt- 
ed to Darling who returned it 1«» 
vards. The period ended with the 
ball io Aggie's possession in mid-field. 

IOI Kill I'KKJOI. 

Weeks made 5 yards through guard 
and Darling made 3 around end. 
(nil an made 7 yards but Aggie was 
penalized 15 yards for holding. 
(ni ran broke through for 9 yards and 
Weeks caught a forward for a 5-yard 
gain. Weeks pulled off a 20-yard 
run and Cnrran sailed through tackle 
for 12 more. Aggie was again pen- 
alized and the ball went to Holy 
Cross on their 20-yard line. 

Now Holy Crow started its great 
comeback. Bradley hammered the 
line for Ifi yards in three downs ami 
Foley added _' more. The Aggies 
were offside and a 5-yard penalty 
helped the Purple. Kelley went 
through for 8 yards and Foley made 
first down. Kelley again broke through 
for 6 yards and another 5-yard pen- 
alty aided the Holy Cross team. With 
the ball on the 25-yard line, Twitch- 
ell hurled a forward U) McCarthy 
who scored the touchdown. 

Palmer ended the gnme with a 75- 
yard punt. 

The lineup and summary l 

I1AI.1 PBttSH M s • ' ■ 

McCarthy. I« P», D«y 

n( .Mifiiii. It it, pattfortk 

: I.Muli, la Wi I ''inn. OHttrh'k 

cook. Inderson, ■- e, Perrj 

uKeefe, r| lu. .Ionian. WrU-ck. ltui-k 

Zimmerman, rl It, riainU'd 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 19, 1915. 



Why Not Board at the 
College Commons ? 



Run at Cost for the Benefit of the 

Students 



Good Food Furnished 
at $4.20 a Week 



Lunch Room With a la Carte Service 

in Connection 



i" 



More Feed Per Acre 

The cost of producing meat or milk would be much 
kn if it rerjui red 1cm acres to produce the feed. 

Both the quantity and quality of the feed improve 
when the right plant foods are used to wppleiaefit the 
manure and ekiver* They improre enough to yield & 
handsome profit on the expenditure. 

The right plant food includes enough * 

POTASH 

In availaMe form. Supplement the manure imd phosphate 
with 50 to too pounds of Muriate of I'nt.i.h, or 200 to 40B 
{Hiunds of k.iinii, per acre, and you will raise big corn and 
fine clover after the grain and at the same time improve 
the fertility of the nil. 

Try Potash whs alone on the swamp land pasture and note the 
clover and good grasses crowd out the wild hay. Write urn for 
prices of Potash, one bag up. 

Tor* 



I. isoii. Wiuult'Kwortii, n- the morning air, started for the IJ. & 

U-. .Ionian. Banter, Ciraytioa j m. station to give "that team" a royal 



v tin, Twitt-htdl. i|ii i|b, Palmer 

ley, Hiley, lhl> rlil». Darling 

iidley, Haley. rhl> lhl>. Cumin 

irh'.v, Kelley, fb fi». Weeks 

Score— Holy Crow 7. M. A. C. 7. 
■ui-ImIowuk — Day, McCarthy. Goal a 
mi touchdowns — Palmer, McCarthy. 



send-off. 1 » v the time the common 
was reavhed, however, the line had 
greatly increased in length nnd a 
rousing cheer was given for the team 
and the "cap." The band, what 
there was of it, made a feeble noise 



1 inpite-Oaeael. lleferee - Bvirke, 1 whic , b mryed to k the rooter8iD 

\ l\ 1. I.iiieHiuan-liutler. W. II. 8. 



it- luiir Ill-minute periods. 

RUSHING SEASON ENDS 

[1 nntiniM-il from |KUfe 1] 



I i-tsell H. Wheeler Newtown, Conn. 
\ land J. Wiug Hawthorne 

ItKIA KAI'I'A Pill 

\ I. tor Katista Havana, Cuba 

Willis B. Cone Mittineague 

Klstofl A. Day Northbridge 

Louis E. Morse, Jr., No. Attleboro 

II Mold W. Poole Hudson 
|{oger Readio Florence 
Joha H. Small wood Paterson, N. .1. 
Richard A. Wait.- Middlefield 

TIIKTA (III 

William H. linker Chesterfield 

Sarouel C. Itartlett Colerain 

i nicis M. Clark Oxford 

Holier* K. Collins Rockland 

Lawrence W. day flroton 

Wilfred A. Hathaway Taunton 

Karl .1. Pi ot: lirookline 

mgma I'm EP-n.os 

Horace G. Man-hunt '17 Cambridge 

I raocliJ (/Heron 'I* Milton 

1'itul T. Krigham Leominister 
.l.isfpli A. Chadbiirue 

Great Harrington 

Arthur I., ("handle Leominster 

Alfred K. Cosl.v Westfleld 

( I: iilcs (). Dunl.ar W.-st field 

William K. Calvin Wenham 

I ieorge H. Howland 

Mclroae HighhindN 
W Mian C. King Siilliuld, Conn, 

Charles 6. Mattoon Pittsfleld 

I' nst K. Montgomery 

K. Orange, N. J. 

II old M, Rice Kensington, Conn. 
Kroeat K. Sexton Darien, Conn. 
George L. White van DeMenville 

I Dgaton Wright (Juincy 

l.\MI'.l.\ <||| ALPHA 

l> n W. Alden Proctor, Vt. 

William A. I taker Melrose 

Morton H, Cassitly Bast Boston 

A, Warren Clapp East Braintreo 

II ei 1). ' 1 muling Bradford 
Reginald .1. hklmonds Roelindale 
Richard 8. Holmgren East Lynn 
II »ld R. Mat Donald linzzanln Bay 

AI.PIIV -IOM\ Pill 

II Id R. Hay Hopedale 

N Iter 1). Graves Brooklinc 

l 1 It. Field Sharon 

I .:• reset W. Jobnaon Avon 

Al 1 G. Kennedy * Milford 

I ■'■-. v 1). Peterson New York 



step at times 



TEAM GIVEN SEND-OFF 

Many weary heads were drawn 

( i- under the bed-clothes Saturday 

"i' ing at o'clock, and a sleepy 

1 gathered for breakfast at 0-46, 

1 ' >y 7- 1 o everyone was wide awake 

with the drum heating, the por- 

>f the students who dared brave 



FRESHMEN SMOTHER 

CHICOPEE HIGH 64 o 
Have No Difficulty In Outrushing 
Light Opponents And Score Often 

Chicopee High, runner up for all 
interscholastic honors last year, 
proved easy picking for the fresh- 
men, Saturday, the final score stand- 
ing 64-0 in favor of 1919. Chicopee 
presented a very light team and was 
easily rushed off her feet by her heavy 
opponents. Only once did she get 
first downs and then only in the first 
minute of play. The freshmen, on 
the other hand, were not forced to 
punt once. The game was played on 
Alumni field before a crowd of 700. 

Though the freshmen scored one 
touchdown in the first quarter, they 
did not iie^m in earnest until the 
second. Then they registered twenty- 
five points in rapid succession on 
touchdowns l»y Whittle, Pond, and 
(Jay. Aggie's interference was ex- 
cellent, while Chicopee handled the 
ball poorly. The feature play «a* 
furnished when Whittle received u 
Chicopee pnut mid raced 'i0 yards 
through a broken field for a score, 
Poole pulled about the tattle stunt in 
the thirtl ijiiartci when on the second 
play he carried the pigskin .V» yard* 
for a touchdown. Pond and Munsell 
also wored in this quarter. Two 
more touchdowns were registered in 
the last quarter ami then the slaugh- 
ter ceased. 

Throughout lite game tin- work of 
the heavy freshmen back field free 
especially noticeable. Their plttp gee 
through center and runs around end 
always netted long gains. Saturday 
afternoon they will have opportunity 
to try out their skill against I>eei field 
Academy on Alumni field. 

The lineup : 
nusawKSff, ettfuoPM rihi, 

I'iniIi'V, K, WimmI , I 



BniUni. 
o. Wood, it 
Sicxioii, la 

SniallwiMiit. <• 
Day, Boad, r» 
EMancbard, n 

MaiisHI. re 
Whittle. <|l. 
Pool. Mil. 
Hay, rhl> 
Pond II- 



If. 



le. lichen 



It, Shaw 

\g, Htm is 

e, P« -rr> 
ry. Wiiuhl, Honilaid 

ri. Lena 
re. Uncurl 

<|h. Hriuu'n 
I hit. .Irrgprewm 

rl.l., Sciliu-aii 

fh. Wnoda 



Sc«»rf — Frenhtueii «»t, t'hte opeo High •» 
Tonehd«wna— Whittle :i. I'ihiI a, Potttl i 
(Jay '£, Mansell. (»«mln from much 
dowiin <»ay 1- Heferee — tfuhbsrtf. 
l.'ni|ilrr— MclilottHrWek "1*1. M nosr nen 
— Warrpn and Andenton. TIiiht — 
Warren, 






It U rumored that congratulations 
are In order for Stanley M. Prouty 
*16. 



KmtA m, IBM Kt> 1HI1U 

Stmi'iikn Lank FottQSB 

MtMTAlTI'HI.Nd JKWBl.KK 

IMi> IIKIWDWAY, NKW VOHX 

oi>iri» and 0014UKQX 
PINS AMI KINCJH .■* 

OOI.lt, hii.vuh AMD miiiin/i.: MilMLB 



ONE 



YEARS SUPPLY 
OF MAGAZINES 



10c 



An Especially (iinni Commission Pronosltton — 

Cas.li fin test nrdsts— Article widely Aclv*rti*#d— 
Cuts down pseense Is powt't 1 lint* — Addrens 

Kni.ineiihini; Sui*i«i% Co., *Jt8 N. ytli Mreet, 

l'lll!.t,lrl,.|,l... Pi. 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 



loMwrsot Wrought Iron and Bras* Pip** Valvei 

....I I.'. >t. I... Ei M',.*.^ .....I J ' * A .1«A.*«. 




nfl Vnil VNniAf < u ^ h«»anrth <<f |>»ibltsh*r* 
W iuu anun W(Mlll | |„. B j^ tos«nd you ;. 

frrc nn in pic 1 "P.v ni iliiir Muuii/iui- If th«) mils 

knew S..IH inwf I» is «tir buiinet* to fur- 

IIIKll ihiIiIhIii'I- iilllv nltll till' il.ilnr- nt illtilli 

itfiii magazine ^*o»rs. If ><mi »iil writs jmii 
mil addrwM VERY plain and wad n-- ONLY 10 
rents in silvers or monej order we will send 
yi'iir iKiini' tn several hundred liu tills IipPb within 
,1 war. «iiuwill hhiuI y»ti FREE sample pontes 
nf hundreds >y*s, several htindrrds) nr iUm hwd 
Inil stnmlmil Muuii/ini"», I- unit p;i|tei'K, I'miliis 
.loo nut In, story MstfaKlnes, Reviews and Weeklj 
Papers, Mat! Order ami Trade I'uIpIi. .it nm>. 
lloiiHeki-eplnu Mitmudnew, Kashlnn .Imiiiiiili, 
HltiKtrated MagnUMI and in fait hIhiiii all 
liiinN nf liiuli-^tatle intrrentlnu inaua/lncN eoln- 
inu to >ou in must c\eiy mail (or omm ,i \ear. 
ami all toi ONLY 10 rentii in silver). 



WE-DO-AS-WE-SAY 

Ml if ml a ullter dime St «nre ami ymii name 
w ill gn on niir next timtith'x elrentiitlttii llitt ami 
yon will he gTOStrl «iirpr1scd at the remili- M 
i» S ssellin sou that you will lie more II, an well 
■leased with the Msnall ln*estment. And yen 
WILL NEVER regret it. vddress the Maas/lne 
I'trcutatlnii 1 o . It"< v.mii. Ibwton. I . H. A < ii 
.ni Hint: lit-nt. |i:m. DON'T fail t>. h rite YOUR 
full itililti -- EXTRA plain W« hmc mHMeihiiiu 
in ofiire for yott— as a r»«al Mirtirtse^'ir jrun will 
ptnnar let as know In what iwiicr yun mtw thin 
advertisement . 



. ' 111 1 1 .11 n pi > 1 1 n ,-iirrtlll dim mil IIHUi ur4iili|j 

Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Bailer and Fiifjirt 
Connection!. Holyefce, Mm. 



lUXK.MAWS 

Candies and Ice Cream 



** HAMP« 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Out Specialty — And other good 'things to eat. 
MKS. I . M. SI l.lililNS. 

Middle Street, Hadley, M.tss. 

Tel. 415 W 

DR. R. C. BANGS 

Dentist 

NASH'S BLOCK 

Kvetiing* hv Annaintment. 

hold Ularrcn 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T, si, AMI M (M MANACCN 



T\ ^ C 1 are supplied every yrar 

Kurpee s oeeds direct , to »°™ . Ameri - 

* can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow** ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee* 
Annual for 1914,— a bright new book of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO. , Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 



nu;eVs ^iioo Store 

— Agency for — 

HERMAN'S U.S. ARMY SHOES 

All sizt'i in ptock. 
_KXi»BHT KUI'/MKING 



School and college pDotograpbers . . . 




LOCALLK: 5* Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and Sooth Hadley, Masa. 

Thrsc Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



Main Office: 

1546-1S4S Broadway, 

New York €it? 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



[JKALF.RK IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct, 19, I9'5- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 19, 191 5. 



5 



THE MASSACIilSETTS COLLEGIAN 

published i'v.-i> Tih-mIus evenins 
l,v 1 In- Student* of 1 In- Massm-liH- 
netts Auririili nral College. 



BOA III) «>l' - KIHIOUS. 
iai.ki; s. i:im.i,i;s in, BSHoMh-i bief 

|;|<'UM!I> W. SMITH IT. M.iiiauinu Kditor 

I l:\M\ .1. (H'HKI I 1 I I 1' wiM;>ni Briltor 
rims. 1.. 11 \i;i:im k~ W Mi.i.ii. BdlUM 
Ml i;l H A.MIOHMA I*. MlilHtfr Mii.ii 
|.\\ li.ll I I HARNKH li.. \l.imni Editor 
Mill olio i;. LAW i:i,M K'l". Nwi I..I11.1 
II. I. HIT lll-.MU-.l:>o\ I'- Ki-1'.iHiii.ii! Wltltl 
\\ I I.I.I \M >VN I 1. 1. 1.. .Ml .17. « .iiiil.ti-. l.iHlMl 

II \uiii.i> 1. JONKS '!». *--• " '•'"" ' ,lh '" 
VIA USUAL! 11 i.wriu.vi; t-. \--> •■ » ■i' 1 " 1 

BUSIXK88 DEPARTMENT. 

i nAfl v in MiMnnN.n;. lit. 

HusinwM Msnwscr 

Ml BRILL I', w MJM.un. 

A«MM,iMt HonlneM Msnmrei 

I.KSTI'.K K. III.I.IHM. '!• ■ 

vih .Mi mm m 
., v\n,si i'"\v 11.1 I- 1 IrcnUitlon 



Sttltseripth'u S1.00 pet year. Single 
copies, B wni*. M»k« sH urdew pays 

1,1,. 1,, 1 11 \i:i 1 - \ Hi X rtXtmiS, JR. 

I.nl.'i.-il.i- ISCUnd ' l«« '"■""'' ■" I'"' V'i'li-'-' 

Pom "I' 1 

Vol. XXVI. Tuesday, Oct. 19. No. 5 



K<,.| limn stlOOtittg on lb* rumpus 

is hardly ■ spoil to be indulged In 
i,v student* of iiiis college. Thai ■ 
freshman »rss oliserved doing this 

Monday s|ii':iks very poorly fOf Ilis 
thoUghtfnlne-s MHJ sportsmanship. 

Everyone irho has lived no the oen> 
pus any length «<f time bni 1 friendh 
feeting for thene tome animals, and 
would strongly reneni an| harm done 
then, should 11 repetition of this 
offence be discovered i<»- draetic 
action bj the students cnnnol be 
mggaated. 



An km niching season i- over. 

ryonc breathed a great sigh of 

relief after tin' pledging was over 
Monday. f«»i the straggle of competi- 
tion has kept every fraternity man in 
a stale of tension. §*■ sharp com- 
petition »e existed this year appar- 
eotly tended towards considerable 
ill feeling among certain of the «o- 
eietiea f and even roroo™ or "miid- 
slinging'* were heard. Thai iny 
amount of rivalry SSOOM CSOSfl 
breaches of friendly relations, or 
arouse pe npal snimositiea is alto- 
aether Bodeslrnble, f»»i after all, 
what ia a rushing season hfli M opes 
competition between the fraternities 
which should be conducted In W 

honorable iilttiiiH-! ! Ilut now Wt iaii 

thiuk of ohnWf uiter-fniternUy rela- 
UoM, Thftre i« e»«"| rmmm foi 
more l*reqneni ftsiMng among the 
melt in the various Bouseat in for 
Bjore corili.iliiy between ihe organi- 

/.:iti<Mi>* u.- a whole. That mi'mU-r- 
wliip In one fraternity ahould lt««D n 
luan's welconM in some other doom 
ioem«al»Hurd. tnterfraternity spwts, 
not only in baseball but li 
track, fencing, or boekey, interfrn- 
^rnitv nartie»i nnd ptwsibly dances, 
would undoubtedly tend towsrd bet- 
ter mutual feeling* sml any action 
proposed towanl ttde end ii n step in 

tlie riglit -liieitioii. 



Al'IMHH'lUATK tO tile flusillg of tile 

rushing season is en editorial we clip 
from a recent isate of the Dartmouth, 
which contains much food for thought 
on the pert of all new men We 

print it helow, feeling incapable of 

better expression the thoughts. It 
was entitled. "Don't make Mountains 
out of Mole Hills." 

••In confusion of mind which seces* 
sarilv accompanies the abrupt transi- 
tion from School tO college, new men 

are apt tosel down In the wrong pro- 
portions the commonest Institutions 

Of college life. The freshman who 
fails to make a fraternity, for in- 
stance, in the open uishing season, 

often aondere whether after all life 

lias anything in store for him. Be 
may even ipiestion his chance of 

achieving any success in college, and 
concludes that be baa been tossed to 
ne side as unfit. With much the 

same mental process, the smooth 

young man who has been assailed by 
fervid oratory from six or eight of the 

eighteen chapters here, may readily 
convince himself that lie has at Inst 
won life's choicest piiz< — I chance to 
., || undisturbed on his laurels, an 
ornament tO the arm-cliaii ■ of liis fra- 
ternity bouse. 

Of course, botfa nien an- wrong. 

There is do small number of nun in 
the upper classes whohavewon im- 
portant positions in the student body 
aj non-fiateinity men. And there is 

also no small number who have dis- 
counted tln-ii college careers by drop- 
ping into the groove of hotdioiise life 
around a fraternity liic-phice. Kiesh- 
hjcd certainly ha\<- no eau-e tO leave 

college because they have not hap- 
pened to make a f iiiternits ; neither 

bave fraternity freshmen any reason 
10 believe that 1 pledge button is a 
ticket of passage through the semes- 
1,1 examinations, nor further, through 

a four-year college OOUrai 

The bmtal truth is that the frater- 
nity, while a stimulus. Is not pjeces- 
*arilv an open sesame to all the good 
thingsof s college career. Any human 
organisation umkes errors in jmlg- 
im-nt. especially when the choices of 
eligible men arc made in three or four 
davs. Dartmouth does nut expect 
anv freshmen to accept placidly the 
fraieroiti decision as the final rerdkft 

on S college career. Kvery mun may 

do his share of the college worh, and 
the college does not require a jeweled 
pin as a permit." 



SENIORS 

It iMt'i too late to Start yout "Major* 

binary. Make a comparative 

Selection In the library and 

order your books from 



Johnson Book Company 

85 Pleasant Street. 



All kinds of agricultural books 

promptly delivered at lowest 

possible prices. 

MOONEY 16 and BISHOP 16 



♦ They're not short-lived 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 eiaMeen Jersey 
cows were officially tested 
which averaged P years 
and 7 months of age. Tneir 
average milk production 
was 8617 pounds. Average 
butter fat. 387 pounds. One 
of these cows was over IS 
years old. 
Inncevitv Constitution and Economic 
Production are Jersey characteristics. 

TBE AMHUCAN JEBSEV CAVTU CUTS 

S24 W. MS St.. New Y«rk City 




FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Uoston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOF.MAN 



E. E. MILLETT 

JKWELEK awn OPTOMETRIST 

Lennes ground while you wait 

College Jkwhlhy 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar String 

AM It Kit NT, MASS. 

Next to Host Office. 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 

Suits I ].-.im-d. I'ressed and Dyed. All kinds ol 

Kei aitihg !«i l.;ein«s and Gentlemen neatly done. 

Ilich L>rade woi V bv first cla-ss tailor, Work 

eallfrl for and delivpreri, Sell tickets for pressing, 

4 tuns I or ii.50 

GEORGE KOrOWITZ, PftOf*. 

MalnStTWt, ,\ij.l.erst. Mass. -&&S&* 

iin\uni »*\ to the Post Office, lei. 43^ » 



Amherst 



GO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A < hurch home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKtll T.AK stlMJA*^ HKKVIt:r.AT7 ¥ M. 



Shirt.s. 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



to- 15c 
2 1 ic 
s 1 at 

48c per doz 
30c per dn/ 



BASEBALL DIAMOND 
The work of stripping the diamond 
on the new athletic field ii progress- 
ing rapidly nnd Is nmkitig a great 
improvement in the appearance of 
tin- (Ivld. Tin 1 AthWtir association 
Minviiig the int'u-hl lavi*.l nut in the 
nioRt fipprovrd fiifhioii, mul the first 

-ti-p cd removing the turf along the 
base Hbs* is almosl oonjpleted. The 
basebail mta ate viewing the work 
with "irat satisfaction f«n* the result 
promises loUeoae at the finest eolhi- 
uiate ilianiouiiB in iIom pari of the 
country. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN * DYER, Props, 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
— Pens— 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Sun 

R.T. FnoST,Afent; D.S»SBiat*W, AsM 

Try our ticket system — - 

Put fall nana sad address on laundry 

FLOWERS AND PUNTS 

Qrown by the Florlcnltaral Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of est 
flowers and plants at reasonable rales 
to students and faculty. This stoc k 
is grown in modern houses urn 1 ' 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations 
violets, chrysanthemums and iw ! 
peas in season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

i • 1. 1. soo 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at fj Fle*smnt St. 
OcuU*U' PTeicHp tlom Filled. Itrokeii I ^•ll%^>^ 
Accurately Keplaced. Kim Wjtrh Repainnu 
I'romptli .ind ~kilf«IK Done. 

^atisfactiun Guaranteed 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 

Qood work speaks for Itself 

Nash Block, Amherst, M ■ 



FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT 

orcester will be the stamping 
1*1 mil of the M. A. t\ eleven next 
iri k, when they will line up against 
id Worcester Tech team in a game 
il, starts the second half of the 
,, -nil. The Tech team shouhl prove 
1,. be easy picking for the Maroon 
h ion u they have shown little to 
v re the big visiting team. Last 
«, ; .-k Worcester Tech was only able 
to boat the weak Rhode Island Stale 
h mi hv the score of (!-<) while Aggie 
Hi I the Holy Cross team, aided by 
tin referee, with a seven to seven 
. c. The Holy Cross team was 
unlv heaten seven to nothing by 
Springfiefal and they held the power- 
ful Army eleven to a 1 1 to 14 tie. 

The si|ii:id came tlinmgh the iloly 

Cross same in fair shape ■ Dunn's in- 

juit'd knee is still troubling him and 

PhusU'd has a had ankle but outside 

hat the players are tit for the 

Tech game Saturday. The whole 

team is disgusted with the work of 

Ihi referee in Saturday's game and 

while they are not given to offering 

l ibis, they feel that with an\ kind 

1 fair show the victory would 

< (line to the M . A. C. eleven. 

I be practice this wi-ik will prolia- 
M In- devoted more to developing 
Mr Bqsad for the Tufts game than 
In petting them ready with the con- 
test with Tech and on form displayed 
thus far the Aggie boys look for a 
sin over the Med ford rival this year. 

Aggie has plased four games thus 

far, has won one tied one and lost 

two, OjH'niug the season against 

tlic big l)artinoiith team they held 

the college to a 18*0 score and all 

Mi- points were practically scored in 

first Quarter before the team 

found itself. Against the Harvard 

tin bain lost in the last moments of 

the play on an intercepted forward 

1'ii^s that would be termed nothing 

il> than flukey. The following 

k ( 'o|by sent her team here to be. 

aled by a IS-fl score and Saturday 

li- Maroon jerseys tied those of the 

le as explained before. If the 

scholarship rulings or injuries do not 

«i[H!>l the make-up of the eleven, It 

looks like a big year from now until 

\ ember IS. 



PLANS FOR "AGGIE NIGHT" 

ARE NOW WELL UNDER WAY 

Roister Doister Secure s Large Reser- 
vations For The Follies, Oct. 30. 

Manager Nicholson of the Roister 
Doister Dramatic society announced 
Wednesday that 500 seats had been 
secured for the last performance of 

the '/iegfeld Follies at the Colorial 

Theatre in Boston, the nigbt of the' 

Tufts game, Oct. SO, and the choices J 
for seats would go on sale Saturday ■ 

iiioiniugat eight o'clock, prices S3 00, 

|1. /in and Si 00. The management | 
is willing to make it an Aggie night I 
and will decorate with Massachusetts 
banners and d<» everything to make it 
a success, provided it is guaranteed 
there will be no throwing of confetti 
or the like. Between the second and 
third acts the college song will be 
sung and only then will any cheering 
demonstration be permitted. 



CAMPION 



PROM COMMITTEE ELECTED 

Glass of 1B17 Chooses Seven Men To 

Arrange Annual Affair. 

I the meeting of Oct. 1h, the class 

* 117 elected the following men 

elected to the .Junior Prom com- 

• ; Lewis T, Ba ck man of Wilkes 

I .. l'a.. Charles H. Hallett of 
Hi afield, Kliot Henderson of Hiug- 
Kdmiind B. Hill of liiithetfonl. 
N , Frank W. Mayo of Houlton, 
Mi Harold M. Warren of Melrose 
in Arthur W. Williams of Sunder- 



<ruld C. Poole of Hudson has 
elected captain of the Kresh- 
footbal] team. His position is 
mlf back. 



Fine Tailoring 

COLLEGE OUTFITTER 



Keady-To-Wear Clothes 



FRESHMEN NO LONGER 

HAVE TO JUMP NUMERALS 

Altough Time Limit is up Some Still 
Have the Habit 
The Freshmen greeted last Wed- 
nesdn\ with joy, for it meant that 
only six hours mote would elapse 
before thej could walk along the 1 
College campus without, every now | 
ami then, making a grand leap to 
clear an elusive "nine." These 
■'nines" proved especially bother- 
some at tiiwht and manv of the wise 
Fresh carried flash-lights in order to 
be able to see those coveted < lig- 

urea) numerals. But at noon 
Wednesday, that is. aftei Assembly, 

the Freshmen once more walked with 
a firm tread and realized that one of 
their innumerable duties had been 

BoccesafuUv performed. The strangi 

pai f of it is. however, that some 
have performed so strong a habit 
that thev still persist in jumping 
them, against all protests liv thi-it 
companions. 



F. A 




MElN'S store 



Use Our New Cash Discount Card and Save Five Per Cent 



ON 



SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



— — Come to US for 



COLLEGE TO CO-OPERATE IN 

LECTURE COURSES IN 

BOSTON 

L. It. Hayes of the Boston chain- ; 
ber of commerce has been at the col- 1 
lege to discuss plans for evening { 

lecture courses to be given in Boston] 

and vicinity. K. !>. Waid, J, It. 
Foord, F. C. Sears, R. W. Iteca, i 

S. IS. Haskell and L. I'.. Hayes had a 

conference about the mattei and de- 
cided (hat there wotild probably he 
three courses of eight lectures each. 
The courses will begin the last of 
October and last until Christmas. 
The subjects will be po ult r y , farm 
management and either fruit Of tegs 
table growing. These courses will 
lie given by co-operation between the 
Massachusetts Agricultural college, 
the chamber of commerce at Boston 
and the school committee of BostOB. 
Last year nine courses of five lectures 
each weie given with an average Kg* 
isttatiou of §00 people. 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trooser Hangers 

Ever Heady Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see yon. 






THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



PIPES PIPES 

A Large and IJi.iml New Assortment ol Populai Price 

PIPES 

Jii-t Arrivi-d. Cornc in and look them ovct. 

PIPES 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexali Store n n ihe Corner. 



1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 19, 1915. 



J. QINSliUKG 

11 1-1 Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNliUNl INfi 

75c Special Half Sole, Rubber 75c 

ivi r \iKi.M. 
Black, Tan, White Work Guai tttteed 

1 • irf i« ■ 1 : >» 

K-ibber Sole* 0H..-.O 

Kutiber Soles, with Uee Is . . Sjl.TS 

Soles Sewed, ..... 7.1«- 

VA Sliliit'ft for Sl.no 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Mock, Amherst, Mass 

Office Hours: gto ta a. m., 1-30 to 5 i\ m. 



STEAM KITTING. Telephone 59— K 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 
Windows, Lead Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave.. AMHKRST. MASS. 




Established 1904 



I. M. 1ABR0VITZ 

FINE 

Merchant Tailor 

and GENTS' FURNISHINGS 



We will call and deliver clothe* 



Dyeing, Altering, Gleaning and Pressing 

Full Dress Suits to Rent and Dress Supplies 



REPUBLICAN NOMINEES 

ADDRESS STUDENT BODY 

McCall And Clashing Speak To Begi- 
uient From An Automobile. 

lion. Samuel W. MeCnll, repnbli- 
can candidate for governor of Massa- 
chusetts, and Hon. Calvin Coolitlge, 
nominee for lieutenant-governor, ad- 
dressed the students from automo- 
biles (luring the drill hour Wednesday 
afternoon. The candidates were on 
their way to Greenfield and had just 
previous! s spoken to the students at 
Amherst college. Moth spoke very 
hriellv and commended the good work 
the college is doing for agriculture in 
this commonwealth. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

ELECTS MANAGERS 

At the class meeting held after 

OSSetnbtV Wednesday, the Sopho- 

i v class elected the following 

managers for class teams ; r'ootluill. 
Frank liaiuliiidge of Patterson, N. 
J. ; haskethall, Paul F. Ilunnewell 
of Wiutlirop ; track, Thomas K. < 'ar- 
id of Andover. 



? 1 1 AMITY ST., 

AMHERST, - - - MASS. 



Telephone 302-W. 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 

the MM) econnmn hI joti Mil tt*e. 

Better CROi b 

»SJ ! I 1 ■» rzO*& are llic inevitable result. 

*tftTIUZ*^ 
THE ROGERS fc HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

{IIRh hihI Wink-, I'lll-llMH'l. »..tn.. 




Muntlngton Ave., Kxeter and Blagden Sts.. Boston, Mass. 
Headquarters for College Men when in the cttj 



AMOS M. WHIPPLE, rmop 



C&rptrvtcr & Morehous* 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Now is the time to he planning for 



Fraternity Groups 



Have them laken at — — 

MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 

44 State Street, • Northampton. Mas* 



RULES ANNOUNCED FOR USE 

OF NEW INFIRMARY 

r<> be Under Supervision oi Dr. C. E. 
Marshall. Fees Very Moderate. 

Supervision. 

The Infirmary is under the <j< >" /-</ 
.s,tj« ,.,,,.,„ n f |)r. Charles. K. .Mar- 
shall, who is designate*! m snper- 
visiH of the Inlirmaiv. Miss Flor- 
ence Levensaler, the resident anrse, 

IS in ii,iin"liiih' chaigc of the liitinn- 
i rv . 

Use ol Infirmary. 

students are urged to g<. to ihe In- 
linnaiN at any time that liny arc in 
need of the services rendered l»y the 
resilient nurse or by a town physician. 
Inasmuch as Professoi Hicks gives 
special attention to all student 'Its- 

e.ises. it la (o be expected that th« 
majority of lbs students will go to 
the Infirmary at the suggestion of 

Professor Hicks. This umierstafid- 
ing. however, should lit no way de- 
ter students from going to the In- 
firmary voluntarily at any time. 

General Health. 

Students are uiged to oOOSUlt Pro- 
fessor Hicks or .Miss Levensaler im- 
mediately when signs of physical dis- 
ordtt sppenr, Severe attacks of 
cold or <»ther forms of illness c:m 
usually l>e avoided if treatment is ad- 
ministered in the incipient state. 
The purpose of the Infirmary is to 
help maintain the general good 
health of the students a* well as to 
furnish a suitable place for profe.*- 
i sional attention In cases of severe 
Illness or accident. 

General Fee. 

The Infirmary fee will be at the 



made for miscellaneous treatment oi 
g minor character unless the patient 
receives one or more inealB or re 
mains at the Infirmary for one o 
more nights. 

Additional Expenses. 

In additon to the fee charged, a 
specified in the preeeeding paragraph 
the following additional expense 
will he charged to the patient. 

Nurses : 

In case a special nurse is required 
for the proper care of un individual 

the services and hoard of this riursr 
will he paid by the patient ; such a 
nurse will he under the general supei- 
visiou of the resident nurse. 

Professional Services: 

If a student requires medical ill 
tention hy a physician, he will he n 
quired to select his physician and I- 
come responsible for fees. 

Supplies: 

Special medical supplies prescribe! 
by a physician or nurse will be charge) I 
to the patient. No charge will Ix 
made for ordinary medical suppli< 
kept in stock at the infirmary, ami 
furnished students in minor case 
illness or accident. 

Laundry : 

Expenses for personal laundry in- 
curred by students while in the In- 
firmary will be charged to the iinli- 
vuliial student. 



PROMINENT ALUMNI 

Dr. II. K- Stork bridge '7M, the ROD 
of a former president of the collie,. . 
w.-is elected president of the Fame 
National Congress at Us annual th- 
ing which was held in Omaha. Neli 
cailv ia October. This Is an achieve 
meni of considerable note, for I Ik 
Farmers* National Congress is "real! 

national In character. Bvery section 

of the country and of the important 

agricultural states were represented 

in its recent annual session Itl 
efforts are directed to wan I the con 

sideration of national economic pi 

terns of direct Importance to 

American farmer. Parcel Post, Sav« 
Hanks, Federal Market Bureau, tin: 
Smith-I^ever Extension I«*«w. OI" - 
margarine laws and Restricted I in 
grntion are some of the more ree< si 
legislative achievements for n*h h 
this organization has been burg 

responsible.** 

Dr. Stockbridge's election mtrki 
an era 111 the history of the organ 
tiou for he is the first man who 
been trained all his life in ngricul' 
and who has been in close touch a h 
the agricultural colleges and e»| 
ment stations of the country t 
elected as president of the CoDgf -• 
In 11 recent issue of the South s* 
Rnmlifit bt said: * k I would r*»i 
be recognized ns one of the prog 



rule of *l on., day and will he charged sive practical farmers of this c 
when one or more meals are obtained try and lr« worthy of theirconfi'i 
at the Infirmary or when ihe student I than to win any other ooneoh 
remains at the Infirmary for one or I proferment, 
more nights. No charge will be Di. Stockbridge has also bec> 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 19, 1915. 



1 



I'veral years the editor of the South- 
ru Rteratfaf, published at Atlanta, 
ieorgia. 



NINETEEN THIRTEEN NOTES 

Nineteen-thirtcen : The old time 
,ep; Tufts game Oct, 30th; Aggie 
tght, lets have u record breaking 
much thers. 

Earle Hubbard of Hatlleld,ex-lU13, 

Itowdoin l'.tl I. was an interested 

peclator at football practice last 

week. "Hub" is planning to enter 

I'.owdoln medical this year. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Among the younger alumni noticed 
at the Holy Cross game Saturday 
were Baker Ml, "Nubby" Adams 

nd ••Norm" Clark MS, Sears, Taft, 
Meliean, Whitmore M. r >, Maguire ex- 

17 and Warrei ex-M8. 

*7H.— Dr, H. K. Stockbridge, edi- 
tor of the Smithi-m llurnlist, was 
recently elected to the presidency of 
' he Farmer's National Congress. Dr. 
stockbridge is the sou of the former 
president of the college, Levi Stock- 
■ ridge in whose honor Stockbridge 
hall is named, 

'#■>. — Fred C May is now a farmer 
in (irototi. 

''Mi. — H. C. Davis has <'hanged 
his residence to 32 Carnegie Way, 
Mlanta, Ga. 

•in;. — Harry T. Edwards. the 
United States Director of Agricul- 
ture in Pbillipine Islands talked to 
the Northampton Board of Trade on 
Sept 80, discussing the agriculture 
i nd life of the islands, 

*y?. — George D. Leavens was host 
it a class reunion in New York re- 
• ntly. Dinner at the Chemists club 
followed by the theater was the pro- 
run. Drew, Smith ami Peters were 
the guests. The occasion was the 
. \ position of Chemical Industries 
II at the Grand Central Place, 

'!»7. — John R. Eddy, formerly In- 
dian Agent at Lame Deer, Mont,, is 
now with the Souther Farms and Live 
Mock Company, Fairford, Ala, with 

branch office at $50 Kquitanhle 
i dlding, New York. 

'UK. — Dr. John P. Nickcrson was 

tminated without opposition from 

i ie Second Barnstable district. Dr. 
kersou served in the General 
1 'tirt last wiuter. 

II.— Arthur Stevens and "Red" 

I 'ster were recent visitors about 

« -liege. 

M4. — Mr. and Mrs. J. Henry Hurst 

nounce the marriage of their daiigh- 

Annie Swallow to Murray D. 

I tieolo on Oct. 9 at South Easton, 

N 1 N BTMtN-FllTISRN . 

\„tife— IflS will have a get-to* 

V (her and reunion at the Springfield 
g me. Let's have at least half the 
< i si there. All those who will be 
!| re and be present at a "feed," 
1> ase send In word to the secretary, 
D tails published later. 



Several 1919 men wen- at the Holy 
Cross game Saturday, among them 
George Meliean, "Andy" Dalryinple, 
"Dick" Sears, ••Oel" Perry and Phil 
Whitmore. 

"Sid" Masse who is with the Inter- 
national LaboratoriesNewof York and 
New .Jersey as bacteriologist . repoits 
that War Crys tire not among the 
best sellers in New York, also that 
musical comedies are a thing of the 
past. 

"Mert" Lane and Miss Marten 
Bridgman of Amherst were mar- 
ried Sept. 2<*i. They will live in 
Springfield, 

••Skinny"Hogers is reported lohave 
announced his engagement ami so 
has "Phil" Macy Who is the next ? 

"Dick" Sears is doing P. <!■ work 

in Landscape ;»t Harvard, rooming 
with "Sammy"/,ehrung who is taking 
the same sort of work. 

"Hank" Lincoln is also at Harv- 
ard studying business administration. 
Who though he lacked that before? 

"Andy" Dalryinple is not working 

now, but anyone wishing his services 

should send in their bids soon 

"Bill" Haskell is working with 
Butler and llman in Northampton, 
"Stan" Wright is also in North- 
ampton, working with Canning. 

I.X-M7. — Kenneth C. Bevaii is now 
entering as a Freshman at Dartmouth, 
where he is playing on the Freshman 
football team, which defeated Wor- 
cester academy at Worcester Satur- 
day by a 20*0 SCOTS* "Bev" stepped 
in at the Bancroft for a few minutes 
ami saw some of his Aggie friends 
who were down for the Holy Cross 



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The editor of one of our leading sgric ul- 
tural papers write* us under dale of January 
12th, 1915. as follow*:- 

"I am doing all I can to induce farmers to 
plant grain crops this year. 

"Grain is very high and it is going higher. 
Wheat is gong to $2.00 per bushel and other 
grams will share b the advance. Wheat costs 
$2.50 per 1 00 pounds now, and pound for 
pound oats cost as much. 

"It teem* to me thai the eastern farmer's 
salvation is to buy plant food and grow 
CORN, WHEAT, BARLEY, 
OATS AMD BUCKWHEAT 

"Last faB I doubled my acreage of winter 
wheat and das spring 1 thai triple the acreage 
of oats. I managed to produce 40 busheti 
of wheat to the acre, and sold the straw it 
$] 7.00 per ton in the bam." 

THE OI^OBTUNITY IS YOURS ! 
Bs sura AM you buy 

E. Frank Coe Fwtilizer* 

They are awaabb plan! foods that more th an meet the most 
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it 1 4 i'a bushels to the acre. 

THE WPWrrUMTTY IS Y0UK1 WILL YOU MAKE THE MOST OP TTt 



X 



The Coe-Mortimer Comfany, SI Chambers St„ N. Y, 




8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct, 19, '9*5- 



JOIN THE BUNCH 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING 

N»w lnt.iti'il ovit puit iillicr. 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal I ickt t .system TeLjt-M 

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Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

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1 ipt- n Sunday from 7-12. On your w^y to I'. I ». 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner ol llillm.in and Barnes Streets, tlnee 
blocks from tin- Union Depot, is a modern MM 
telry run on the tiuroiiean Plan. It ts just a step 
Irom Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its roomt are well furnitbed and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices •! and up; rooms 
with bath dingle) »i .."><• and up. 

Its excellent cuisine an i we!! ventilated dim tig 
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tiling of the highest quality, well cooked and 
mm zed in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and \"ii will 
anticipate staying there again. Musk tver) 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



■EL Th Massachusetts Agricultural College F0UNTAIN PENS 



Offers courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
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A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



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Thirty-six dozen pens to select ft m 

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AMHERST. MASS. 



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Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

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Special Luncheon 12-3 I'. M 

PRIVATE DININC ROOMS 

A la Carte Service 
Proa o jo 1. in' « 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic We'd Association, 

The College Senate , 

Footb&U Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association, *'• 

Teunib Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister B o lst e r s, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

Nineteen lluudrcd Seventeen Index. 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

II, A. C. Catholic club, 
Fraternity Conference, 

Stoekbridgc club. 



c. A. Peters, Secretary 

(1. II. Chapman, Secretary 
( . S. Hicks, Treasurer 
S. W. Hall, Piesident 
('. \\ . Moses, Manager 
A. W . Spnuldiiig, Manager 
1). A. Kicker, Manager 
A. Huntington, Jr., Manager 
MOOrhOttSe, Manager 
II. Aiken, President 
J. T. Nicholson, Manager 
F. A. Anderson, Mauager 
L. K- Fielding, Manager 
F. W. Mayo. Manager 
A.J. Hicks, President 
President 
C. H. Could, President 
R. F. Taber, President 



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Dinner if airatigrd lot. 

Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients. 




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Stationery, Newspapers, 
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Leave AOX1IE COLLEGE for MOL- 
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CARS 



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50 Miles of Trackage JTodern 
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Special Cars at 



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For college and military schools, and have won and 
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Jacob Reed's Sons, 

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MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL. COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 2h, 1915. 



No. 6 



4GGIE WINS CROSS COUNTRY 
RUN OVER WORCESTER TECH 



Aiken and Richards Come in Together 

Well in Advance of First Tech 

Man. Score is 25-31. 

Worcester Tech was do match fur 
the Aggie cross country runners Sat- 
ii day at Worcester and Massachu- 
etts made a clean Bireep by winning 
25-3 1. Aiken and Richards were the 
first to finish the four and one-half 
mile course, coming in together in the 
good time of 24 minutes, 59 seconds, 
starting from Tech's Alumni field 
between the first ami second periods 
of the football game, the contestants 
begun their run well bunched, with 
* 'a plain Francis of the Tech team 
netting the pace. He held the lead 
until the runners passed Newton Hill 
us the rerurn course, where Aiken 
and Richards closed up from behind 
and psssed him together. The Aggie 
men paired for the rest of the distance 
mil finished abreast. Captain Francis 
'ried hard to r^t n h un with the lead- 
ers but they were too far ahead, and 
lie finished in third place. 

Throughout the race the Aggie 
■miners used team work to tl>e best 
possible advantage. They ran 
hunched together for a greater part 
of the course and and kept the Tech 
men worried all the time. Russell 
mid Glover who finished in fifth place, 
came in together miming easily and 

• ping well ahead of the next group 
if Worcester men. The finish of the 

•ntest Saturday gives the team con- 

tence of making s good showing st 
- intercollegiates Nov. 13, but it 
-m demonstrated the need of another 
n to run with the four leaders, 
una finished in eleventh place while 

• hardson, the sixth man on the 
' ixgie team did not cross the tape at 

* I. 

- The runners and their positions 
re; Aiken and Richards of M A. 

< tied for first ; Francis of W. P. I. 
did ; Powers of W. P. I. fourth ; 
issell aud Glover of M, A. C tied 
>r fifth; Sandstrom of W. P. I. 
venth ; Braekelt of W. P. I. eighth ; 
•utler of W. P. I. ninth; Lyons of 
1. A. C eleventh. Reavey of W. 
'. I. came in tenth, bnt his score was 
ot counted ss only fire Aggie ran- 
en finished. 



BOSTON ALUMNI AT TUFTS 
GAME 

Four hundred of the Alumni 
around Boston have had special 
notice of the Tufts game and it is 
expected that the "old boys" will 
fill a good slice*of that cheering 
section at Tufts Oval, Saturday. 

This year's schedule has fa- 
vored Boston men, giving them 
two chances to look over the team. 
Those who saw the Harvard game 
predict great things for Aggie in 
the game with Tufts, 

Headquarters after the game 
will be the United States hotel. 
After supper, over 300 alumni and 
undergraduates will take in "The 
Follies" at 1 lie Colonial Theatre 

Boost Old Aggie" has been 
the watchword on the campus— 
tbej tell us "Friendliness" has 
taken its place this year. The 
alumni who get out to the game 
will feel the effeCt--and hsve S 
( n.ir>ce"**To ptsctko » »u*. 



i in. 



FORMAL DEDICATION OF NEW 
STOCKBRIDGE HALL FRIDAY 



Axel Stjerntof ex-' 17 was one of 
ie Aggie rooters at the Worcester 
cell game. He plans to re-enter 
-liege in Februsry. 



" ON TO TUFTS * IS SLOGAN 

Whole Student Body Goes to Medlord 

Saturday Looking for Victory 

Over Old Rivals. 

*On to Tufts" will be the watch* 
word of Aggie for the ensuing week 
and never since the student body 
began their yearly exodus to Med- 
ford have the prospects been so rosy 
as they are at the present lime. The 
team that represents M. A C. and 
the Brides system of coaching this 
year is a well balanced eleven, well 
dulled in the fundamental- of the 
game and with a varied assortment 
of plays that should prove ban! of 
solution by the Brown and Blue The 
team has come through thus far with 
a minimum of injuries. Ihe only man 
who is badly off heing Dunn who is 
still troubled with an injured knee. 
Saturday'* game was rather easy 
and the team was not forced to the 
limit at any time by the eleven of 
Worcester Tech. Tufts also had an 
easy game, defeating Boston College 
by a f6-0 score. The Tuf to team 
paid dearly for Ac victory if reports 
that emanate from the training camp 
are to be believed as Doane, the mar- 
velous plunging fullback of the Med- 
ford eleven will be out of the game 
for the rest of the season with a 

[i -onilnu-il f»n rags * J 



Afternoon Exercises with Alumni 
Speakers, Followed by Inspection of 
Building, Organ Recital In Evening. 

Stockbridge Hall, complete in con- 
struction, and 11 nsiii passed in equip- 
ment, will be formally dedicated at 
public exercises in the new nuditor- 
ium, to commence at two o'clock Fri- 
day afternoon. Prof. .lames A 
Foord of the Agricultural Depart- 
ment will preside, and several excel- 
lent .speakers have been secured. 

William H. Bowker, M. A. «'. '71, 
chairman of the building committee, 
will speak personally concerning Dr. 
Levi .Stockbridge, a former president 
of this institution. The usual 
formal speech of dedication will be 
given by Dean Joseph L- Hills of 
the College of Agriculture at the lu- 
iversity of Vermont. Dr. Hills is a 
progressive alumnus of M A. (*., a 
graduate in the class of 'HI, and he 
la sure to have a good measage f<» 
all in his talk on Agricultural Kdmii- 
tion in New England. Mr. Wilfrid 
Wheeler, secretary of the state board 
of agriculture, who has been beard 
here several tiroes, will discuss "The 
Department of Rural Kngineeriug," 
and remarks along general tines by 
s representative of Governor Walsh 
of Massachusetts and President But- 
iciticld will complete the exercises. 
A reception will then be held iu the 
auditorium st four o'clock, to be 
followed by inspection of the entire 
building. 

Prof. William C. Hammond of 
Holyoke. organist at Mt. Holyoke 
College, will give a recital in the au- 
ditorium at eight o'clock. His repu- 
tation as an organist needs no ex- 
planation, ruid a rare treat is assured . 

The complete program ia as fol- 
lows; 
WO f». M. -AiulHorium 

Mumi I ni lege flrehmtra 

Prayer, hdw»rd M, Ix-wi*. m-nn, 

M. A. ( . 

"Levi S tock hrtd gs and < hsiies b. 
Klini,* William M, llowker. » hair- 
man ••( Ifullflinir. < •tiiifiiiitef . 

" V jirieiih ural Education in New 
Rftglsitd," J oseph I.. Hilli«, Dean, 
College (if Agriculture, IHdvers* 
iiy of Vermont 

Munie, fuHeirf Orchestra. 

"The Department of Itural Kn 
uineering," Wilfrid Wheeler. Bee 
niarv nt State Bn*ril of \|iri«*iil- 



turt* 
Remark- 



Governor's repreeetitative 



f < »ntt?MlMl on peer «J 



MASSACHUSETTS MAKES 

CLEAN SWEEP OVER W. P. I. 

Takes Easy Game at Worcester by 

Score of 97-0, Tech Men Never 

Get a Chance to Score. 

Worcester Tech never had a 
chance in Saturday's game at Wor- 
cester, and four touchdowns and a 
Held goal by Palmer in the last min- 
ute of play made it an Aggie victory 
by the score 27-0. But for the miss- 
ing of alt four goals it would have 
been 81-0. Worcester's only shin- 
ing lights were in the backfleld, 
which was speedy but lacked the 
weight necessary to make any im- 
pression on the Aggie line. Not 
once was Aggie forced to punt and 
only once or twice did the hall go to 
Tech on downs. Captain Curran 
made the first touchdown at the end 
of the first quarter, by a 2f»-yard run 
through tackle. Weeks added an- 
other soon after the second period 
opened. Darling, in the third 
quarter, scored the next six points 
hy a sensra.ouai iiiuoi .S1.U3 yani.s 
through a broken field for a touch 
down, .shortly after. Weeks carried 
the ball over for the fourth touch- 
down of the game. The Palmer, 
with but one minute to pla\ . went iu 
at quarter and dropkicked a field 
goal from the :S7-yard line, making 
the final score 27 0. Two of the 
regulars were missing from the line- 
up. Palmer's place at quarter was 
well filled by Murphy, sod Butt™ k 
replaced Dunn at guard. Frequent 
substitutions were made sfter tin 
first quarter was over. 

mot .,.1 vim I 1 

Buttrick kicked off to Galagbt 1 
who ran it back 15 yards to IA yard 
line. After a few short gains, Ktorts 
was tackled for a 10 yard loss ant) it 
wss Aggies' ball on the Tech f 5 yard 
line, (urran gained sight but on a 
next play Aggie wss penalized for 
off side. Weeks made it up and 
then Darling made first down. A de- 
layed pass netted Murphy one yard. 
Curran failed to gain but Darling 
ripped off five yards, and Carrsn 
went through for six yards and s first 
down. Banan recovered Weska* 
fumble for W. P. I. on their four 
yard line and Starrs immediately 
punted to Darling who ran it back five 
yards. Curran then came through for 
20 yards through left guard and 
Weeks followed it up with five 
through the right bringing the ball to 
the eight yard line. Curran then 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 26, 1915. 



THE TEAM THAT MEETS TUFTS ON SATURDAY 




I > \ v re 



Weeks f b 



Danforth f t 



Perry c 



Palmrr q b 



Gravson 1 e 




Darunc; r h b 



Plaistkd I t 



( ' Si'T, (.'I'KKAS 



JOKI'AN I g 



went over but Aggie was penal lied 
live yards for off side. Curran w:».s 
only able to gain two yards through 
guard and then an incomplete! for- 
ward pass over the goal line gave the 
ball to W. P. I. on their SO yard line. 
Mossberg failed to gain on an end 
run bat Weit/.en made three yards 
through tackle. Biorn then punted 
to the 41 yard line and Darling ran it 
hack 10 yards. Weeks made a fust 
down in two rushes and then Cuinm 
cairied it 85 yards for a touchdown. 
Hut trick failed to kick the goal as. 
according to the referee, over half 
the ball went outaide the post. At 
this point W. P. I. made some sub- 
stitutions and the period ended. 

-I I <>SI> nlMllll:. 

Iluttrick kicked oft to Cassavant 
who ran it back 16 yards and then 
Mossberg fumbled. Aggie recovering. 
Cm ran made eight yard* through 
tackle and then Weeks went through 
guard for eight more and a first down. 
At this point Archibald went in the 
W. 1*. I Imektield and showed good 
football in later scrimmages. After 
a fumble bv Curran near the H» vard 

• * 

line for only ■ two yard loss. Week* 
canied the ball over in two rushes. 
No goal. 

Butt rick then kicked off to Cassa- 
vant who ran back 19 yards to the 
SIS yard line. Aided by a penalty, 
Worcester made first down twice but 
wat soon forced to punt. The kick 
was good and went to the !."• yard 
line where Darling was tackled on a 
fair catch awl Worcester penalited 
la yards. Cnrran then made nine 
yards and on the next play Darling 
ran 69 yards through a broken field 



for i touchdown. Grayson then 
punted out to good position but 
Muttrick failed on the goal. 

ltuttrick kicked off to Kalaghei 
who ran the ball back to midfield. 
The nest three plays resulted in a 
total gain of three yards so Archi- 
bald punted and Perry recovered 
Darling's fumble on the Aggie ■!«» 
vard line. Long gains by Darling, 
Weeks and Curran brought the ball 
to the li» yard line. Murphy then 
made an incompleted forward pass 
which Archibald picked up and ran 
the length of the field thinking he 
had | touchdown but the ball was 
brought back and on the next play 
Darling failed on an attempted field 
goal. The half ended with the ball 
in Worcester's possession on their 
21 yard line. 

rants '.'' m'iku. 

Day ran the kickoff 1-' yards to the 
yard line. Darling made foui 
vards but Weeks failed to gain. 
Then Curran made 10 yards for a 
first down. Darling made live but 
Aggie was penalized for offside. 
Curran made four yards and the 
Darling's four yards failed to made 
the distance which gave the ball to 
Worcester on their i'» yard line. 
Worcester, aided by a penalty, then 
carried the ball to Aggies* 25 yard 
line at which point they were thrown 
for three successive losses and on the 
fourth down an attempted drop kick 
failed. Aggies* ball on 80 yard line. 
Darling made 10 on an end run. then 
Cumin followed with two through 
guard, and Weeks made five more at 
the same play. Darling only gained 
two yards. but Weeks rip|>ed off eight 



yards and made first down. Curran 
then made another first down with 
If* yards around end. Darling made 
five yards in two rushes and Weeks 
made four and one-half yards and 
the quarter ended. 

m.i i; I ii QUARTER. 

Weeks made first down. Curran 
then went through right tackle for 
nine yards and Aggie was penalized 
for offside. Darling made sis yards 
around end and Curran made live 
more through tackle but the ball went 
to Worcester on their one foot line. 
Darling tan back Archibald's punt 
to the 33 yard line. Curran and 
Weeks gained four and five re- 
spectively through right tackle and 
then Curran made first down. Weeks 
made Mix yards through tackle and 
Darling made first down on an end 
tun. Weeks made six, Curran ad- 
ded three, and then Weeks went over 
the line for the last touchdown, 
Grayson failed oa the goal. 

Huttrick kicked to Archibald who 
ran it back 10 yards. Four rushes 
barely netted them a first down, 
Archibald then lost three, Galagher 
lost two and Curran nailed Mossberg 
for a ten yard loss. 

Archibald then punted but the 
ball brought back and a IS yard pen- 
alty inflicted on; Aggie which gave 
Tech first down. Perry intercepted a 
forward pass on the Tech So yard 
line. An attempted forward failed 
and Darling and Cnrran made five 
yards each for a first down. Af- 
ter another unsuccessful forward pass 
Palmer \>,ns sent in and made n field 
goal from the 3? yard line. 

Day kicked off to Galagher who 



Dunn r g 

fumbled and Day recovered ou tin- 
Tech 40 yard line. Darling made 
eight yards and Weeks a first down 
and the game ended with Palm'' 
signalling for another drop kick. 

\| \ (• \V<»m -kstkjc Tm II 

i.ravMin, Un-lutnU(Hi, re, Huffy. Mi«-' 

M. Ki«-. It- wmn\ 

rialsied. Ii It, Tassovai.t 

Jordan, lliuk. lu r*, beinay. Bowman, 

K.-s... Bible) 

ivny, «• ' . B0»fei 

Hnttritk. Verliet k. QJ Iff, Btorr* 

Dsnforth.SpaJdiaff, rl it. Banae, Moon 

way 

l»a>. N If. Munsi;,>ilili'Y, Kenrlt. Tut: \ 

Murphy, Grajr a o n, faliufr. ql» 

i|l>, Weit/.en, Dunl.n 

Cm-ran. Boles, Bozstram, Ihb 

rlii., lioyal. AfeblU 

Dailinir. rbl» Ikb, Muesli 

Weeks, IS fb, Oelagbei 

geese, \u«'' - s7, Worcester Tech U 
T<.Ufhi|uwiis, t'urran. Weeks *2, Darling 
(inal from Held, Palmer. Before*, ' ' 
j.fiitcr of Harvard. I'm pin*. Job I 
of Springfield, Ifeail linenmaii. l.;o>. 
of Holy fro**, Time, VI and U» wlttUh 
prriodn, 

COUNTRY LIFE CLUB 

MEETS WEDNESDAY NIGHT 

The first of the regularly ached u 

meetings of the Country Life Club 
! will be belli in Room C, .South < 
, lege, nt 6-30 on Wednesday, Nov 

President Butterfleld will be 

speaker of the evening. Delegaf- 
j at the con¥ention last Halurii 

pointed oat the particular advanUi 
; we have at this college in being 
: to obtain good speakers on rural » '» 

jeets. Such advantages are not 
i joyed at other colleges, and it 

hoped that the students here s U 
, make the best of their opportunH - 
j and turn out in support of tl ■ 

meetings. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 26, 191 5. 



WEDNESDAYS ASSEMBLY 

Owing to the fact that Stock bridge 
(tall is not yet equipped for the use 
if stereopticon slides, the lecture by 

iancis B. Havre, scheduled for last 

iS'edncsday's Assembly, wae post- 

ioned. Professor Hamilton, of the 

•1 •partiuent of Economics, Amherst 

ollege, was secured instead, and lie 

spoke on "War Finances." 

Professor Hamilton said in part : 
Many are asking how long the pres- 
•nt war will hold out. They say that 
• fimauy will become bankrupt in the 
•in se of time and will then sue for 
peace. War financing, however, is 
not a question of readv money. It is 
.11 coinplished in three principal ways. 
The first of these is commuuistic or- 
ganization. This is a system of mak- 
ing each person useful, making each 
person produce something he doesn't 
coustime. Germany's Industrial sys- 
tem is so constructed that all labor 
Itaa an alternate use. She diverts 
her land, labor and capital to the 
production of goods which she needs 
luring war time. Her system is an 
1 '\celleut example of organization. 
I'lie second method of war fiuuucing 
is taxation This method is gener- 
ally iu vogue for financing the pres- 
et war. By taxation money is taken 
from the citizens)' to pay soidters. 
In other words, thia plan gives the 
-uldiers a right to go t0 the market 
:<nd claim good.-, that the public had 
:* right to claim. It makes money 
the means through which a civilian's 
right to get goods is taken away and 
ulven to a soldier. 

•The third method is by issuing 

<tinU. This is merely exchanging 

paper for monev. or borrowing from 

the public. It can easily be seen, 

•M\cr, that organization, not 
money, is the important thing iu war- 
ms as under any of these three 
method* little money is kept out of 
1 i nutation. Organization for war 
1 us the solution of one of two big 
1 roblems, either the diverting of land, 
labor and capital when iro|H>rts and 
xjKjrts are prohibited; or the main- 
'••nunce of ini|K)rling and exporting 
« lieu land, labor and capital cannot 
he diverted. 

■•Germany has solved the first of 

fheie two problem*. When she could 

import the necessary articles for 

she diverted her lal>or that was 

nufacturing exports so that she 
i odueed the articles needed herself. 

fai method required little capital, 
» • she was not greatly affected by 
loss of foreign trade. 

■ Kuglacd ha* kept up her foreign 
reourse, and in this way obtained 

tides necessary for war. The dis- 

vantage of this method is that; 

pilal is required for war finance' 

<• capital can only be raised by 

ation, and to avoid panic the 

ifdion must be slow, hence Eng 
1 d had to go slow in preparing. 

•In war finance, then, money is 
ii t the real problem, but orgsaiea* 
1 fi. The United States bns a lesson I 
.am from the European countries. 



This is that a mere organization of 
army and navy is not sufficient to 
enable the United States to engage in 
war, but that in time of war iudus- 
dust rial organization is the keynote 
to success. 



FRESHMEN VS. DEER- 
FIELD ACADEMY 

Last Saturday the Freshman war- 
riors proved themselves victors for 
the third successive time by defeat- 
ing the Deerfield academy eleven by 
a score of 82 to 0, Coach Gore 
started a number of new men in the 
game and they gave a good account 
of themselves. The work of Wil- 
liams and Ross was especially notice- 
able and Whittle played his custom- 
ary brilliant game. For the visitors 
Hubbard ami Sloeombe excelled. 
The Freshmen received the kickoft 
and carried the ball down the field for 
a touchdown within three minutes of 
play*. The ground gaining was by- 
Williams with a II) and 20 yard i tin 
and Poole with a rush of 19 yards. 
Whittle went over for the score and 
also kicked the goal. In the second 
quarter, after substantial gains by 
Williams. Poole plunged the line for 
another touchdown. Thethird SCOTS 
was made by Pond when he plowed 
through in the second quarter with 
only 20 seconds to play. The next 
SCOre was made by Whittle on an end 
run of \H yards. The last touch- 
down was made in the fourth quarter 
on an end around play bv Coolei 
Whittle kicked the goal. Moth 
teams made one successful forward 
psss, the Freshmen attempted four, 
and the visitors two. One drop 
kick was tried by Whittle but it went 
low and was blocked. 

The siiinmarv : 



II. A. « . 

Matiscli, Unisblii, le. 
Itlaui'liaid. Ii 
.Inliiistiinc. |g 
Bond. gnaUweod, o 
K, !'. W(n.<i. Bex ton, rg 
Rom, ii 

< indey, it- 



Whittli 



i. 



Poo!*, I lib 

Williams, <••> , 

Kay, Pood, H. 



rhb 



[»KI III ii i n 
Hlorombe 

le, Tumi V 

IV;u>n!i 

r. l-'.nri In hi* 

lit. l.r.iham 

ii . tHehhtiM 

le, HriuicK 

qb, Bridges 

rlili, MaiKin 

I hi.. ' a Unban 

II.. Hubbard 



Scart— Jf. \. V. Kre«htneii It2, lJ«M»r- 
liebl Academy 0. Touchdown— -Whittle 

2. Poole, * ooies , I'ond. Referee — it u i>- 

loiil rinpire l.iiile. Timer and Lines, 
tnan— Warren, lime 7 and in minute 
quarter-. 



ALUMNI PIN SELECTED 
The executive committee of the 
associate alumni recently selected i 
pin from sample designs made by 
the College Shops of Altleboro. The 
original sketch was by Lyon '13. 

The pin !s of silver three-eightbs of 
an inch In diameter with scalloped 
edges. The words **MtiS. Agrieul- 
t in a I College" In silver on a maroon 
enamel band surround the state seal 
in oxtdixed relief. 

1'ive hundred of tliene have been 
Ordered made up an lapel buttons, 
consecutively numbered, anil will be 
distributed, without cost, to the 
alumni during tbe year. 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN St DYER, Prop*. 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
-Pens— 



ONE 



YEARS SUPPLY 
OF MAGAZINES 



IOC 



An Especially (iood Commtailon PropMitlon— 

Casli (or tfnt ordfts— Article widely Adverti«ed— 

Cuts down expense in power plant*— Addtfs* 
KnoInkkkini; Surii v r'o., 11.18 N otli Street, 
Philadelphia, P.i. 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of W'rounht Iron and Brut Plp«, Valve* 
and PittinKN f<M Ste&n, Wati»i and (Us. Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings. Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies Engineers and 
Contractors tot Meani and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
Connections. - Holyoke, Mass. 

IMvCKMAWS 

Candies and Ice Cream 

** IIAMI" *» 



nn Yflll KNI1W ,|L ' ! 'oiimIkmI^ r*f publishers 
UU IUU nnun „, M »I.l !..- ula.l losend y»n a 
fiii' sample inps of their Mafc-a/iiic il the) Otll) 

Km « \.. in ftddreaa? It it our business to im 
ulali piil>ll<hers only with the names ut intilli 
Kent maua/iiie reaileis. If yon will write your 
full address VERY plain and send M ONLY 10 
rents (in stiver) or bhmmj ordei we »iii send 
mhi i name lo ses era I hundred im hi 1» hri> wffhiti 
a year, who witl send roil FREE sample eopies 
nf hundred* (yes, several hiindtedsi ol I lie lead 
iuii Standard Ma«a/lni^. I aim I'aoels. Poultry 
.iiHitnais. Story Magazines, Reviews and v\ eekly 
I'aiier-. Mail iphI.i and I'tade I'uldh ations. 
Ilmisekeepinu Maua/Hn-o, lawhluti .lout na Is, 
llliist rated Maifa/ines and In fuel almni all 
kinds uf Inuli-viade Inleresliuu inauu/.inc* rum 
Intr to you In most every mail for oxer a year. 
and all |.n ONLY 10 rents in *Uver . 

WE-DO-AS-WE-SAY 

sn send a .ilti-r dim*, at once and your name 
will iro «n our next ennnt b'a clrrulat Inu list and 
mmi «ni he greatly surt>rlaed at tin- result*, m 

we assure >ntl that you will he more than wall 
pleased with tin- small Investment And you 
WILL NEVER regret it, address the Maua/ine 
I iivulatinu to., Hox .V2III, Kostiin l'.«*. \. I ir 
. utattna i»e|,t i»:m. DON'T rail to «rite YOUR 

lull address EXTRA idalti. He have siMuettillUi 
in »t#,ii. f,u \ • m —ns a real surprise— If ytm will 

please let us know in what paper >ou «aw this 
ad v ei! iseiiient 



" BIDE-A- WEE 



»» 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

tint S|iei * ;i If v — And other good 'things to eat. 

MRS. L. M. STHBBIN5, 

Middle Street, I ladley, Mass. 

Tel. 415 w 

DR. R C. BANGS 

Dentist 

NAtH'S BLOCK 

Kveiiing* l»y Appointment 

hotel Ularren 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T. .1 AHERN, MANA«.ra 



[J J ^ are supplied every year 

DlirPee S OCCdS <lreat< n^reAmeri 

» can punters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. . ryeni knt>w .oirpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914,— a bright new book of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 



Paue'ii 



t*oe 



tore 



SPECIAL NOTICE 



Bij4 surprise tor M. A. C. men ;it our store! 

Don't buy Footwear till you see us 

I€l$i*y\IKIiVC4 — Double-wear Leather uied. 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOO ALLY: 5» Center St.. Northampton, Mass., 

nnd South Hadley, Mast. 



Main Office : 

1546-1548 Hroadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the belt skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



•riBALRRS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



* 









The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 26, 191 5 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



PubUthsd every Tuestlay evening 
l.\ the BtttdentH of Hie Massarliu- 
netlH Agricultural College. 



UOAIU> OF 

TYLKU rt. ROOKIW '1*'., 
KM HARD W. BMFffl 17 
Hull J. HC1IKI KKI.K 
THUS. I- HAUIUM KS'lti 
Al.rUKD A. oioiosA 'ir, 

DwiciHT r. muhbk. 

MILKOKI) K. LAW II KM 
hU.lor H+:NI»KHHON "l 
WILLIAM rtAVIM.K. .1 If 

II \i;i il I' K. JUNKS 'I*. 
MAKS1IAI.I.O. UM'III 



EDITORS. 

rSditor-tn-< l»lef 

MniuKfinu Kditor 

AwilBtaiit Kditor 

AthlrtU- Kdltur 

Athli-tk- Kditnr 

■\ 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 ■ i Kililur 

Nt-WH Killtiir 

Departim-nt Kditor 

IT. < annuls Kditor 

\»,i.i-i:iti- Kditor 

'.All 'Ik, AMD'* Kditor 



II 



KT 



BUSINESS DKI'AHTMKNT. 

(HAS. A. Ill NTIMiToN ..Ml. H-. 

ItMllUM Maiiiiirrr 

MKKUI1.I. I'. WAKNKIOT. 

AHKixtant BMiMtt Ma HIM *r 

I.KSTKK K. KIKI.IHN". Ml.. 

\ilwrt inline Marmiwr 
.IAMKS* . HlSW.1.1 I*. * iniiUtlon 



.sul,scri|»li'»ii $IM pet >e:tr. simile 
cipies, B rciils. Mitki- all OtrdMI paya- 
lik- tu OHAK.M \ Hi Mi\«.ios, .In. 



Knt«T«ida»Hfr i-« Iuxh matter at the \o.li.i>i 

1'nHt Office. 

Vol. XXVI. Tuesday, Oct. 26. No. 6 



An event that Massachusetts men 
Lave I >een looking forward to for 
years will ciiliniiiaU- in "Aggie 
Night" at the Colonial theater after 
the Tufts game It is the first time 
in the memory of the present uinlei- 
graduatee that the college has Ucti 
ahle to secure such a privilege. 
Whether or not the event tan b« «e- 
peated in future )*«rt will ilepeud 
largely on the actions of the men 
next Saturday night. Credit should 
lie given to those who, l»y their in- 
dividual efforts, ha\e made thi* 
Aggie night possible 



The lack of cheering at the Fresh- 
man foot hal I games has been quite 
noticeable. The Freshman team 
this year is playing a consistent, 
clean game antl deserves the backing 
of the student spectators. Not only 
is the cheering merited, but practice 
at these contests would possibly save 
much eleventh hour hoarseness before 
the Tufts game. There are to be 
several varsity and second team 
scrimmages this week, however, and 
it is hoped that the student IkhIv will 
turn out to these practises and en- 
courage the work of preparation for 
our rivals in Medford bv some hearty 

cheering. 

n. w. o. 



on these days will be held one hour 
earlier. 

After several weeks of "watchful 
waiting" on the part of the Sopho- 
mores, the pond was opportunely 
filled for the first part of the season, 
Friday noon. Though there were 
only four men passed by the Senate, 
they were enough to furnish amuse- 
ment to the three upper classes after 
their noon meal. The culprits were 
all thrown in for general freshness. 
They were duly punished for their 
crimes by nice cool plunges in the 
clear sparkling waters of the pond. 

Members of the senior class have 
noted with satisfaction the change 
in the position of their numerals in 
the walk leading to the campus. 
Before college opened the numerals 
were placed in a short piece of con- 
crete walk at the very entrance to 
the campus. They were, however, 
placed too near the road and after 
considerable agitation on the part of 
the members of the class they have 
been moved back to a more dignified 
posi lion . 

Aiken, the cheer leader, anuounced 
in Chapel last Friday that the Tufts 
Special would leave the Boston iV 
Maine station at 7-50 Saturday morn- 
ing. The fare will be $.'1.15, a reduc- 
tion of flftjf cents over last yeni, the 
fifteen ceuts going to pay the ex- 
penses of the band. The faculty de- 
sired that the train return to Am- 
herst by seven oclock Sunday evening 
.i. MMMDt of Monday's classes, but 
cflorts are being made so that the 
train will leave Boston a little later. 
Dean's Saturday, that day of 
reckoning looked forward to with 
great expectancy bv the two lower 
classes, has finally come. With it 
great slaughter. Only fifty-two of 
the l'.M'J prodigals were stiong 
enough to weather the storm of 
exams and quizzes. As for the 
Sophomores, they fared somewhat 
better, due, of course, to the kind- 
ness of some of the faculty. None 
of the validly football squad were 
made ineligible. The Freshman team 
fared bndly, however, no lets than 
six of the best players being down In 
studies. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notices for this column should be drooped in 
in the (..ill 1. 1 vn office or handed to William 
Ha\ i'le, .Ir. '17 on or before theSatuniay jirei .-ed- 
inif each issue. I 

Wkhnkhhay. Oct. 27. 
1-1U P, K.— Meet inn «>f cllMM sched- 
uled for 2-10. 
2-10 r. M. — Assembly, Dr. Hav'nl Matt 
Jordan. Lelatnl Stanford I'ui- 
versily. 

Tin Rsnai . o< t. 2W. 
7-80 i\ It, —Christian Association in 
Chapel. 
Kiiiii.vv, Oct. 20. 

2-00 i\ m,— Formal dedication of SlocW- 

briduc ilall. 
8-00 P. It.— Organ recital, Professor 

Hammond of Hi. Bolyoke 

college, 

s \ n icoav, Oct. 10. 

7-IUl v. M.— •Special train leaves 1J * M. 
Station for Tufts. 

Ml i'. \i.-M. A. ('. Vs. Tufts at Med- 
ford. 

H-50 i'. m.— Freshman vs. Monsoit Acad- 
emy III MoUKOll, 

8-OU i\ m.— " Airtlie Night " at lolonial 

Theater, Boston. 
St ni>a\ , <>< r. 31. 
Special ! rain leaves tUt Am- 
herst— time to be announced. 

Ti ksiiav, Nov. a. 
ts-au r. m.— Stoekbrldge Clmb. i» M 

Flint bale 
\\ i i,\i -i. \ v. Nov . a, 
1-Hl p, \i.- Assembly, Qeofgi A. Drew. 
M. A. C. '07. Manager of Cotr 
vers Farm, Greenwich, Cona, 



Drop in and look over a set of 

LIPPINCOTT'S FARM MANUALS 

By far the best "series" for the 
busy man. 

A NEATLY CARVED WALNUT CASE WITH 
EVERY COMPLETE SET 



We also have a line of Scientific 
Books which might interest you. 



JOHNSON BOOK CO 

85 Pleasant Street. 

UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Fait!). 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

Id <-t i V i; SUNDAY SERVICE AT 7 I' M 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Merrill Warner '17, who was in- 
jured in an accident llii* afternoon 
has returned to college. 

The gate recci ot* at the < olby 
game amounted to * 1 00. It is in- 
teresting to note that this sum is 
about as large as any year's total of 
jmid admissions to campus games in 
the past. 

The assMnbtiea of < >< t 11 and 
Nov. 10 will be held at 2 o'clock in- 
stead of one, according to the an- 
nouncement of Dean I^-wia in chapel 
last week. Tha two o'clock classes 



MOTION PICTURES AT M. A. C. 
Tentative Arrangements Being Made 
to 8ecure Feature Films. 
Keal motion pictures in Stock- 
bi idge Hall are a possibility thin win- 
ter. It is proposed to run a series of 
shows every Friday night in the As- 
sembly Hall, featuring all of the 
highest class releases that can be ob- 
tained. The first entertainment will 
be given November G. if all goes 
well, and there is a possibility that 
pictures of the Tufts game will be 
shown. The releases that are to be 
obtained are to lie mainly high-class 
photo dramas, giving the men a 
chance to see films that generally 
bring a quarter or half dollar at the 
popular price of ten cants. The 
management of these shows will 
probably be in charge of the Social 
Union Committee. Definite plana 
will be announced next weak. 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDEK 

Suits Cleaned, Pressed and Dved. All kin. Is u 

Kepairihe for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly done 

High-grade work by first-class tailor. Work 

called for and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing 

4 suits for $1.50 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ. Prop 

Main Street, Amherst, Mass. Nash Block 

On your way to the Post Office. Tel. 438- W 



m LAVAL 

SEPABATORS 

are the 

Most Economical 

V^OU get by far the greatest 
actual value for your money 
when you buy a De Laval — BE- 
TA US K a De Laval will give you 
much better and longer SERVICE 
than any other cream separator. 

From the standpoint of its 
greater durability alone the De 
Laval is the most economical 
cream separator to buy, and when 
you also take into consideration 
its cleaner skimming, easier run- 
nings greater capacity and less 
coat for repairs, the price of the 
H cheapen ** machine 00 the mar- 
ket is most exorbitant compared 
with that of the De Lav.il. 

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 



E. E. M1LLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar String- 

uniHiM MASH. 
Nest to Post Office. 



Amherst 



tflS BroiMlwny 



',".» K. M»ltl»»>!! !*t 
i mi 4im 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry, 



10-151 

2 I-2C 

a 1 :c 
48c per doz. 
- 30c per Hii. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1 .50 a 



RT. FROST,At*nt; L). Smerikvan, Asst. A»»»i 
«— Try wr ticket system — ■• 

Put full nasne aad ad.Ftaa mi laundr> 



■1. ititn ihii-j 

STKFHJSJf Lank Foi.hbb 

MASI-rAITIMINII JBVBI.im 

HH>1IKO.\UWAY. 3CRW YORK 

CTL.UB AND COLLBOR 
Pllti AND MINUS * 

S OLS, xi 1 v -r « Aim HMOx/.ic mni»« i.m 

S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER A OPTICIAN 

Now at ij Pleasant St . 
Otahfts* PrMcriptious Flited. Broken I^ns«i 
Aeeoratelf Kepiawd. Fina Watch R*pamBg 
Promptly and skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction (guaranteed 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Orown by the Floricultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of 1 
Sowers and plants at reasonable rat 1 
to students and faculty. This st< • k 
is grown in modern houses ui 
ideal conditions, Roses, earn at i< 
violets, chrysanthemums and Wt 
peas in season. 

iikiiun ON THE CAMPUS 

Tr l«.|>h«II»> «00 



WEBS1 



Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 

Oood work speaks for Itself 

Hath Block. Amherst, M « 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 26, 1915 




M. C. A. PLANS NEW BIBLE 
STUDY PROGRAM 

This year the Bible study work of 

! V. M. C. A. has the most com- 

I i-henaive program ever offered at 

A. C. The work will be con- 

i ii-d along three branches, namely, 

tare courses, church classes and 

inuiis classes. 

I'lu' lecture course will take the 

111 of interesting and instructive 
: Iks on the history, authenticity and 
nature of the Bible regardless of 

nomination or creed. The mate- 

J is to be presented by Professor 
innung of AmherBt College, Pro- 
' ^sor Wood and Professor Grant of 
Smith college, to whom the students 
ol M. A, U. are greatly Indebted for 
v .I'll voluntary service. These lec- 
tures will begin to alternate biweekly 
with the Dr. Seerley course, and the 
^uiie general rea|)ouae is expected 
:ueording to the rumors of the de- 
mand for such a cour.se. 

The M A. C. church Bible classes 
meet at the various churches of North 
Xiiiherst ax well as Amherst, for the 
study of a uniform text, namely, 

I lie Manhood of the Master.** 
Other such interesting books will be 
taken up throughout the year. At 
present, there arc 115 men registered 
in these classes. 

The cauipiin classes for Bible study 
will be arranged as iu former years, 
by communicating with the chairman 
of Bible study work, at hours posted 
• hi the bulletin in front of the V. M. 
< A. office. 

Aside from the regular duties of 
tl e Y. fct. 0. A. cabinet there will 
be taken up by its members the study 
of "The Meaning of Prayer" by H. 
I Kosdick. With such opportunities 
thrown in our path, every Aggie roan 
ihoatd make a real ••honest-to-God*' 
mpt to increase his knowledge of 
tl<> Bible. 



ST0CKBRIDGE CLUB 

< icorge S. Ladd, chairman of the 
cutive committee of theMaaaachu- 

* Iti state grange, spoke before the 

R Abridge club in room M, Flint 

I i. oratory, Tneaday eretung, on 

"The Opportunities of Agriculture 

ii New England." Mr. Ladd has 
ti veied much and his talk took the 
< I h, in imagination, to the west and 
Hi southland and back to New Eng- 
I' I. He gave a very beautiful 
« '-ription of a growing cotton crop, 
of griculture in the south, of the fine 

• 1 >d River apples, and the great fat 
Hear of the west. In contrast, he 
'" I of the acres and acres of New 

I ilaiid land, too valuable to leave 
W «>f doors, now under glass and 
K ring roses at $15 per stalk in one 
!'' ance. He told how Mr. Hale 

II ■ succeeded in growing apples 
*l h competed successfully with the 
•" apples of Hood River. Beef in 
ft west are now being raised more 
'" *r New England conditions ai 
ft ranches are being split np into 

II farms. In closing Mr. Ladd 
1:1 . "I believe we will have to come 
'»a < to the old idea of farming, 
*"' i cattle on the farm." 



COUNTRY LIFE MEETING 

Definite steps toward the consoli- 
dation of the Country Life Clubs of 
Massachusetts were taken Saturday 
when the Convention of Country Life 
Clubs was held at the college. Del- 
egates were present from Harvard, 
Williams, Springfield Y. M. C. A. 
college and M. A.C. and also a repre- 
sentative of the Wellesley Alumni. 
The program consisted of a morning 
session and an afternoon business 
meeting. Much enthusiasm was 
aroused during the course of the day, 
with the result that a rapid affiliation 
of the clubs is expected. 

The morning meeting was given 
over to a discussion of the advisi- 
bility of federation. R. W. Reid, 
the first president of the local club, 
outlim-d the purpose of the Collegi- 
ate Country Life Clubs, to study all 
conditions of rural life, to interest 
men in country life, to promote agri- 
culture as an industry, business, and 
livelihood. He favored the a Hi Na- 
tion of the clubs, believing that it 
would make for common interest, 
definite basis of work, and helpful 
exchange of speukers. The rural 
life problem is a big one, one that 
needs the trained man, the college 
man, for its solution. He believes 
that a federation would best do this. 
Mr. Rutter of Harvard then spoke of 
the conditions in his college. There 
are many men in Harvard who are 
interested in the work. Their chief 
trouble ties in the difficulty of ob- 
taining good speakers. Mr. Butter 
thought that affiliation would solve 
this problem. Mr. Hannin of 
Springfield then told of the good 
work of the club at the training 
school. He, too, was in favor of or- 
ganization. Williams college was 
represented l»v Mr. Williams. There 
is no country life club at Williams- 
town, though a branch of the Good 
Government Club is interested in 
rural problems. Gould ' 1 6, reviewed 
the work of the local club si nee its 
foundation two years ago. 

After the reports of the delegates. 
Prof. E. L. Morgan took up the plans 
for the organisation of the clubs 
The constitution, drawn up for the 
occasion, was read by him. "The 
name of the federation shall be the 
Massachusetts Collegiate Country 
Life Club, The purpose is to bring 
about the study of rural life in the 
colleges of the state. There shall 
be an executive committee, consist- 
ing of one delegate from each dub, 
to promote plans for the chapters." 
Plans for the following year are as 
follows ; Reading— the discussion of 
some good book, snob as Powell's 
"Agricultural Co-operation," Her- 
rick's "Rural Credit," or Fiske's 
"Challenge of the Country f lec- 
tures — outside speakers will be ob- 
tained whenever possible; commun- 
ity work— the clubs shall do helpful 
community work. The meeting 
closed with a discussion of the con- 
stitution. 
Definite steps toward organization 



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COLLEGE OUTFITTER 



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Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 




THE MUTUAL PLUMBING k HEATING CO. 



PIPES PIPES 

A Large atul Brand New Assortment «»i Popular Price 



Just Arrived. Come in and look them over. 

PIPES 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

Tfca kexall Store— On the Corner. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 26, 191 5. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 26, i9'5 



J. GINSBURG 

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THE ROGERS « HUBBARD COMPANY. Middletown, Conn. 

IHli..- Hiial Molt**. I'orllitlHl, (nrm. 



Huntington Ave.. Exeter and Klajcden Sts.. Iloston, Mass. 

Headquarter! for College Men when In the city. 

AMOS M. WHIPPLE, PROP 



C&rptrvtcr & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Main. 



Now is the time to be planning lor 



Fraternity Groups 

Have them »,iken at 

MISS McCLELLAITS STUDIO 

44 State Street, ■ Northampton. Mas. 



were taken at the business meeting. 
U. W. Reid of M. A. 0. was elected 
temporary president; Mr. Rntter of 
Harvard secretary and treasurer. 
These officers shall become perman- 
ent as soon as the constitution is rat- 
ified by the duos. Efforts this yeai 
will be confined to obtaining new 
chapters in the state. Next year, 
however, the committee hopes to in- 
terest the colleges through New- 
England. 

FLORICULTURE MEN 

MAKE ANNUAL TRIP 

Inspect the Pierson Greenhouses in 
Cromwell, Conn. 
The anumil trip of the tloriculttiral 
students to Hartford a id Cromwell, 
Conn., was made Saturday. Oct. '■!■'>. 
Leaving Amherst on the <!-"20 ear, 
the 1 1 men. accompanied by Profess©! 
Nehrling and Mr Thurston, reached 
Hartford about Mo They spent 
■OI1W time in visiting the various 
iloiists' shops in Hartford, criticising 

them whenever possible. The stores 
of Spear iV Mc.Maiins. Wei. h. and 
CoOfflba were found to lie in a *alis- 
factoi v condition and the party left 
for Cromwell where is situated the 
Borist establishment of A. N. 1'ieison. 
famous throughout the eoiinti v as 
one of the largest and best. \i T. 

Beers '12, one of the foremen there 

met the party and spent the rest ..1 
the dav in eoiidiieting them through 
all the 1% acres of greenhouses, each 
house being the subject of a brief 
lecture While notes wire taken as 
well as possible, standing room only 

Iteing available. Mr. Been end the 

professor explained everything fully, 
not only in the greenhouses, but in 
the perennial gardens a* well. Those 
making the trip were (ioogins and 
Lyfoid 'If. and (tames. DulliU.Di/.er, 
Lawrence, Lydiard. Schwab and 

Wither '17. 

FRESHMAN ELECTIONS 
At a meeting Wednesday, the 
Freshman elans elected the following 
men to seive on the committee to 
.mange the entertainment for 'he 
upper classes on the evening of Nov. 
40th: Paul Faxon. Harold \\ 
QotY, Harry Carley, Ueorge Haul- 
ing and Jonathan II. Smith. At 
the same meeting Robert L. Chris- 
holm of Melrose was elected mana- 
ger of class basket ball. 

UNDERCLASSMEN TRY OUT 

FOR ANNUAL CLASS DEBATE 

Trials for the Nophomor. -Fresh- 
man debating team were held last 
Wednesday. The Sophomores are 
Fred 11. Sampson of Fall Uiv.i, 
William R. l/oring of Hoiiaatouic, 
and Gardner ('• Ifowroee of Brim- 

field. The Freshman team is com- 
posed of Heuiy J. Hurt of West 
Somerville, Robert B Collins of Rock- 
land, and .lames Window of Lynn, 



ON TO TUFTS 

[i i.i.tinui-il In. 11. pais"' I] 

biokeu ankle. 

Tufts is represented this year b\ 
fast and rather heavy eleven n 
have relied on a wing and backlit I 
shift for their greatest gains, f hi 
are exponents of the open game and 
in Saturday's contest attempted 110 
less than 18 forward passes, of which 
five were successful. The troul 
with the team thus far has been the 
tendency of the backs to start bel< 
the ball was snapped, a fault win- 
resulted in many penalties. 

If comparitive scores could be iim 1 
to determine the relative abilities 
the two teams then they would \m 
rated as very nearly equal. Dart- 
mouth defeated Tufts by a 20-7 score 
and defeated M. A. C by one of I 
so that the teams are about pai us 
that basis. Tufts has not met tin- 
calibre of opponents that Aggie and 
for that reason their slate shows 
more victories. In the Aggie 
they will run across one which dm 
vet to meet a superior not even M 
cepting Harvard and Dartmouth and 
a liacklield that will measure up in 
the best that Tufts can prod m • 
Tufts has 110 punter who can COtti 
pare with Palmer and although Pmi I . 
■cored 1 dropkiek against Boston 
college, he is not the serial seorei 

that Palmer has proved to be 

A special train will be run as usual 
and a large crowd of alumni living 
in and about Iloston will lake ill 

game so that Um' Aggie cheering * 

turn should Ire well tilled. The |> 
nit wick will be spent in drilling ihc 
acmbs on Tufts plays that the scout- 
have seen to get the varsity ready fw 
anything that Doc Whalen's li 
may spring in the line of trick phm 
and fancy shifts 

STOCKBRIDGE HALL DEDICA 
T10N 



1 ..iiiliiiii-.l fri.ii. ism.- I , 

Remarks, President ButtcreeM 

t (HI I-. M. I!ei e|.IH.Il 

t i". :. 16 c. N. Insi'ci in. n i.l 1 he \> 
n| 

SIHI C. M. Oiuall reeillll lt> ITttf 
li.iiii C. Hammond of Holyoki 



*l.*». — Kldon S. Moberg is getting 
actual experience in preparation foi 
teaching, at Stannox I'aiui, Sherborne, 



STOCK JUDGERS IN LAST 

PLACE AT STRATHGLAS 

The result of the stock }» 
contest held at Strathglas Fai 
Port Chester, N. V. was not partic- 
ularly gratifying to the Aggie H 
for of the six eastern colleges 
in the contest. Massachusetts 
last. Pennsylvania State < 
had the highest team score, 
Connecticut Agricultural colleg " 
second place. The other co 
placed as follows: Cornell, 1* ir 
Island State, New Hampshire 
and Massachusetts Agricultural. 

C. K. Dunham, Jr. of Cornel! 
the nigheet individual score, M 
Cahill of Coiiuecticiit Agricii 
college was second and Paul M 
of Pennsylvania State third. 
M. A. C. men who made tri| 



Hill 
if 



1 >uis Rowe of Melrose, A. .lames 
! icks of Northfield and Carlton M. 
1 .inn of Sunderland. Professor 
1 uaife accompanied them on the 
t ip. 

Hugh J. Chisholui, owner of the 
- rathglas farms, takes great pride 
his herd, which he is developing 
i 1 to one of the finest in the country. 
He treated the men of the visiting 
teams most hospitably ami they all 
1 port a very enjoyable trip. 



SENATE DISCUSSES CHANGES 
ON MEALS AT DINNING HALL 

After Interview With Tha Authorities 

Decides To Try New System In 

November. 

At last week's mneting of the Col- 
lege Senate, the subject of uew meal 
hours at the Dining hall was taken 
up and discussed with Mr. Chesley, 
the steward, and Treasurer Keuriey, 
» ho had been invited to appear before 
that hotly. President Hall explained 
t<> them that the students were in 
favor of trying out the new arrange- 
ment of meal hours provided the 
puce of board remained as it is. 
When asked by oue of the Senate 
a. embers if the change would increase 
the price of board, Mr. Chesley re- 
plied that he thought it would but 
could not give any definite reasons 
why, except that be thought the fel- 
lows would eat more. The Senate 
took exception to this, as they could 
sol understand why a simple Inter- 
changing of the present dinner and 
•upper would necessitate an increase 
if the present rules in regard to 
Moond helpings were rigidly enforced. 
After considerable discussion of the 
unions phases of the problem, it was 
liiially agreed that the new system of 
saving lunch at noon and dinner at 
night be tried out for one month, be- 
>ing Nov. 1. Id case the new 
scheme is found to cost more than the 
present arrangement, the students 
have the option of either return- 
to the old system at the old price 
'•: continuing the new system with the 
possibllttj of an increase In the rate. 
This matter being for the moment 
s ttiedi the Senate then turned to a 
genera] discussion of the food at 
|ii seat served at Draper Hall. It 
the concensus of the undergrade 
opinion, at least, that better food 
Id be served there at the present 
1 of four dollars a week. Several 
iples were given of food which, 
I technically all right was un- 
table, if nothing more, Gioiosa 
If emphasized particularly the fact 
a great number of the men who 
board at the dining hall do so 
••• U out of loyalty to the college 
** the students to whom waiterships 
Ivan. With the increasing num- 
of outside eating places, be 
,f " bt the management could not 
i to lose the patronage of any 
11 nf because of pooi food. Mr. 



lions at the dining hail provided the 
students would co-operate to the ex- 
tent of pointing out the defects in the 
present system. An agreement was 
finally reached whereby the head- 
waiter, Schlotterbeck "IT., would in 
the future bring to the direct atten- 
tion of Mr. Chesley all focal which is 
found unsatisfactory, together with 
the student making the complaint. 
In this way the management hopes to 
make the dining hall improve its ser- 
vice and satisfy the fancies of eveu its 
most fastidious [nitrous, but no inti- 
mation was given by either Mr. 
CheBleyorMr. Kenney that beefsteak 
dinners would become any more com- 
mon than they are at present. 



COME OVER 
LET'S GET 
ACQUAINTED 





college man 



NINETEEN-FIFTEEN NOTES 

Our schedule : Tufts game, "Aggie 
Night," ami a lot of *l,'i men there; 
then Springfield game, with a 'lf> 
reunion, ami half the class there. 
"Hill" Dorun will have charge of the 
affair, so send word to him that you 
will be there. Address. M. A. C. 

Frank Ititell has been about college 
recently, having been in Canada for 
the month previous. 

"Piiikey" Clark has a new job as , 
herdsman, now being in Sulli.dd,Coiiii. 

li Danny" Fitzgerald is traveling. 
He was last heard from in Detroit, 

beaded Webt. 

"Ned" Parker is doing graduate 
work at the University of Illinois and 
Rartly is at the I'nivcrsitv of 
California. 

"Chef S|>offord is working for 
Lane St Co. aud has been time-keeper 
at the Notch during the summer. 

■'(•rover" Cleveland is farm man 
ager of the Reform Hcbuol at 
Sherborn. 



We are ready to show you everything that the 

needs for comfort in the way of clothes. Here are a few 
oi our many offerings, and remember they are in 

every ease the best of their kind. 

Hart Schaff ner & Marx Beady Clothes 

In just the styles you're looking for — Pour other good makes. 

MACKINAWS FROM $5 UP 

See the famous Pali iik line before \on get ynurs. 

Will s;i\ e \ ou money . 
The Oakes Sweater is the best made at any price. 

THE PRICES ARE FROM $5 TO ST 

Absolutely pure wool and made to wear. 

COMPLETE LINES OF SOFT HATS AND CAPS IN THE LATEST SHAPES AND C0L0RIN6S 



Exclusive Custom Tailoring at Pair Price* 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



f. 



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ALUMNI NOTES 

Kx-'IM'i.— C. A. Blair, acting store 
keeper for the (J rand Trunk system, 
Portland. Me., was on the campus 
dining the past week. 

*I3. — The copyright on the college 
song, "Sons of Old Mass'ehusetts" 
passed to the associate alumni on 
Oct. 8. This has been in the hands 
of Dean F, Baker 'IS, who bought 
it in 1U1I from Mr. Chad wick, the 
writer of the music. Mr, Baker 
■bowed himself to be a loyal alumnus 
by selling it to an organization within 
the college at a price less than he 
paid for it. Copies may now be had 
at the treasurer's otlice . 

*H. — A. I*. Tower was men on 
the campus Saturday, He is now 
the prineial of Charlestown High 
School, N. II. 

'15. — Cheater A. Bishop is at 
home in Peterborough, N. II., recu- 
perating after six weeks spent in a 
Iloston hospital with typhoid fever 
He was working in Cohasset and will 
return there the first of November. 

'15.— Donald Cande has left the 
ley replied that seldom, if ever. Hood Farm at Ixiwell where baa 



neh cases been brought directly 

* attention, and that he would 

in his power to improve eondl- 



has been working with Hood's Jersey 
herd to accept a position on a Hol- 
itein farm in Dover, N. H. 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 



1QC7 THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD 
lOOf FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS 



1915 



Your Opportunity 

The editor of one of OUT leading agricul- 
tural paper* write* us under date of January 
12th, 1915, as follow* :- 

"I am doing all I can to induce farmers to 
plant gram asps this year. 

"Grain is very high and it is going higher. 
Wheat is going to $2.00 per bushel and other 
gram will share in the advance. Wheat costs 
$2.50 per 100 pounds now, nnd pound for 
pound oar* coat as much. 

"It «eems to me that the eastern farmer** 
salvation is to buy plant food and grow 

CORN, WHEAT* BARLEY, 
OATS AND BUCKWHEAT 

"Last fall I doubled my acreage of winter 
wheat and this spring I shall triple the acreage 
of oats. I managed to produce 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre, and sold the straw at 
$1 7.00 pa 1 ton in the baa.** 

THE OrTKHrTUNiTY IS YOURS! 
B« iure that 71m boy 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

They are available plant foods that mere than meet the most 
exacting requirement*, giving plump, sound, full heads of grab and vigor- 
ous, healthy •haw. 

Eastern users of E. Frank Coe Fertilizers are raising 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre. The average for the United States for three yean 
is I 4i'a bushels to the acre. 

THE OWOrTUNlTY IS YOURS ! WILL YOU MAKE THE MOST OF IT ? 



V 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, §1 Chambers St, N. Y. 



y 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 26, 1915- 



11 



^SSS",:i« j Tlie Massachusetts Asricultural Colleee 1 f™ TAI » ™ 

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The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillinan and Barnes streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is ■ modern hos- 
telry run on the European Plan. It is just ,1 step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices SU and up; rooms 
with bath (single) •I.SO and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
loom makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 



A student may specialize in the following subjects 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



Moore's Swan s 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select fr< 

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evening. 



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STUDEHTFUBJIITUBE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITUhE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

E. D. MARSH KSTATE 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated uooklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



COX SONS 



— AND — 



jr 

rnKSKk V I NING 

71-74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C Athletic Kied Association, 

The College Semite, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association, c - 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Slockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 

II. M. Gore, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

S. W. Hall, Piesident 

C. W. Moses, Manager 
A. W. Spaulding, Manager 

D. A. Ricker, Manager 
.. Iluutiugton, Jr., Manager 

Moorhouse, Manager 

H. Aiken, President 

J. T. Nicholson, Manager 

F. A.. Anderson, Manager 

L. K. Fielding, Manager 

F. W. Mayo, Manager 

A. J. Hicks, President 

C. H. Clou Id, President 

H. F. Taber, President 



w 1 M 1 i-l BOOK AGKNTS, 
Both sexes, for best seller published. Particu ,.i» 

and outht free. 
OKO. \V. «OMKKS, l-S. SI. AusjuHIiw. Mb. 

COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 

MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 

E. M. BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave AOOIE COLLEOE lor HOL- 
YOKF at 15 mln. past the hour. 



CARS 



There *re Se»en i»>od Knsnm why youshould 
bay your 



COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

17 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Ctotvi anh Mfm t A. M to 4 A. M 

RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton, MaMachuttetU 
TWO BLOCKS FROM THH DUroT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with 
out extravagance.) More popular 
than ever. 

Special Luncheon 12-2 P. M. 

PRIVATE OININC ROOMS 

A.la Carte Service 
Prom 6- JO to 11 I'. M. 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield. thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
" Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 MHe» of Trackage - modern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System -Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



Leave AMHERST lor AOOIE COL- 
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IfNUCUtlt 



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KIHERST I SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 



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For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
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MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE: 



Vol. XXVI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 2, 1915. 



DAVID STARR JORDAN 

ADDRESSES ASSEMBLY 



Chancellor of Leland Stanford Univer- 
sity Speaks to Student Body on 
Causes of the European War. 

■It is a sharp remedy for disun- 
ion and decaying patriotism," said 
David Stan- Jordan, chancellor of 
I .land Stanford university, at the 
regular Wednesday assembly last 
peek. He was speaking on the 
•■Causes of War," and a large num- 
ber of townspeople as well as the stu- 
dent body heard him. Professor 
Jordan continued in part : — 

'By disunion, I mean internal 
imitation such as pacifism, antimili- 
laiism and socialism. As years have 
gi >ne by, freedom has gradually broad- 
rued down to the common people, and 
the nobility and kings resent it for it 
lias meant a loss of power to them. 
Tlu! United States has been s heavy 
burden on Kuropean aristocracy, 
h or merry tLeconiiiiou people used to 
rise in rebellion in order to gain a de 
Mudpiivilege. Now they no longer 
rine in arms, but use the ballot 
box instead. 

The aristocracy of Europe were in 
I ■< session of their countries' tools of 
par, that is; the army, navy, and 
:n marnent factories, and they felt that 
there should be outside fighting to 
inn the attention of the people away 

mi internal unrest and socialism. 

l-oreign war cures waning patriotism. 

This was oue of the reasons that 

ight about the war in Europe. 

Sinee the war there has not been s 

[Cuntlnned on page ti 

INFORMAL COMING SATURDAY 

M <ldlebury Game on Alumni Yield 
Added Attraction for Quests. 



V 

fo 

w 



I 



I be second informal of the year 

II be held Saturday afternoon, 
v. 6, immediately following the 
•Iball game with Middlebury. 
th this added attraction, especially 
< e the bleachers on Alumni field 
I accommodate a good crowd, a 
i'lication of the attendance of last 
'lib'* informal is expected. The 
Idlebury game, though looked 

on as an easy one for M. A. C. 

(1 be no walk over, as was proved 

1 year. Here is s chance, there- 

\ to kill two birds with one stone 

watch a good football game and 

tin the beat informal of the year. 

sit: for the informal will be fnr- 

Ued by the college orchestra. 

kets may be obtained from George 

mer *16 t Room 3, South College. 



STUDENTS AND ALUMNI JOIN IN FORMAL 

DEDICATIO N OF NEW ST 0CKBR1DGE HALL 

A FINE BUILDING FIFTY YEARS IN COMING 



Addresses by W. H. Bowker 71 and Dr. J. L. Hills 81 Feature 

the Afternoon's Program. Organ Recital in 

Evening Much Enjoyed. 



Stock bridge Hall was formally 
dedicated and opened to the public 
to exercises held in the auditorium 
Friday afternoon before a surprisingly 
small number of faculty, students and 
townspeople. Excellent music waB 
furnished by the college orchestra, 
uuder Laird's leadership, and the 
speaking, while long-drawn-out, was 
very interesting. 

Mr. W. H. Bowker , chairman of 
the building committee on the board 
of trustees spoke on the subject 
"Levi Stnckbridge and Charles L. 
Flint," his personal and humorous 
remarks being much spplanded. The 



dedicatory speech was given by 
Joseph L. Hills 'HI, dean of the col- 
lege of agriculture, University of 
Vermont, who talked on the "Agricul- 
tuial Possibilities of New England." 

Wilfred Wheeler, secretary of the 
state board of agriculture, discussed 
the importance of engineering in con- 
nection with agriculture. President 
Bntterfield then summed up the after- 
noon's information in his own much 
appreciated way, and there followed 
an informal reception in one of the 
large rooms of the main building. 

The speeches of the afternoon are 
found in other columns. 




Stockhkioor Mali. — South East Front. 



R. L. HOLDER '17 CHOSEN 

MANAGER OF FOOTBALL 

Wins Out In Election Held Alter Wed- 
nesday's Assembly. 

At the election held after Wednes- 
day's assembly, Richard L. Holden 
*17 of Haverhill, was chosen mansger 
of vsrsity football for the season of 
I '.tin. He has this fall been manager 
of the winning freshman team, and is 
well qualified for his new position 
which he thoroughly deserves. Hol- 
den's election Wednesday ends a com- 
petition which, for him, has lasted 



ever since his freshman year, when he 
was an unsuccessful candidate for 
assistant manager of baseball. As 
he Is not engaged in other college 
activities he can devote all his time 
to the football managership. He is a 
member of the Lambda Chi Alpha 
fraternity. 



NOTICE 
All M. A. C. men are Invited to 
an informal gathering to be held in 
Grace House on Sunday evening, 
Nov. 7, at 8 o'clock. The speaker 
will be the Rev. Henry A. McNulty, 
(Princeton '01) of Fooehow, China. 



No. 7 



LAST MINUTE BREAK ENDS 
TUFTS GAME IN 14-14 TIE 

Darling Catches Forward Pass, Makes 

Touchdown, and Ties Score After 

Defeat Seemed Almost Sure. 

A 40 yard run by Darling after 
catching a juggled forward puss tied 
up the Tufts game Saturday - It wan 
one of the most exciting games ever 
seen on tin* Tufts oval ; the breaks 
were even and were the deciding fac- 
tor in the contest. Westeottand the 
forward passes made up the chief 
offensive of the Tufts team, while 
Aggie was weak in diagnosing plays 
and breaking up forward*. Captain 
< '111 run was the leader of bis team 
both in name and fact. 

1 iwf <-i taraa. 

Captain Ciirrun won the toss, and 
chose to receive. Palmer ran the 
ball back to the |fl yard line on the 
kick-off. Darling gained live yards 
around end, and Boiled dove through 

the Ifne fin li.. t. bad tU ball 

was brought back and Aggie penal- 
ized 10 yards for "roughing." Pal- 
mer punted and Parks was downed 
on his own to yard line. Druinms, 
Mitchell, and Weateott pushed the 
hall along for a Brat down. M. A. ('. 
was twice penalized for off-side, then 
held and Weslcolt kicked. Aggie 
was again penalized 10 yards. Dar- 
ling, Cumin and Hollo* made I I 
yards, and then Palmer missed a ti \ 
for a drop kick from the A0 yard line 

Tnftfl put the ball into play on In i 
20 yard Hue. and made first down on 
straight football. Dmmmy ami 
Mitchell failed to gain. Tufts w:in 
penalized 16 yards for holding- At 
this time Dunn's knee waa wrenched, 
and Knttrick substituted at right 
guard. Drummy made four yards. 
Tufts was again penalized for hold- 
ing, and after a try around •n-l . 
Westcoti was broad 10 kick. 

Darling caught the ball and was 
tackled on his own 40 yard Hat 
Two attempts by Curran. one by 
Holies awl an incomplete forward 
pass gave the ball to Tufts on Aggie*, 
L*» yard line. Drununy gained Bve 
yards. Parks and Westcott w. 
thrown for three and two yard losses 
respectively, and Tufts was again 
forced to punt. 

Palmer panted and the period 
ended with the ball in Tufts possess- 
ion in tfce center of the Held, 
sacoKP Qoaanta. 

Westcott carried the ball around 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 2, 1915. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov, 2, 191 5. 



the end for l first down. M. A. 0. 
was penalized five yards for off-side. 
W. .stcott gained four yards on a fake 
forward. Druminy gained three 
yards in two attempts. A forward 
pass, Parke to Westcott, to Mitchell 
and a SO yard run by the latter scored 
the first six points of the game, and 
set the Tufts cheering section wild. 
Parks kicked the goal. 

Aggie chose to receive. West- 
cott kicked over the goal line for a 
touchback and the hall was put into 
play on the 20 yard line. Holies, 
Darling and Curran made six yards 
and l'almer kicked out of bound* at 
the M. A. C. 40 yard line. Tufts 
tried two line plays for no gain. 
Aggie was penalized five yards for 
off-side, then after another attempted 
line plunge Tufts was penalized. 
Two forwards, Westcott to .lochitn, 
the first a fluke, netted first down. 

Aggie recovered a fumble on her 
own 111 yard line. Holies made five 
yards, Palmer one, Darling three and 
then Palmer kicked out of danger. 
Parks fumbled the ball and Grayson 
recovered it. Holies made five yards 
through the line, aud Darling three 
around end. Tufts recovered a fum- 
ble on her own 40 yard line. 

Westcott failed to gain around 
the end, A lateral pass. Harks to 
Westcott to Stankard netted H) yards. 
Two attempted forwards were broken 
tip, then Danforth blocked a kick by 
Harks, who recovered the ball aud 
vent eight yards before 1" ing stop- 

• cl. After tin attempted end run 

ml an Incomplete forward by Tufts. 

Grayson intercepted a lateral puss, 

and recovered the ball. A fumble 
again gave the ball to Tufts. Darl- 
ing LnttfOepted a forward puss and 
on the next rush gained I •"« yards. 
Aggie famMed the ball and the half 
ended. Tufts 7, If. A. C. 0. 



TIIIKI) '.'I All IKK. 

Ptlmer kicked off and Westcott 
Carried the ball for eight yards. 

Two attempte by Weatootl and a five 

yard plunge by Drummy gave Tufts 
a first down. Then t'urran inter- 
cepted a forward pass on Tufts' t B 
yard hue and paved the way for 
Aggie's first score. After thr«e first 
downs in which over half the gains 
were made by the plucky captain, he 
carried the ball acrosn for a touch- 
down. Palmer kicked the goal, ty- 
ing the MSOI 

Hut trick kicked off. Westcott 
gained 1- yards and first down. 
Then tin Aggfa line In Id and West- 
COtt punted, the bail rolling OVW the 
goal line for a touchback. The hall 
ffu put Into play on the 20 yard 
line. Holies gained four yards: 
Darling, three ; and Cur ran, am. 
l'almer failed to make first down and 
the ball went to Tufts on Aggie's 
28 yard line. A line plunge by 
Mitchell and a trick forward, Parks 
to Weatcott, to Nelli* to Sanborn, 
brought the hall to Aggie's five yard 
line. 

Here the M. A. (\ team braced 



and threw the Tufts men for a loss of 
10 yards in the next four downs. 
After two small gains by Cm ran 
and Darling, Palmer punted and 
Westcott signaled for a fair catch on 
his own 47 yard line. 

Nellis gained three yards through 
the line, but Tufts was penalized 15 
yards for holding. A forward pass, 
Parks to Westcott to Stankard, net- 
ted 12 yardB and the quarter ended. 
M A. 0. 7, Tufts 7. 

FOURTH quaktek. 

Dunn returned to the game replac- 
ing Huttrick. Aggie held and re- 
ceived the ball on downs on her own 
•in yard line. Palmer kicked out of 
bounds at the 46 yard line. Tufts 
made one first down and was then 
held and forced to kick. 

Holies, Curran and Palmer could 
not make the required distance and 
l'almer punted. Stankard made 
four yards on the next down. Nellis 
could not find a hole in the line, but 
Westcott carried the ball around the 
end for eight yards and first down. 
Parks circled around the end for 19 
vards more. Several attempts at 
passes were made, but were incom- 
plete, and Aggie again took the ball. 
Curran made four yards and a short 
forward to Darling netted seven 
yards and first down. 

However, on the next play, Pryor 
intercepted a forward and ran 40 
yards for Tufts' second touchdown. 
Harks kicked the goal. Once agaiu 
the Tufts rooters were up on their 
feet. Their cheering was too prev- 
ious. 

M. A. C. received the kick and 

Orayeon carried the ball in yards to 

the 18 yard line. Murphy was put 
in quarterback. Palmer shifted to 
full, and I'.olhs out. With but a 
minute anil a half to play Palmer 
threw a forward pass which bounced 
off Grayson ami Mitchell into Darl- 
ing's hands, who carried the ball for 
a touchdown. Haliucr kicked the 
goal during a breathless pause and 
then "all ell broke loose." 

With a half minute to play. Palmer 
kicked off. Darling intercepted a 
forward on the first down, and 
l'almer punted. The game was over. 

The lineup : 

M. \. < . TtM i- 

|».i\. re. ''• Mankard 

|>;i!if«>rtli. n H-. Hrown 

Dunn. Huttrick, njf. Iff., Morrliwm 

Perry, ■-. <•., I'ryi.r 

.Ionian. It;. !«.. llcacluini, Uilmtt 

[tainted, It, " . Tliouuiike 

i.i;,\»,.n. |« ■•■.. Joeblro, Benborn 

Parmer, Murphy, nb. <|i».. Parks 

Darling, rhh, » i» i * . . Mitchell 

< niniti. Weeks, Ibb. rfeb . Westcott 

lUtllv-H. Pnhner.fi. 11... Drimnney. Nellis 
ionre— M, \ I 14, Tuft- 14. "flaw** 
downs — Mitchell, Pryor, Unrran, thirl- 
ing, (hm\* from touchdown*— Palmer 
2. Parks J!. fiefem- — Andrew*, Vale. 

I'lnjun' -McCarthy , Georgetown. Head 
llneajoati K. H.ilreeo, Harvard, Sfcetee- 

Hieii— Si'lllnltel lit-ek, M . A. V.\ \Uig- 

gerab Tuft*. Time— four I. ".-minute 
period*. 



MIDDLEBURY TO PLAY ON 
ALUMNI FIELD SATURDAY 



Vermont College Comes for Annual 

Game with a Fair Season's 

Record. 



')5. _W. R. Tower is manager of 
I poultry plant at Shrewsbury. 



Middlebury college will be the 
opponents of the M. A. C. football 
team in the second home game of the 
season on Alumni field Saturday. 
The Vermont team is light but fast 
and should prove to be good practice 
material for the Springfield game of 
the following week. They have 
been defeated by Amherst, Tufts and 
Springfield among the teams inter- 
esting to Aggie supporters and have 
failed to show a great deal in the line 
of consistent football. Last year 
they were beaten by Aggie in a 7-0 
game but the home team was pretty 
well crippled from the Tufts game of 
the week before. The game was 
especially memorable for the long 
run of Darling when he intciupted a 
forward pass and ran *7 yardB for 
Aggies only touchdown. 

To revert to the ever interesting 
topic of the M. A. C. team all of the 
players came through the Tufts game 
in good shape and there is a minimum 
of injuries on the squad. Dunn's 
knee is bothering him some and it is 
more than likely that he will be kept 
out of the Middlebury game on that 
account. Week's shoulder which 
kept hint out of most of the Tufts 
game may result in his staying on 
the side lines Saturday but Holies 
ably demonstrated at Medford that 
he can be depended upon to fill the 
vacancy nicely although he does not 
have the weight of Weeks. Captain 
Curran has had a slight charley-horse 
but it did not bother him much in the 
game against Tufts and is not likely 
to in the later games. Palmer's bad 
ankle is coming nicely and all in all 
the team is as free from injuries as 
any college teem e*n hope to be at 
this stage of the season. 

Thus far Captain Curran's team 
has as good a record as any team 
that baa ever represented the college. 
Opening the season against the husky 
Dartmouth eleven, they held them to 
18 points. The following week they 
lined up against Haughton's famed 
Harvard machine and the crimson 
was very luck? to score the one 
touchdown that they did. Kxcept 
for Cornell. Aggie has held Harvard 
to the lowest score of the season. 
The following week saw the team 
triumphing over Colby to the tune 
of 20-0 on Alumni field and the next 
week they went down to Worcester 
and played Holy Cross to a 7-7 tie. 
Then came the easy '21-0 victory over 
Worcester Tech and the Tufts game 
which ended in a 14-14 tie in one of 
the most bitterly fought coutests ever 
seen on the oval in which an Aggie 
team proved that the word "out- 
gamed" had been stricken from its 
vocabulary. 
In two weeks comes the Springfield 
the center of interest from now 



on. Never has an Aggie tea 
showed the promise of a victory th; 
the 1915 team does. Alumni acl 
undergraduates alike unite in payin- 
tribute to what appears to bethebes 
football machiue that M. A. C. h»- 
ever turned out. 



LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 

The first meeting of "Le Cerch 
Francais" will be held in Room G. 
South College, Wednesday evening 
Nov. 8. The meeting will be a strict 
ly business one and will endeavor to 
plan for the year's work. The French 
club was organized on a firm basi- 
last year. A program was arranged, 
constitution drawn up, and officers 
elected. The meetings are cou 
ducted in French and include read- 
ing and discussion of French litera- 
ture. The heads of the French de- 
partment are usually present. Tin 
officers hope that all interested in th. 
club will turn out to this first meet 
ing. A cordial welcome is given to 
all Freshmen who have had at least 
one vear of French. 



WEDNESDAYS ASSEMBLY 

[i'untlnaad from p««e ij 



word mentioned in England about 
land reform. There has not been a 
word about the temperance ciuestioii 
except when liquor discommoded tin 
making of firearms. 

The second cause of the war is the 
number of gray old strategists, who 
have designed and own contrivances 
to sink ships and blow out whole 
towns in a moment. These men 
couldn't go down to their graves with 
out trying out the instruments the] 
had invented. They wanted to get 
up a war and even figured out when 
they would have it. The greatest 
trust in the world is established in 
Essen, Germany. The companies of 
Armstrong and Nickers in England 
are of the same sort. In all of these 
companies the stock is held by the 
aristocracy. These establishments 
have corrupted the whole world 
These compauies have kept the Bal- 
kans stirred up and now have aided il 
causing the greatest of wholesale 
murders. 

Internationa) hatred doesn't amount 
to anything except by having nobihiy 
— controlled armies aud navies behind 
It. International friendship will 
come fast if we can get rid of Ike 
idea that the way to end home trou- 
bles is to have foreign war. 

The two main arguments aga*r»-<i 
war are i first, every phase of war 'm 
wicked. Murder is murder even 
though done on a large scale with Un- 
sanction of kings and the blessings of 
the church. Second, warkillsoff I 
brave and the strong letting the nat. P 
breed from the weak. Men tW 
might have been builders of erap 
are "dying like fliei." 

Professor Jordan also told of tt* 
relief work in Belgium and bad t N 
■ale actual food tickets issued by t bl 
Relief Committee to the Behji' »» 
people. 



ND00R RIFLE PRACTICE 

STARTS IN ARMORY SOON 

Hulea Announced for Annual Soph- 
Freshman Rifle Contest. 

Iudoor rifle practice has now com- 
menced and with over 100 men hav- 
,ng signified their intention of trying 
lit, the prospects for a winning team 
seal very bright. The majority of 
the men who have reported are from 
die two lower classes aud the contest 
tweeu these two classes will no 
doubt be keen. 

This inter-class contest was estab- 
lished for the first time last year and 
served very well in bringing to light 
nine varsity material. The plan as 
worked out by last year's captain and 
passed by the Senate was as follows. 

1. An annual iudoor rifle match 
- i ween the sophomores and fresh- 
men shall be established at M. A. C. 
for the promotion of college rifle 
-hooting aud incidentally to co-oper- 
tte with the Military department and 
the Riflle club in teaching the stu- 
dents how to shoot. 

2, Asa reward of merit, numerals 
shall be given to the five highest men 
and the manager of the winning team. 

:!. Rules ; 

< a) Each class shall elect a 
mauager who shall i 

(1) be responsible for the use 
of ammunition, targets, 
aud for the cleaning of 
guns. 

(2) Keep a record of each 
man's shooting. 

!'.'>) Pick the twelve best men 
for the team with the aid 
of the coaches, on or be- 
fore Nov. 16. 
(h) Each class shall be repre- 
sented by a team of ten men 
and two substitutes. 

( c) The score of all ten men to 
count in the match. 

(d) The match shall come off 
between Nov. Id and the 
Thanksgiving recess. 

(e) Sergeant Lee and the Cap- 
tain of the varsity shall act as 
coaches and shall have adecid- 
ing influence in picking the 
i"-st men for the teams. 

( f ) The coaches shall also have 
the privilege of limiting the 
number of men on the range 
and the number of rounds they 
may fire. 

(g) Practicing for the match 
shall lie done under the rules 
governing the varsity practice. 

(hi No man who was one of 
the first ten men of last year's 
team shall be allowed to com- 
pete on either team. 
fj) Each team shall elect its 
own captain after Nov. 1*>. 
The National Rifle Association has 
ie a decided change in the method 
indoor snooting which will go into 
t -I'X this year. According to the 
f< e ruling there is to be no off-hand 
il oting. All the shooting Is to be 
f m the prone position at a distance 
" in feet. Just what effect this will 
■ upon college teams ai a whole 
not be estimated but it is safe to 
that it will throw them more into 
Hass, for prone shooting is less 



difficult than the off-hand method. 

Last year there were four classes 
of rifle teams in the colleges of the 
United States. Aggie has always 
stood in the first class since 1907 
which marks the date of her entering 
her first team. Since then whenever 
she did not win first place she has 
won second. It seems that a team 
having made such a marvellous stand 
is deserving of the best support of 
every Aggie man. Yet there are lots 
of men on the campus today who, if 
you were to ask them, could not direct 
you to the indoor rifle gallery. 

Says Captain Gaventa,"our ambi- 
tiou this year is to turn out a team 
that will make Aggie's record of past 
years even moie marvellous. The 
assistance which you may be able to 
render in this respect cannot be esti- 
mated until you have given yourself 
a trial. Are you going to try out for 
the team?" 



REMARKS BY PRESIDENT AT 
ST0CKBRIDGE DEDICATION 

"For nearly fifty years this col- 
lege has taught agriculture without 
the facilities provided by a building 
specifically devoted to that subject. 
Now we have a building such as 
could not have been hoped for, even 
a few years ago. The long wait has 
gained us our best building, and the 
•stone which the builders rejected 
has become the head stone of the 
corner.' 

"Agriculture as an industry bai 
long lagged in public estimation. 
Although one of the oldest occupa- 
tions of mankind, for centuries il 
was pursued without much intelli- 
gence. Now, the world over, scien- 
tific tilling of soil is recognized as a 
fundamental in maintaining good 
civilization. The stone which the 
builders rejected has become the 
bead stone of the corner. 

" Agriculture as a subject of study 
has had a long struggle for recogni- 
tion in the schools. ft was thought 
that 'anybody' could farm. It was 
doubted that agriculture had in it 
the materials for education. Now 
we are developing a great public 
system of agricultural education as 
an organic part of our democratic 
education. Once again the stone 
which the builders rejected has be- 
come the bead stone of the corner. 

" In the history of this college 
there have been times when men lost 
faith in the mission of the college as 
a distinctively agricultural institu- 
tion. Now we have come to our own 
and discovered where our great op- 
portunity lines. This splendid ma- 
terial equipment will help us to put 
aud keep agriculture to the front in 
all our works and plans. 

"So it is probably fortunate that 
we have waited so long for our agri- 
cultural group. We now have build- 
ings that are beautiful in design, 
adequate in their plan and equip- 
ment, and permanent in their con- 
struction. They represent the very 
heart of our work \ they are worthy 
of any institution. Tbey are also 
symlKjIs of great things ; they are 
monuments to strong men with wide 
vision ; they are prophesies of 
trained leadership in rural affairs ; 
they are an earnest of a reign of 
helpfulness to the people of this 
common wealth." 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN A DYER, Props. 

Loose-Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
—Pens— 



ONE 



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OF MAGAZINES 



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.ul\ ertlsement 



An Especially Uood Commission Proposition— 

Cash for test orders— Article wideh Adt 
Cuts down expense in power plants- Addrt II 
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Philadelphia, I'a 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and lirjss I'ipe, Valves 
and Fittings lor Steam. Watei ami OaS, \sl>estos 
and Magnesia Hoiler and Pipe Ct I'ipe 

Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. I Ineeis ami 
Contractors foi Steam and lint Watei Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and l r ngine 
Connections, Holyoke, Mass. 

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Candies and Ice Cream 



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Dentist 

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Evenings by Appointment 

hold Ularren 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T. «J. AHERN. MANAGrR 



J% 9 CJ are supplied every year 

DUrDee S deedS ^ectto more Ameri- 
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the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow'* ? Jf not, we would like- to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, — a hright new hook of 1 82 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 



Page's 



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SPECIAL. NOTICE 



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KISlr^AIKIIVC;- Double-wear Leather used. 



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and South Hadley, Mass. 



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These Studio* offer the best skilled 
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The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 2, I9'5 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening 
i.s the Student* <>f the Massaehu- 
setts A u run 1 1 ma l College- 

BOARD Of BOTTOMS, 

TYLKB S. R08KM t*. i;.llt»i-in-< rtlef 

111(11 A i;l> W SMITH 'IT. M.miiiiinu' Kdilnr 

I RANK I SCIIKI I KIT. I'.. ,\H*i*tutit Editor 
THUS. I.. IIAKK«M KS HI. 

u.i i;l.i> A.(,in|tis\ i«;. 
i.w iiiii i r. r.AUM'S i»s. 

MILPORD B. LAW IS KM KIT. 
1 .1.1 lol IIKNItKISSiiN 17. I»c|«irliiicnl Kititor 
W II. MA M S \ VII. I. K. .11!. 17. ( HRBM BfittOT 
KAKOLD K. .IuNKSIh. i — o cll>«« Kdltor 

\l MSSllAKl.t) LAN I'll hA It 'I*. Asito'e Editor 



Athlftlc Editor 

AthletU 1 Editor 

Alumni Editor 

Ni«H Kditnr 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

(HAS. K III VIIMJTOV.IIS. 18, 

i.usiiHHs ibunvwi 

MKUItll.l. P. W AISNKU'IT. 

UnMul HoalttMi Manure* 

ii am k i i n.i.i'iN". it, 

MiwrtiKiutt Mtnift 
JAJtraC POWELL "W, - ir. ulatloi, 



BttfaMrtption W.60 per >«•;»!•. Single 
eoplee, 6 eente. Kike all orders peye* 

1,1, tfl OU kKLKB V. lliMIN<iT<.\, .lis 

EnteredaeeeeotMl rkwi mntlei ■•">"■ k «•> 

Po*| ttlll.c 

Vol. XXVI. Tuesday, Nov. 2. No. 7 



"AoOTt Nk.mt" :it the Colonial 
Theatre in BottOB after the Tufts 
_:.me Afforded the people of the hub 
:i decided novelty in the form of a 
college celebration without rough 
BOOM. The only excitement was the 
singiug of the college song between 
the acts and a few yells for the team. 
Tti- Aggie nieu showed themselves to 
o thorough gentlemen and the raaua- 
■.ement said they were the best man- 
ured crowd that ever came to the 
theatre. To mauy of the students, 
Aggie Night was a pretty tame affair, 
but if they will stop and think, they 
will see how hard it is for outsiders to 
draw the line between a "celebration" 
:iIll | ; , ••disturbance." A college is 
»fter all. best advertised by the geu- 
ilemanly conduct of its students ami 
not by over exuberant outbursts of 
"college spirit." 



specialties, for they realize that the 
florists of this section are much inter- 
ested in the show. A few of the pri- 
vate gardenei'B around the state are 
also intending to send something of 
interest. 

Much interest is being shown by 
the students in floriculture, who are 
anticipating the competition provided 
for them. For the Juniors there will 
be a competition in table decoration, 
while the Seniors will have a compe- 
tition in the arrangement of flower 
baskets. In addition to these compe- 
titions, there will be vase and box 
arrangements, plant baskets,bouquets 
and corsages. There will be exhibit* 
of pottery, baskets and various other 
types of containers, together with 
other accessories of the florist. 
There will be groups of house plants, 
Christmas plants, foliage plants and 
other groups of interest. 

There will be a large showing of 
chrysanthemums, both single stem 
and bush plants. They will be used 
in named collections, in masses, in 
groups of foliage and flowering plants 
and in floral arrangements. Al- 
though the chrysanthemum will l>e 
dominant, roses, carnations violets 
and other florists' flowers and plants 
will be freely used. 

The Northampton and Ilolyoke 
Gardeners' and Florists' club is to 
cooperate with the M. A. C. Forists' 
and Gardeners* club for a joint meet- 
ing one evening of the show. 



The Freshmen have turned out one 
of the best football teams that has 
represented an entering class in some 
years. Though their schedule was 
somewhat ligher than in previous 
seasons, yet it was by no means easy, 
especially in the games with the Con- 
necticut Literary Institute, Williston 
and Monson. The best game of the 
schedule was that with WilliBton. 
For the first time since a Freshman 
team has played the Kasthampton 
boys, it was able to come out victo- 
rious. Much credit is due Mr. Gore 
for the development of such a speedy- 
squad. Starting with a team of 
green men, five who had never played 
football, he has rounded out several 
speedy playere. Much promising 
materal for next year's vassity team 
is expected. Following is the sum- 
mary of the games : 

Oct. i. Freshmen I 

Conn. Literary Institute 7 
Freshmen 7 Williston () 

Freshmen 64 Ciiieo|»ee £1 i«ti *> 
Freshmen '£\ 

Pa w fl e ld A cademy o 

Freshmen 13 

MuiiHoii Aiadeiny tt 



Drop in and look over a set of 

LIPPINCOTT'S FARM MANUAL 

By far the best "series" for the 
busy man. 

A NEATLY CARVED WALNUT CASE WITH 
EVERY COMPLETE SET 



We also have a line of Scientific 
Books which might interest you. 



JOHNSON BOOK CO 

85 Pleasant Street. 



Oct. u. 
Oet. 10. 
Oct, **. 

Oet. 3(1. 



•o!». —Paul B. Alger is managing 
the Fenton Brook Farm in Great 
Partington. He may be addressed at 
Great Barrington, B F. D. No. 8. 



AUTUMN FLOWER SHOW 
Annual Event Scheduled for Nov. 7. 

The department of iloiiculturc is 
busily engaged making the final plans 
and arrangements for its Autumn 
Flower show ami exhibition of lloial 
arrangements. It has been decided 
t,, open the show "ii Sunday. Nov. 7, 
from 2 until 10 P. K., in order that 
more people from the surrounding 
towns may have an opportunity to 
visit the show- The show will con- 
tinue through Monday ami Tuesday, 
Nov. 8 and 9, being open from 10 

i, M. to HI 1', M. 

The entire first floor «f French hall 
wiU'be used for the various exhibits. 
There will be exhibits of interest to 
the florist and gardnar as well as 
to the general public. At the request 
of the Northampton and Holvoke 
Gardeners* and Florists' elub, spedal 
classes, open only to their members, 
have been arranged, Several of the 
trade florists in the East have signi- 
fied their intention of sending in ex- 
hibits of new varieties and other 



FRESHMEN WIN FINAL 

GAME OVER MONSON, 13-6. 

Bring to Close Successful Season with 
Victory. 

The Freshmen brought to a close a 
most successful season Saturday af- 
ternoon when they defeated the fast 
Munson Academy team on the latter s 
grounds by a score of 13 to 6. Nine- 
teen nineteen played its usaal 
strong offensive game and also out- 
classcd the academy boys in the de- 
fensive. Not until uear the end of 
the game was Monson able to break 
through the Aggie line for a touch 
down. In the last few minutes rushes 
by Comec ami Demarse resulted in a 
score. Aggie's two touchdowns were 
made by Poole and Williams. These 
two men, together with Whittle 
played a strong game for the Fresh- 
men. 

The line-up of the Monson game : 

\. < . I l:l-ll MIA. 



The Survival 
of the Fittest 




UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faitk 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

REGULAR AITNIMY SKKVICK AT 7 P M. 

COW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 

Suits Cleaned. Pre»sed and Dyed. All kinds .11 
Repairing tor Ladies and Gentlemen neatl> 
High-grade work by first-class tailor. Wort 
called for and delivered. Sell tickets for pre-* 

4 SUITS KiR f I 50 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, PROP 

Mam street, Amherst, Mass Nash HI. ■ 

On your wa? to the Post Office Tel. 43 s - w 

E. E. MILLETT 
JEWELER and OPTOMETRY 1 

L*ns*» ground while you watt 

College Jbwrlky 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Btfifcgl 

AMHKKHT. MASN. 
Next to Post Office. 



M. 



MoVHOV 



1 rmgreM 

ri , Fletcher 

1 H llijrjjintmn 

i% Lewla 

lit, Crowthet 

it, .Inhnnon 

1h. Duiiloy 

»|l>, Hrjulre 

rhlt,<'Hinl>y 

ihii, Dem ar se 

eh. Goatee 

Score: M. A. l\ KrenlumMi IB, Mmi- 
HKti Aiiwletiiy 6. Stilmtituiitiim - Fresh* 
men; MhIihii for Ban ; Moiiwhi : o'Hrien 
for Fletcher, Fletcher f«»r Csmby. 
TmithflnwiiN: Poole, Williams and De- 
Marge, Goal fr«>!i> touobdown, Whittle; 
£OBlf> mimed, Whittle, Fletcher. Referee. 
Fowler, .siuumlieM Y. M. C. A, College; 
(Tntplre, wood ; head llneeuian, squire. 
Time, tllfmiiniiie quartets. 



Ooolei Ii 

Rons. It 
Wood, lu 
Honda < 
Pay, ryr 
Blafiehafd, IT 
Munnell, fe 
Whtttte, oh 

I'iM.le. III!. 

Williams, rhl 
Faxon. fl>. 



Tried in the furnace of competition 
and teated on nearly 1,000,000 farms 
the world over, the De Laval has 
proved it* superiority to all other 
cream separators. 

Think of all the separators you used 
to see advertised so extravagsatly, 
Where are they now? Why do you 
Seldom, if at all, see their names men- 
tioned ? Simply because the fittest 
must survive and the others must (all 
out of the race. 

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

1«V. nnmdway New \"i^ 

a» K. M:itli»"ti 1*1 . < tilraifn 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, • 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10 

1 1 « 

1 I-2C 

48c per <!"•• 
30c per do/ 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, S1.50 a Suit 



R.T. FsoiT.Agerit; D. Smhimyan, Atst. Ac ' 
Try •« ticket system — - 

Put full name and address on laundr > 



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Stkphkn Lank Foloh 

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pnra and msas .* 
oold. attvant 1am Ntoftaa mhi.a t.« 

S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

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ticulist..' Prescriptlou* Killed. "r^W L*"** 
Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
F'remptly snd Skilfullj Done. 

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FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Orown by the Floricultural Dep» 

We offer our surplus stock of &A 
flowers and plants at reasonable ral I 
to students and faculty. This nock 
Is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions, Roses, carnat 
violets, chrysanthemums and si 
peas in season, 

QROWN ON I Ml CAMPUS 

Tele|»h«»nr 1*0 



WEBSTER'S SDI 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 
Good work speaks for Itself 
Nash Block, Amherst. M 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 2, 191 5. 



ST0CKBRIDGE HALL AND 

LEVI ST0CKBRIDGE 

Address Delivered at the Dedication 

Exercises Friday by W. H. Bowker, 

Chairman of Building Committee. 

We have gathered here to dedicate 
the most important building on the 
Campus. As years go by, larger, more 
expensive and more imposing build- 
ings will be built. They will occupy 
more commanding sites, but none of 
them will excel in importance the agri- 
cultural group, and particularly Agri- 
cultural Hall, hereafter to be known as 
••Stockbridge Hall," for agriculture 
will always be the cornerstone of this 
institution. 

somk historical data. 

We have been asked, why the ag- 
ricultural group was located on the 
north side of the ravine, apparently 
outside the Campus. To answer 
our critics, if there be any, and for 
ihe benefit of our successors, I want 
10 record here and now the reasons. 
It will be remembered that the Col- 
lege was located in Amherst on the 
farms of Hick and Chester Cowles 
after considerable competition for 
it between cities and towns in the 
Mate. The present -Stockbridge 
Imuse was the Chester Cowles farm 
house. Following its location here 
there was much debate about the 
scope of this institution, its course 
1 -»tudy and its polity. Apparently 
it became very heated when the char- 
it ter of the buildings, their grouping, 
and the arrangement of tire grounds 
were under consideration. 

It would appear that in 1S66 the 



tions are gleaned by Professor Waugh 
from Mr. Olmsted's report and let- 
ters extant. Concerning them Pro- 
fessor Waugh writes : — 

'* The essential feature of the Olm- 
sted plan was to lay out the agri- 
cultural college in the form of a model 
village. A central green or common 
was to be designed, apparently on 
the east side of Stockbridge Road 
about where French Hall now stands. 
This common was to be used for a 
playground and for military drill. 
Around this common were to be 
placed the buildings for general use 
which should represent the public 
buildings of a typical New England 
village. His report definitely pro- 
poses four such buildings ; first, a 
classroom building, representing the 
school house of the country village; 
second, a chemical laboratory and 
museum ; third, a library ; fourth, 
a gymnasium, drill hall, and general 
offices, representing in a way the 
town hall of the model village. 

" Another essential feature of his 
plan was that the college community 
should be taken care of in typical 
New England dwelling houses placed 
in the same relationship toward those 
public buildings as are dwelling 
houses in a model village, that is, 
along adjoining streets. Thus he rec 
commended that the president and 
other professors should live in cot- 
tages in this group, and that the stu- 
dents should similarly live in such 
. cottages. He recommended further 
that each cottage should have its own 
grounds and that the cottages and 
grounds should be taken care of by 
the students," 

It appears that there was so much 
friction in the Board, especially rela- 
tive to the style and grouping of the 
buildings, that Judge French resigned. 
He was succeeded by Professor Paul 
A. Chadbourne of Williams College, 



our blunders. No member of the 
present Board will own up to having 



did not think well of the Olmstead 
French plan, for when my class en- 
tered In '67 we found the new build- 1 had a voice in its location ; I think I 
ings, two in number, a big brick dor- ! can establish an alibi. But it is in 
mitory placed where South College 
now stands, and the present old 
wooden building, now the Chemical 



the plan some day or on some dark 
night, surreptitiously, to move it east 
onto one of Professor Brooks* sacred 
Laboratory, standing on the south j experiment plots, then to convert it 
side of the ravine. There are now into a teaching building and build a 



thirty buildings on the College pro- 
perty. 

Clark's board moved I >l instead 
Common or Campus, from the 
Stockbridge Ridge to Chestnut Ridge. 



new dining-hall on the south side of 
the Campus to accommodate a thou- 
sand or more students who will be in 
attendance here before we realize it. 
It was the unfortunate location <>f 



Chestnut Ridge is where South Col- ! Draper Hall and the desire of one of 



lege, the Chapel and the practice 



our faculty to build a henhouse on 



grounds are now located. This ridge the edge of the Campus, that aroused 
was then dominated by a magnificent this Board to the necessity of having 
chestnut tree which was sacrificed in a well-thought-out scheme of land 
1885 for the Chapel, — one of God's ! scape treatment of the grounds. To 
splendid specimens of His handiwork this end we secured the services of 
sacrificed to a very ordinary speti-JMr. Warren H. Manning, the well 



men of man's handiwork ! 

It may not be in good taste to criti- 
cise one's predecessors. They acted 
according to their lights as we are 
trying to do today, but their vision was 
limited; they did not anticipate the 
growth of this institution, or they 
would have left the most command- 
ing spots for important buildings 
which are bound to come. Thus the 



known landscape architect of lloston. 
who generously contributed his time. 
He and Professor Waugh, the head 
of our landscape department, and 
Mr. James R. Richie, the present 
College architect, have made elabo- 
rate studies of the landscape and 
architectural possibilities and needs 
of this institution. Great credit should 
accorded them for the skill, inge- 




AuniTOHirM' — STocRnniDGE Ham 



rustees employed the well-known en- 

neering firm of Shedd Jfc Sawyer of 

>ton to survey the properly. In 

-ame year at the earnesL solicita- 

n of the first president. Judge 

ienry F, French, the service* of the 

known landscape architect, Fred 

>ck Law Olmsted, were secured, 

istted the property in Ma\ .1S66, 

«l reported a month later. Cnfor- 

nalely neither the Olmsted plan 

'f the Shedd & Sawyer survey can 

found, but the following sugges- 



mistakes made in locating the first nuity and good taste displayed. 

minor buildings have necessitated the With the student quarters and a. - 

entire remodeling of the Campus. tivities (entering on Chestnut Ridge 

Another mistake made, I am sorry near the athletic field , with the 

to say in my time, although Professor library to be placed at the town 

Brooks will not agree with me, was in entrance of the grounds with the 

placing the barn wtst of the ( anspus science, experiment and agricultural 

and out of sight. It was placed there groups located around the Campus 

because it was supposed to be the ! and across the ravine — all centering 

center of the farm and therefore ac- around the pond, we believe we have 

cessible for the handling of farm a workable and attractive scheme 

crops. But looking ahead twenty-five which will stand the test of time 

years the barn will not be in the cen- Put time knows no friend and is no 

ter of the farm which the College will respecter of precedent. We hope we 

own then. To the great public the are planning for the best we think 

barn is our most interesting building, we are — but our successors mav wish 

It is visited even now in its hidden we had never been bom to serve on 

out-of-the way place more than any this Poard. 

other budding. It seems to ine that 

... . ., , , , , STUCK URMm.k lltil. 

the bam should have been located on 

the County Road. I Of an agricultural college to wait 

With the barn where it now stands, almost fifty years for its Mall of agri- 

»nd with the central pan of the Cam- culture seems an anomaly. In some 
pus occupied by four minor buildings, ' sister institutions it was the first 

, there was no other alternative than to building to be erected. For one. I 

j place the agricultural group north of ani g ?ad W€ waited. It has taken 

jthe ravine, as near as possible to the h fl V > ,,rs to evolve the kind of a 

barn, and not too far removed from building we wanted. It took five 

the "Hftence buildings, which are now years to plan this one. It took nearly 

located and to be located on the Etst two >' ears to complete it and it cost 

side of the County Road. Hy select- t' 10 - 000 a11 equipped. It is no 

ing this site we have linked up the s^ r <?t that the plans were frequently 

who, on account of ill health served farm ftmifA the agricultural group < hanged. If every bolt is not placed as 

only a few months, but he left his with the science group and expert- Jt »hould be. it is not the fault of the 

stamp on this College in the course : went station group, thus working out building committee nor of Professors 

of itudy which he marked out. He what seems to be a most desirable Formi and Lockwood.nor of the archi- 

was succeeded by Colonel William arrangement. ' tect. Mr. Richie. We have all grown 

S. Clark, who was professor of chem-l S ra y ovcr il including the treasurer, 

1 siry in Amherst College. Clark was WltlBI PM»5. Mr. Kenney, to whom great credit 

president when the College, on Oct. W e shall be asked why we did not is (,ue - II ^iled one contractor. 

2nd, 1867, opened its doors to its orient Stockbridge Hail in sucb a It has l)ea=n ihe subject of strike and 

first class. It number sixty-five way « to avoid its being partial! y o' fife, but at last it is finished, Be* 

students and four years later, ^j, blanketed by Draper Hall, which Bofalit 1 Is ft worthy of its place and 
graduated twenty-seven. 



sticks out like a sore thumb. Draper ° b i«*. an d of the name which it is 




Evidently Clark and his associates j Hall, by the way, is another one of t0 be * r - T» me wi,! le!1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 2, 1915. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 2, 1915. 



LEVI STOCK HRIDC.E. 

Levi Stockbridge, for whom this 
building is named, was a farmer, 
born and raised at the foot of 
Mt, Warner, near the Connecticut 
River, about five miles from 



that neither was the minister cut out 
for the job. 

STOCKBRIDGE AS TEACHER. 

Most distinctly I remember Stock- 
bridge when he took his first class 
into the field in the fall of 1867 to 

I 



< :, npus Like Moses, who had a teach practical farm operations 
vision on Mt. Pisgah as he gazed , remember the newspapers poked fun 
across the Jordan, Stockbridge stood ! at him, but ridicule never daunted 
on his beloved MLWarner and looking! Stockbridge; it was tome to hirn^ 
to the west, across and beyond the | The first thing we did was to 1 husk 
Connecticut, he saw a great country.; and sort corn. Stockbridge d.d not 




View from Stage 



He saw that if agriculture was to hold 
the first place and to continue to be 
•the foundation of its prosperity," it 
would need trained and educated 
men. Thus he was among the first 
in the state to take an active interest 
in agricultural education. When 
the land grant colleges were estab- 
lished under the Morrill Act, he 
worked with Governor Andrew and 



teach then, as we are taught now, 
the importance of seed selection, but 
out of the early field lectures and 
demonstrations at our College, and at 
other similar institutions, grew seed 
selection and testing, which has 
greatly benefited the cereal industry 
of this country. Our next work was 
the picking and packing of apples. 
Stockbridge did not comprehend the 



many others to secure the acceptance importance of grading. W« •*!*> 

of that act on the part of Massachu- culled out the cider apples and called 

setts After the act was accepted the rest number ones. But step by 

and a college of agriculture was se step, the apple industry has gone for- 

red an effort was 8 made to have it ward until we have now graded fruit 

combined with Harvard College as the outcome of held instruct.on 

Phis was stienuously opposed by here and elsewhere. Our next work 

Stockbridge and Clark, and by the was the draining of b*. StOC* 

„*r a lk Thev wanted an bridge stood in the held net back of 
farmers generally. l ne\ waniea an h 

independent institution, and they got the Entomology building with his 
it Clirk and Stockbridge wanted it trousers tucked into his boots, and 
located in Amber*, and they won. literally bossed the job. 1 can sec 
Stockbridge sought no position in him. with his sandy beard, slouch 
the College but when it was opened hat, ill-fitting trousers a man about 
to students it was found that the farm 45 years of age, a tall.lank. humorous 
needed a superintendent and he was yankee. directing our squad .n the 
asked to take that position. He trenches. It made our backs ache 
accepted h and thus he began his for we were growing boys but ere 



are giving here, vocational education 
combined with practical training. 
He believed a man was trained in 
some degree who could do anything 
well, hold a plow or make a plow. 
He felt that we had held up too long 
as our ideal the Websters and Ever- 
etts, the orators and miers; placing 
manner before matter, forgetting that 
men at their benches could think and 
would think, as clearly and sanely as 
men who were trained to express 
themselves in polished English; thus, 
the sooner we recognized trained 
men in all walks of life, the better it 
would be for society. 

Stockbridge had no love of show. 
When he had retired from active 
duty as professor emeritus he still 
took a great interest in the College 
and always attended its commence- 
ments. 1 shall never forget the com- 
mencement at which the boys ap- 
peared for the first time in cap and 
gown. I happened to be standing 
beside him when they marched out. 
He looked at them as if he would 
annihilate them, remarking, "Why 
should those boys come out in caps 
and gowns and ape Amherst College? 
Why can't they stick to the good old 
custom of graduating in a respectable 
suit of clothes? It is all dum flum- 
mery and foolishness!" Everything 
was "dum" with him. 

I said, "Professor, this is not as 
foolish as it seems. These caps and 
gowns are inexpensive, can be hired 
if necessary. Can even be passed on 
from class to class; and they cover 
up, if not a multitude of sins, per- 
haps a multitude of spots and shabby 
suits. It is a uniform garb and it puts 
all on a plane of equality. Your 
democratic notions, if nothing more, 
should commend it. 

"All right," he said. "All right, 
but a man who can't beg. borrow or 
steal a decent suit of clothes in which 
to graduate is not worth a degree 
from If. A. C." 



STOCKf.KIIM.K Mil COLLCGB ISANKKK. 

The College had hard sledding in 
bis day. Montague was its treasurer. 
He was a graduate of Amherst Col- 
lege, but he was no more fitted to be 
the treasurer of the College than I 
would be fitted to be its chaplain. 
"Monty" as we called him, was a 
conscientious, hard working, comi- 
cal looking man. He wore a faded 
brown wig, generally askew. When- 



accepted i, and ,h.s I,- Ixpntt. " • ™ — * » ; CVC r he »as i„ a t*h. place he would 

historic labors for the cause of agn- learnea '"«"" « stockbridge, who is reported 



culture. Though self-taught he soon have neve. <<x*°"*" 

rose to bents. V<*— of agricui. T.. ny mm d Stoc khnfe was an 

ture in .«,., and in ,880 he -as ideal field teacher !• o, one th ng, he 

elected .0 the presidency of the Col- was always en.hu.,.,fc, cheerful and 

ege. He he J I the position for .wo patient He w„ never • ry a. 

yelrs. declining .0 serve longer, dust." He was a bnlb.n talker, as 

but in hi. own quaint language he most; tter, of v.ston are ^.pt '•>*"« 

„id. "I am not cut out for a college — *?°»i •>'• «°' k ' H « >*" "> 

r,,.d=n, ; it chafe, me under .he po»ibili.i«a, .be ulttmate outcome. 

cXr- and » he re.igned in favor He knew , ha. what he -as do,ng .n 
of a ntinister, a. if a minifer trained . >h. "<« «« ?*> ^'^ " 

in an an old-line college would make wa. the begtnn,ng of better things, 

a bette, president of an agricultural P«f.»»r S.ockbndge .yptfied ,n 
institution. It was soon discov 



run to Stockbridge, who is reported 
to have said to him one day, "Now 
keep cool, Monty. Straighten your 
wig, and let's see what we can do." 
Several times it resulted in Stock- 
bridge going to the bank and raising 
money on bis own note or on the 
note of the College endorsed by 
him, with which Monty paid the cur- 
rent payroll. He was not a man of 
large means, perhaps he was worth 
$so,ooo at the time he was signing 
notes for the institution, but he had 



^ed a measure the kind of education we the faith of a Luther, and the courage 



of a Jim Hill. If Stockbridge's lines 
had been cast in Wall Street he would 
have been bold operator; nothing 
appeared to faze him. 

Stockbridge loved this College. It 
was not his Alma Mater, but it was 
in part the work of his brain and 
hand. His influence was always 
helpful, especially with the student 
body. He was the hero of the stu- 
dents of my time for the reason that 
he was extremely human and sympa- 
thetic. As has been said of him, he 
was "a father confessor and an ever 
present help in time of trouble." He 
was the temporary banker of many a 
hard-up boy, but he never to my 
knowledge collected interest, 

11NK MILLION ENOUGH 

On many subjects Stockbridge 
thought ahead ot his time. The Hon. 
Frank P. Walsh, chairman of the 
Commission on Industrial Relations, 
raises the question in his recent re- 
port, if a million dollars is not 
enough for any one man to inherit in 
this country. In a footnote, which 
has attracted more attention than the 
report itself, he offers this sugges- 
tion : 

" It is suggested that the rates o. 
taxation be so graded that not more 
than a million dollars shall pass to 
the heirs. This can be equitably ac- 
complished by several different grad 
ations of taxation." 

Levi Stockbridge anticipated this 
very thing forty-five years ago. In 
one of his class lectures he broke out 
one day with the remark that no 
one should take it all, that no one 
should have the right to more than .1 
stated amount of property, for exam- 
ple, a million dollars. Some years 
after, when reminded of this remark, 
he was asked how he would regular 
the size of fortunes, and he replied 
substantially as follows . 

" 1 would regulate them througli 
the probate court, and if a man's 
estate was found by official expo 
fmisal. (not by the one-sided apra 
we have now) to be worth more then 
the allotted sum, the excess shoul.i 
go to the state." 

When it was suggested that tins 
would be unconstitutional he 
marked, " True, but men make eon 
stiwtions and they will unmake 
them." When it was also suggested 
that it would tend to destroy an 
tion and nullify initiative and effort 
he said in effect : 

«' It would give every man 
chance to amass by lawful mean-, 
not by ■ lawful steals * (as be ten 
stock watering) as much as he c 
during his lifetime, but he must %* 
it away before he died. He sh 
only be allowed to will away, 
leave the probate court to pass u| ' 
a sum not exceeding a stated n 
imum amount, which should be Oil 
maximum prize," 

It was suggested that if U 
scheme were adopted, the Asm 
plan of grving outright the lai 
part of the estate to the oldest 
would still prevail and thus g> 
fortunes would be handed on 



v. ould still go on increasing. He re- 
piied substantially ; 

"Under my plan that scheme would 

extremely hazardous. Suppose 

d man amassed ten million dollars, 

.d knowing that he could will only 
a million, yet he would give outright 
before he died nine million dollars to 
his only son, but before the son had 
disposed of it he might meet with a 
tatal accident, then only one million 

add go to the son's heirs and eight 
millions would revert to the state." 

Stockbridge felt that the effect of 

such a plan, properly safeguarded, 

would not lessen ambition within 

reasonable limits, but would tend to 

lessen greed, and eventually to make 

an inherited plutocracy impossible. 

He believed men, like boys, should 

e prizes to work for and should 

the game according to rules, 

th>it the rules shoulil bt niodijitii to 

nao conditions. Stockbridge 

a what might be termed a " limited 

individualist." He would give the 

ndividual every opportunity up to a 

certain point, and then, as he ex- 

^sed it, " I would clip his wings." 

S ickbridge lived to see the inher- 

■ (nee tax a partial step towards the 

quicker distribution of great fortunes. 

hi* 1 1 in 1 kiiiutions 10 SCIENCK 

As to the value of Stockbridge's 

contributions to science there is 

I nie difference of opinion. His 

experiments in relation to dew and 

cultivation to conserve moisture at- 

tra< ted wide 'and favorable notice, 

• specially in Europe. By a number 

xperimentors he is regarded as 

;hf author of " dry farming." an im- 

ant contribution to agricultural 

practice. 

I tan but feel that he did a great 

k toi agricultural science as well as 

foi agricultural practice. His greatest 

contribution, it seems to me, was not 

liis formulas for crop feeding, for 
li he is known the country over, 
but his novel conception of the office 
fertility. Fertility to him was 
chiefly plant food. Jn practice we 
Mould feed the plant the living thing, 
not the dead inert soil. Thus we 
diould study the plant and its needs. 
1 his scheme the crop waa both the 
Ming and the objective point. The 
iers caught on to this bold de- 
ure. As Stockbridge put it, 
'hey jumped on his band wagon 
>re he was ready to start." 
This new presentation not only rev- 
■ onized our notions of fertiliiers, 
the entire fertilizer industry as 
It immediately raised the 
•' idard of commercial manures 
> ordinary superphosphates em- 
>tj? no potash to complete ferti- 
I more or less specialized, and 
ru m potash. The business re* 
« ed a new impetus and a new rec- 
►: tion in the community. He 
the chief chemical elements of 
ity tangible things to the farmers. 
1 1S74, he, with Goessmann and 
k, were also instrumental in se- 
ig in this state a model inspection 



law, the first of its kind to be pass- 
ed in this country, founded on the 
principle " State what you sell and 
sell what you state," with the neces- 
sary legal machinery of verifying the 
statements. It became the basis of 
similar legislation in other states 
and also the basis of the Federal 
pure food law. 

Levi Stockbridge, self-taught, was 
a wise teacher, a useful citizen, and 
a true friend. In view of his labors 
for the cause of agriculture, his rela- 
tions to the farmers of the State, his 
long and devoted service in this in- 
stitution, and his deep interest in the 
student body, it seems eminently fit- 
ting that Agricultural Hall, the key- 
stone of the arch, should be named 
in his honor. It is supposed to be 
fireproof: let us hope that it will 
stand here for years to come as a 
monument to the unselfish labors of 
one of Massachusetts' liest and most 
loyal sons, and a loyal father of '•< >ld 
Aggie." 

KM NT LABORATORY anh (HAkiKs i.. 
H IN I . 

The first building of the agricul- 
tural group was the Dairy Laboratory, 
a fire proof building completed in 
1912 at a cost of $75,000 all equip- 
ped. It is to be known as the Flint 
Laboratory in honor of Charles Louis 
Flint, ihe first Secretary of the Mas- 
sachusetts Hoard of Agriculture and 
the fourth president of this college. 
Mr. Flint was a farmer's son, a native 
of Littleton. He was graduated from 
Harvard college in 1849 (A. K, >, and 
from the Harvard Law school in 
1X52. (LL.B.) 

About that time the Kssex County 
Agricultural society was offering 
prizes for essays on agricultural sub- 
jects. Young Flint, in the year r». 
his graduation, at the age of twenty- 
five submitted an essay to the 
society " On the History and Import 
ance of the Indian Corn as an Agti 
cultural Product." It was awarded a 
prize of $10.00 but it was so well 
done that it brought him the larger 
prize of public recognition and 
changed the whole course of his life. 
The essay closes with these prophetic 
words, — 

••The natural gifts of one country 
to another, facilitated by commerce 
and the arts, are fast binding together 
the remotest corners of the globe. 
Let the full tide of civilization roll 
on I last commerce bear to every 
land, and to every island in the sea, 
products which shall humanize man* 
kind, and increase the aggregate of 
comfort and happiness! These are 
the fruits of peace." 

It immediately brought him to the 
notice of Marshall P. Wilder, who, 
with Dr. Edward Hitchcock and 
other influential men, were instru- 
mental in founding the Hoard of Agri- 
culture in tS|j. Young Flint had 
gone to New York to practice law, 
but his views were solicited on the 
conduct of the board. He replied in 
a long letter which so pleased the 



baord that they invited him to be- 
come its first secretary, which posi- 
tion he accepted, taking office in the 
spring of 1853. He held the posi- 
tion for twenty-five years. Boards of 
agriculture were founded in other 
states, but Flint, a young man of 
twenty-eight, blazed the way for all of 
them. 

By virtue of his office he was a 
member of the Board of Trustees of 
this institution and served as its 
secretary for twenty-two years, 1863- 
1885. In 1879 he was elected to its 
presidency and held the office for one 
year. He was lecturer in agricultural 
subjects at the college for four years 
from 1868 to 1872. 

How Flint, educated in the classic 
shades of Cambridge was induced to 
give up his chosen professon of law to 
return from New York to take up agri- 
cultural interests and education, 
would be interesting to know, for it 
must be home in mind that in his 
youth agriculture was not a popular 
vocation. AH the promising boys of 
that day were being educated for the 
three professions, ministry, law and 
medicine. Hut at that time there were 
a few far seeking men in the state 
like Marshall P. Wilder, who fell that 
something should be done for the 
larger cause of agriculture. Horti- 
culture was receiving a great deal of 
attention, but general agriculture and 
agricultural education was being 
neglected. The first great step 
towards an improvement was the 
treating of a commission by the Mas- 
sachusetts Legislature, to go abroad 
to study agricultural education, 
especially agricultural schools and 



The agricultural renaissance of this 
state and of this country may be said 
to date from Hitchcock's report, sub- 
mitted to the Legislature in January, 
185 1 , It was not only the forerunner 
of all the state boards of agriculture 
in this country, but of the laud grant 
colleges as well. This report un- 
doubtedly fired young Flint with zeal 
for the cause of agricultural educa- 
tion ; it undoubtedly also influenced 
Representative Morrill of Vermont to 
introduce in Congress in 1858 a bill 
donating public lands for the estab- 
lishment of colleges wherein agricul- 
ture and the mechanic arts should be 
taught, as well as other branches of 
learning. The bill was not enacted 
until 1862, Lincoln signing it July 2. 
By many it is regarded as the great- 
est piece of constructive legislation in 
Lincoln's time, for under it was 
created the great, popular state univer- 
sities of the west like Cornell. Wis- 
consin, Illinois, Purdue with their 
thousands of students, men, women, 
and their enormous plants and teach- 
ing force, visile, progessive, demo- 
cratic. 

Flint as the first secretary of the 
Board of Agriculture came into close 
and intimate relations with the col- 
lege at its formative period. Proba- 
bly he had as much to do in the shap- 
ing of its course as any man in the 
state, outside of the faculty. 

Mr. I lint was a scholarly man. per- 
haps the most broadly educated man 
ever connected with this institution. 
He was a student of the classics ; he 
spoke and read GciUH.ll and French ; 
he was a polished gentleman, modest, 
unassuming, somewhat diffident. He 




AOHOKOMT LABORATORY 



experiment stations. Marshall P. 
Wilder and Dr. Edward Hitchcock, 
then president of Amherst College 
were members of that commission. 
Dr. Hitchcock made the trip to Europe 
and wrote the report. It is an agri- 
cultural classic. And let me say that 
the cause of agricultural education 
in this country is deeply indebted to 
Amherst College on yonder hill for 
its pioneer efforts in its behalf be- 
tween 1840 and iSjq. 



had a retentive memory and would 
often delight his friends with interest- 
ing quotations and reminiscences. 
He loved his work and his books. 
He edited twentV'aix volumes of 
" The Agriculture of jrfliwn husetts" 
and was the author of " Milch Cows 
and Dairy Farming " which for many 
years was a standard text book, He 
also was the author of ** Grasses and 
Forage Plants** and "Manual of 
Agriculture," besides writing many 




8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 2, 1915- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 2, 1915. 



essays and editing other works in- 
cluding the Old Farmer's Almanack. 
He died honored and beloved by a 
large group of friends and thousands 
of farmers. It is fitting that the 1 )airy 
Laboratory of the agricultural group 
should be named in his honor. May 
it. like Stockbridge Hal), stand here 
for years to come as a monument to 
the memory of a man who had the 
courage to desert the classical fields 
of learning at a time when it took 
courage, to become a teacher and a 
leader in bucolic branches of thought 
and activity. 



THE GROWTH AND POSSIBIL- 
ITIES OF AGRICULTURAL 
EDUCATION IN NEW 
ENGLAND 

By .1. L. Hili>, 
ttoan ..1 tin- College "i Agriculture <•> 

(lit- lnistTsilN <>f Viiinoiil. 

Stockbridge Hall is the outward 
ami visible sign of an inward and 
abiding conviction in the future of 
agricultural education in New Kng- 
land : a belief that in collegiate halls, 
high school class rooms, little red 
->. bod houses, and farmers' fields, 
generations of children, young men 
and old. will be educated not only j 
"for'* but "by means of" agriculture. 
Many of the state colleges have j 
thus honored the services and per 
petuated the memories of pioneers 
ID this field. Kzekieal Holmes, tather 
of improved agriculture in Maine, 
professor (A agriculture in the fast 
North American agricultural school,! 
is memorialized at the Tniversity <>f 
Maine in the form of Holmes Hall 

r the lintel of the agricultural 
building at the Ohio State I'niversity 
appears the name of Norton S. 
Townshend, who during a score of 
his riper years was its first profes- 
sor of agriculture . |<»nathan B. Tur 
net of Illinois, moving spirit two 
generation! ago in the industrial 
education of the Middle West, 
deemed by tome to have inspired 
Senator Morrill to formulate the land- 
grant college act of 186a, i§ honored 
at the State University of Illinois; 
Ezra Cornell of New York, farmer, 
pioneer in establishing equality m 
education, founded a great university 
bated on th> simple platform ; "1 
would found an institution where any 
person can find instruction in any 
subject;'* and the memory of Justin 
S. MorriU of Vermont, farmer, coun- 
try merchant, congressman, senator, 
"grand old man H among the states- 
men of the last years of the nine- 
teenth century, father of the Ameri- 
can land.grant colleges, is enshrined 
in the hearts of every American ag- 
riculturial college, administrator, 
teacher and student, and bis name 
perpetuated in Morrill Hails on many 
a college campus. 

Massachusetts ddes well to imitate 
her sister state* and in this building 



concretely to evidence her indebted- 
ness to Levi Stockbridge. He was 
a man of the people, one of Abraham j 
Lincoln's sort, farmer, teacher, inves- ; 
tigator, shaper of early state policies 
in relation to this institution, its first j 
professor of agriculture, honored and 
beloved by all who were associated 
with him. When only twenty years 
of age he expressed in clear-cut, | 
terse English his belief "that the 
vocation of a farmer is the greatest 
most honorable, as it certainly is the j 
most useful, in which a man can en- j 
gage" and that "it demands as high a 
degree of intelligence and justifies as 
thorough preparation as either of the 
so-called learned professions,'' and 
stated that it would be his "effort and 
hope as a farmer to be successful in 
1 Ins) calling " and "to do something 
' towards advancing the vocation itself 
in practical ways as well as in public 
esteem." "A dedication, a creed, a 
resolution ; finely coneeived, well 
phrased and nobly executed." As 
we look on this the finest and most 
significant of the many line, well 
equipped and appropriately named 
buildings of this splendid institution, 
we can say from our hearts that we 
believe the spirit of Levi Stockbridge ] 
broods over us today and is well 
pleased ; that the inspiration he gave 
in life will be transmitted within these 
walls to unborn generations; that 
while his mortal body lies in North 
Hadle\ churchyard, "his scud goes 
mar* liin^ >m" on this campus now 
and forever. 

Agricultural education in New Kng- 
I land is interesting in the retrospect, 
it is avital force today, and its future 
is promising. IaU us briefly review 
its early days, study its present con- 
dition, and prophesy as to what is to 
come. 

The first American book dealing 
with agriculture, a collection of 
; essays, was published by Rev. Tared 
Eliot in Connecticut from 174710 
(1759, It records experience and 
stresses the need of experimental 
1 work in agriculture. The anonymous 
author oV a treatise on "rural eco- 
nomics** published in 1791 in thej 
speaker's home city in Burlinglon.Vt., j 
writes at length on experimental agri- 
culture, stating that no "amusement 
in the world equals the framing and 
conducting of experiments in agricul- 
ture." This statement evidently was 
made before the day of the "movies." 
Our agricultural school antedated 
those established in other section. 
In the early twenties the Gardiner 
Lyceum in Maine, Hummer Acad- 
emy in Massachusetts, Uerby Semi- 
nary and Trinity College in Connect- 
icut inaugurated agricultural instruc- 
tion work; in the thirties the Farm 
School on Thompson's Island in 
Itoston Harbor, earlier started as an 
orphan asylum pure and simple, trans- 
ferred its beneficent work to this 
island and began after a fashion to 
teach agriculture; schools in Andover, 



Bernardston, Koxbury, Northampton, 
Westfield and elsawhere in Massa- 
chusetts attempted more or less fruit- 
lessly to teach this subject. These 
efforts were Hashes in the pan. None 
of them lasted more than two or three 
years, save the work at the Farm 
School on Thompson's Island, where 
as a matter of fact definite agricultural 
instruction, as the term is now under- 
stood, was not offered until within the 
last quarter of a century. Ill rooted, 
poorly nourished, they were cut down 
by the frosts of hostile criticism, and 
the place that knew them, knew them 
no more for two generatiwns. 

Until recently the scholastic dogma 
obtained that "the important thing in 
education is not the material learned 
but the disciplinary process of learn- 
ing.'' This conception of the func- 
tion of education was crystallized of 
old on the lintel of a mediaeval col- 
lege in the phrase "nothing useful 
taught here." "Culture for culture's 
sake" is still instated upon in classi- 
cal circles. Attempts at agricultural 
teaching failed because the scholas- 
tic atmosphere was chilly, the farmers 
critical and hostile, because no ade- 
quate body of knowledge existed. 
Agriculture was not fashionable; 
comic papers featured hayseeds; 
Aggies were without the college pale; 
book-farming was decried; the trend 
v\.is citywards; economic returns 
were inadequate; and there were 
"none so poor as to do reverence" to 
farming as a vocatfon. All this is 
now changed. Agriculture is the 
vogue; the papers say less about 
hayseeds than about farm aulos; 
Aggies sit in the collegiate Sanctum 
Sanctorum; farmers read bulletins by 
the millions; "back to the land" is 
the cry; there is good money in mod 
ern farming operations, and "tin- 
stone which the builders rejected, 
the same has become the head stone 
of the corner." 

The old time educational order is 
p. i>sing; a different spirit is abroad, 
one which accords to disciplinary 
and to cultural studies their full and 
rightful place in the educational 
policy, but looks upon them not as 
ends in themselves but as means to 
a better end; a spirit which empha- 
sises vocational relationships and 
stresses service. 

A new educational formula has 
been recently expressed in the follow- 
ing simple language: "The way to 
educate a man is to set him to work; 
the way to get him to work is to 
interest him: the way to interest him 
is to vitalize his task by relating it to 
some form of reality." The way to 
educate a school boy along agricul- 
tural lines is to set him at work on 
agricultural problems, in school room, 
field and farm; the way to get him 
thus to work is by exciting his active 
interest in what he is doing; and the 
way to excite that active interest is 
by setting forth by word and deed 
the vital economic relationship his 



training bears to modern farm open 
tions. Studies which seem unrel. 
ted to reality are apt to be vague at, 
meaningless. 

The fundamental reason why th 
old time educational formulas are not 
accepted at face value today is b< 
cause of the growth and possibilities 
of vocational training, which, usin,; 
the definition just cited, relates the 
school boys task to some form of 
reality, thus interesting him to set 
himself at work. And that, speak- 
ing broadly and for most school boy^. 
is just what the stereotyped methods 
of the school rooms have not accom- 
plished; they have not vitalized 
task or interested the student; that 
is just what the earlier attempts at 
agricultural education, modeled ,11 
they were inevitably (for there were 
no other sorts whereby to patten 
after the old school style, could not 
accomplish; they did not relate the 
book farming to real farming, thej 
did not stimulate the mind. And 
that is just what the agricultural edu- 
cation today is accomplishing. b< 
cause it does stand for work, practi- 
cal work, scientific work, interesting 
work, rural work. It has succeeded 
where the earlier attempts have failed, 
because, in short agricultural edu< 
tion is growing up and has begun 
ic .ilize some of its possibilities. 

It is a helpful sort of teachii 
this teaching of agriculture, tln^ 
direct, forceful, vocational study. It 
is a sort of teaching which serves 
more effectually than hitherto 
bring the boy into appreciative rela- 
tionship with Ins surroundings: t<» 
inspire him with a love for the bosAc 
farm because of his better under- 
standing of the principles of its oj 
ation; to lighten its drudgery by tell 
ing him the study of the soil and the 
crop: to widen his opportunity^ 
thereon in after life by substituting 
knowledge of fundamental principles 
for the routine of empiriciasm. Not a 
new twist to education, not a tenij" 
ary fad, not an added burden i" 
an already overcrowded curriculum 
but a new point of view, a re 
rected effort, a substitution in 
some cases of vital, environmental 
subjects for dead wood or frills, mat 
ter fairly well shaped into pedag of 
cal form: matter having cultural U 
well as agricultural value in teach C 
a movement pregnant with g 
promise of economic and educate I 
advancement. 

\griculture is distinctly, prima 
frankly a vocational subject; y*' 
may be so taught as to afford iti 
students wider horizons, broider 
sympathies, wiser heads, kin 
hearts. 

Successful elementary school wof* 
in agriculture began to take shai *« 
the 1900*8 came in. Several 
ago its introduction into rural school 
curricula was required by 1 
southern and some western st i 
and now in a large share of the i** 



ormal schools, summer schools and 
1 cher training classes in high 
hools and academies are training 
Ring women to teach elementary 
u ure study and agriculture in the 
ne room rural schools and in consul 
i ated schools. This movement is 
ure to extend the country over. It 
s to be hoped it will not extend 
iore rapidly than the production of 
properly trained teachers will war- 
rant. Its purpose is to inspire and 
to educate, information being a byp- 
roduct, to create a new atmosphere, 
offer a broader outlook, to develop 
1 correet perspective, to teach from 
ihe point of view of the country rath- 
1 r than from that of the city, to open 
1 hildish eyes and minds to the op- 
portunities for life afforded in the 
open country, and to shield them 
fiom the glamor, glitter and glare of 
ity lights. 

The first successful American agri- 
1 ultural secondary school is now 
seventeen years old, and is located 
at the University of Minnesota. 

There are two distinct tvpes of 
nidary schools in whiehagriiui- 
' ne 1^ taught : 

' The vocational s( bool with ag- 
in ulture and sometimes domestic 
Si ience and manual training as the 
nucleus — the excuse for existence — 
other studies being grouped around 
oirelated to these subjects. The 
mitfa Agricultural School at North 
mipton is of this type. 

h. The high school or academy 
here agriculture is taught as such, 
usl IJ is mathematics or Knglish, or 
in which there is an agricultural 
course parallel with such courses as 
the college preparatory English or 
•mmercial courses, Hopkins Acad- 
emy in Hadley is of this sort. 

K.uh type is advantaged and dis 

"ivantaged. In favor of the special 

ational school it may be said that 

i' is positive, aggressive, frankly vo- 

■ ational, has succeeded in many 

-s, sends its graduates back to 

the farms, thus proving that the 

u iiool's atmosphere is pure. It ap- 

l«als to the farmers, attracts boys 

who would not go to the ordinary 

h^h school, enables its teachers to 

do local extension work and become 

agricultural leaders, and serves, as 

well been said, to break down 

prejudices, to set new and inde* 

lent educational standards, to 

• use enthusiasm, and to develop 
&u cessful ways and means of teach- 
in/ the common affairs of life. 

Dean Davenport of Illinois, a deep 

" iker, cogent reasooer and warm 

nd of agricultural education in the 

s lifBOH schools, says the special 

• ools are apt to raise barriers be- 
" <-n agricultural and other interests 

te a better mutual understanding 
■sirable, that they tend to accent- 
class distinctions, to impede the 
na iral flow of men ftom one profes- 
s| i to another, to draw students 

• v from home at too early an age 



or else to limit their service to re- 
stricted areas, to check the develop- 
ment, of existing high schools, to 
exhibit the expansion of the high 
school system into rural communities, 
and to tend to discourage the introduc- 
tion of agriculture into the the regular 
high school curriculum, where, in his 
judgment, it can be as well taught as 
in the special schools. He believed 
that the high schools in which agri- 
culture is taught on a parity with 
other studies tend to make farmers 
men, whereas the vocational schools, 
segregating their students in a group 
unrelated to other students whose 
courses are more humanistic in char- 
acter, tend to make men farmers. 
He urges that this distinction is not 
merely one of words, but is an actu- 
ality. 

Dr. Bailey, the former Dean of Cor- 
nell's College of Agriculture, holds 
with Dean Davenport as to the proper 
philosophy of this educational move- 
ment. He declares it to be " a very 
important pedagogical principle that 
agricultural education should not of 
right be separated from all other edu 
cational efforts ; that "education by 
means of agriculture is but one phase 
of education in general " that the 
danger is that in the isolation of these 
institutions we may isolate their edu- 
cational program." He intimates the 
temporary vogue of the separate 
school and declares that the problem's 
final solution lies not in organization 
of special detached schools but in the 
re-directing of existing public schools 
in such away that thej ^hall teach the 

members of their communities how to 

live." 

For the consolidated high school, 
upon the curriculum of which indus- 
trial studies are engrafted, there may 
be advanced the arguments of 

i. Economy of construction and 
running expenses 

2. The inspiration due to contact 
with students and teachers in other 
courses. 

3. The sense of unity instead of 
separateness, 

4. Often, but not always, better 
teachers and equipment. 

But against it may be urged : 

1. The diversified aim and conse- 
quently less direct purpose. 

2. \ possible lack of close touch 
with the farming constituency. 

Every educational advance has had 
to fight its way to recognition. With- 
in the memory of men now living, 
science students in college were held 
to be outside the pale and were not 
admitted to chapel exercises. For 
generations high school education 
was confined to classical studies and 
had little direct bearing upon useful 
life service in the fundamental indus- 
tries. Manual training fought for Us 
life twenty years ago and won j aud 
for two decades, education for city 
hands in preparation for life work has 
been recognized. Now the farmer, 
who constitutes a half of our popula- 
tion, is being similarly trained in his 



CAMPION 



Fine 



Tailoring 



COLLEGE OUTFITTER 



Ready-To-Wear Clothes 



For the Game and Informal this Sattinlay — Drop .trouiul lo No. 4 
South College. It m;t\ be worth your time. 

Woom.i:v to. Agent. 



F. A. SHERARD 

ME N'S STO RE 

Use Our New Cash Discount Card and Save Five Per Cent 

IIS 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 

Come to us for — — 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Dtensiis 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



FREE 



FREE 



For a few <la\ i only here's your chance to ^et 

FREE 

Willi 1 i>oc Humidor of Tuxedo Tobacco. 
(iiCNUJNE FRENCH BRIAR 

PIPE 

SEE THEM IN TIUC WINDOW 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Resell Store— (Jn ihe Cornir. 



IO 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 2, 1915- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 2, 1915. 



ti 



J. GircSBURO 

II l-a Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

AMNOONt INI. 

75C Special Half Sole, Rubber 75c 

WI.I'AIIVIN". 

Black, Tan, White Work Guaranteed. 

Rubber Sobs . 
Rubber Soles, with Heels 
Solei Sewed, • 

M shin.h for »i.imi 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Willianis Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours; 9 to iz a. m„ 130 to 5 v. m. 



MH.r.o 
•l.ia 

7Sc 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone »—R 

GAP FITTING, TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 

Windows, Lead Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS. 




Established 1904 



I. M. LABROVITZ 



FINE 



Merchant Tailor 

and GENTS' FURNISHINGS 



We will call anil deliver clothes 



Dyeing, Altering, Cleaning and Pressing 

Fill Dress Silts to Rent and Dress Supplies 



1 1 AMITY ST., 
AMHERST, - - - MASS. 



Telephone :«02-W. 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 

the mom economical you can BSC 

Better CRUrb 

^£*XLLiIl**|o<£ ,,re the inevitable ro-ult 

THE ROGERS * HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

Office and W»rk«, l*»rlt*ii«t, C«ri». 




Huntington Ave., Exeter and Hla K den Sti., Beaton, Maas. 
Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 



AMOS H. WHIPPLE, phop 



Carptrvter & Morehouse 

PRINTERS, 



No, 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Maa*. 



calling. Than this, there is no more 
important, no more pressing educa- 
tional problem. The National Asso- 
ciation is thoroughly committed to the 
movement. Secondary education in 
and by agriculture is coining to its 
own today, because it fills a need and 
fills it worthily. 

Nearly ten years ago Slate Super- 
intendent Morrison set forth the rural 
problem in the following language; 
" During the first three-quarters of 
the nineteenth century every group of 
three or four towns had its academy, 
usually an endowed Institution. Out 
of these academies went a steady 
stream of sons and daughters who 
were, other things being equal, always 
the strongest of the generation, for 
otherwise they would not have gained 
this education. Seldom did the) 
settle upon ihe old farm or in the 
home town. Their education had I 
fitted them for other thing* They 
became lawyers or physicians or 
clergymen or schoolmasters or busi 
ness men in the cities, and the girls 
went with them prevailingly 10 he 
their wives. Their children grew up 
under city conditions and went 10 
citv schools. The unambitious, the 
dull, the unfoilunate boys and girls 
of the old countryside, who could not 
get to the academy, as a class re- 
mained behind and became the domi- 
nant stock. And they reproduced 
their kind for another generation. 
upon whom the same sorting process 
was carried out. Then the factory 
system seized upon the strong limbed 
and restless, albeit slow wilted, and 
began to sort them out and remove 
ili. in. finally the Civil War came 



abandoned school house." 

Agricultural instruction in Ni 
England secondary schools is increa 
ingly practical. In Massachusett •-, 
all day, part time and evening pups 
are taught, residents or non-resident 
Home projects, school projects, far> 
accounting, written reports, are n 
quired. Local and state supervisx- . 
are exercised. Advisory committees 
of farmers are created, made up f 
successful practitioners, who const 
with and advise the local school 
ficials. Co-operation obtains be 
tween agricultural instructors ami 
various agencies for the improve- 
ment of farm production and ni 
agement. Conferences are held, 
collaboration effected, judging con- 
tests established, agricultural clubs 
started, extension schools attend.- 
divers forms of agricultural extension 
activities enlisted and many projects 
! for home or school work have net 
i put in operation. 

Hoys with these home project-, 
their agricultural teaching thus put 
into practice, are taught in the school 
room and by experience to think, to 
reason, to judge, to work, to kei | 
accurate accounts: the boys in these 
New Kngland schools, in the thous- 
ands of schools all over this broad 
land, are living exponents of the new 
educational formula voiced earU in 
this address; they are being edu 
I ,,ted by being set to work, lot J 
work because they are interested 
In sin h vitalization of their task ..-. 
relates it to reality. They are l>< 
trained to play well I heir parti 
coming years .is farmers and tin/ 



sixty years 



Nfasaachu* 



Now is the turn- l" be planning tor 

FraternityGroups 

Have ihem ,aken at — — 

miss McClelland studio 

44 State S..«t. • • Nortta-plon. Mm. 




Vif.w From Kast. 



and struck down the idealists by the 
wholesale, mostly boys or young men 



grew 80 per cent of her food 
todav she grows but 8 per cefl I 



proportion of 



Knuland 



New 
under cultivation is less today th 
was before the Civil War. 



who had not yet reproduced them- 
selves in a new generation." He 

! then paints a pathetic word picture *»« „,.,«.» ...- 

lot the abandoned homes and says manufactuiing industries are dr 
that the "race allowed us sons and [closer to the source of raw mat- 
daughters to be educated away from I the primacy of Brockton and I 

I the farm and the conntry, and the 1 threatened, for the center 

I state. In their place today we too 

I often have a dwindling town, a ne 
glected farm, a closed church, an 



national shoe industry 
west of Pittsburg, Pa. 
these facts significant ? 



is 



i pe of education worth while which 
t nds effectually to vitalize New 
I ugland agriculture ? Is it not evi- 
1. nt that agricultural instruction in 

r public schools is needed, is here 
t stay, is, in the vernacular, "mak- 
ing good ? " Only a fraction at best 
New England's youth can go to 

.lle^e, come be taught in Holmes 
Hall, Morrill Hall or Stockbridge 
Hall; but from such buildings Hows 

fructifying stream of youth to man 

■se secondary schools, an impetus 
to the whole countryside, to scholars 
ind parents, within and without its 
school rooms. 

I have said nothing as yet as to 
. >wth and possibilities in the col- 
lege world ; nor do J mean to say 

ire than a word. Within fifteen 

us the number of New England's 

* e* 

: ir-year course agricultural students 
has quadrupled ; the incomes, ex- 
|h nditures, faculties, courses, equip- 
ments of the colleges have in some 
sure kept pace with this increase ; 
their undergraduate work is on a 
distinctly higher plane than of old , 
their graduate courses are diverse, 
dignified and difficult : their gradu 
- are succeeding and reflecting 
credit upon their alma maters ; their 
r.search work measures with the 
and their extension activities 
sit most helpful and stimulating, 
I he colleges are growing ; their pes* 
nihilities are limitless. 

The American Agricultural col 

» are close to the people, 

Hence, better than any other agency, 

tliey can shape and solve the 

il problem, determine the welfare 

'lie rural school, help to make the 

n country a better plan- m which 

vr, and enhance its social, phys 

and material wellbeing. They 

■• set themselves at the task of 

improving agricultural practice ; of 

t.rmging about improved commercial 

inds and developing a higher 

- of citizenship among American 

farmers ; and they expect to achieve 

th»»r end through the education of 

the boys and girls of today in college 

halls, in the vocational schools ami 

schools and through their ex- 

'>n systems. If they measure 

•p to their responsibilities, they will 

mpUsh'a work greater than that 

iken by* any class of American 

onal institutions. May their 

sir.itive, instructional, research 

xtension staffs, now and always, 

<* i 1 imbued with the spirit of ser- 

that in the hereafter they may 

the Master's "Well done.' 



Y. M. C. A. 

. NOTES 



The course of Bible study lectures, 
of which further detinite announce- 
ment will be made later, will not be 
started before the close of the football 
season. The meeting Thursday even- 
ing will take the form of a regu- 
lar association devotional meeting. 
President Butterfleld will give a 
twenty-minute talk on a subject of his 
own choice which will doubtless be of 
interest to all. No one should miss 
this opportunity of hearing "T'rexy." 

The regular meeting of the meoclll 
tion will be omitted on Nov. 11 
because of the series of mass meet- 
ing preparatory to the Springfield 
game. 

Hereafter all announcementa ami 
articles pertaining to Association 
work will appear under the heading, 
"Y, M, 0. A. Notes." 



ROTICI 

\ men desiring to compete for 

tit manager of track should 

n their names to Dean Richer 

Rogers M 7 and Flint *17 at 

All competitors shall be from 

reeilttsa class. Owlng^ to the 

Imt the managership of track 

en changed from a Senior to a 

■fuin , office. 



ORGAN RECITAL 

Students of Aggie were treated to 
a rare musical recital, Friday evening 
when Professor William C. Hammond 
of Mount Holyoke college gave sev- 
eral selections upon the new organ in 
Stockbridge Hall. He was ably 
assisted by Miss Ida Cbadwiek, iu- 
stmctor of the violin at Mount Hol- 
yoke college. The recital was in cel- 
ebration of the ui.licaliou of Ktock- 
bridge Hall, which took place in the 
afternoon. No more fitting 1 pro- 
gram could have l>een arranged than 
that of the evening. Professor Ham- 
mond is known throughout the coun- 
try as an organist of great repute. 
His interpretation of the acverul 
selections Friday was certainly in 
keeping with bis reputation. Miss 
Chadwick's violin selections were 
likewise most pleasing to the large 
audience, especially her rendering of 
Beethoven's "minuet." 



I'RtM.lt \\l. 

1. Overture in i» Mai..i Handel 

., ) al leg re tto clink 

1 Spring N«ng iiMii.rotike 
Mr, Hammond. 

S, March in A Minor <»rleg 
S, Violin JSohm 

c banana and Parana l<oupsrln-Krels!er 

\ tiiliinlim. Mi 1 1 mi Knislit 

" l.ietM.«pi.tiii ■' k rentier 

Mi** chadwiric. 
.">. TiMiatii ami KiijfUP in H Minor Hack 
\ \oci inn.' I' - ! \ linger 

) Allegro Vivo. ITKvn 

Mr. Hammond 

Violin Snil.w 

\ •• Nsrhtsehc Bags nohm 

1 Minuet Baeffcovw 

MUh Iliad* 

ilatermeiWMi BJiet 

' aprtee Knblnateia 

», Offertotre batiste 

Mi. Hammond. 



'. 



*'J.'i.— In a recent Bureau of Rnte- 
mology Bulletin, "The Coloaoma 
Beetle in New Kngland," A. F. Bur* 
gess covers the work of the beetle in 
the control work of the < *ypay and 
Brown Tail pest in the New England 
states, 



GOME OVER 
LET'S GET 

ACQUAINTED 




We are ready to show you everything that the college man 

needs for comfort in the way of clothes. Here are a few 

of our many offerings, and remember they are in 

every ease the best of their kind. 

Hart Schaff ner & Marx Beady Clothes 

In just the styles you're looking for— Four other good makes. 

MACKINAWS FROM $5 UP 

See the famous Patrick line before um gel yours. 
We'll save you money. 

The Oakes Sweater is the best made at any price. 
the: prices are from $s to *t 

Absolutely pure wool and made to wear. 
COMPLETE LINES OF SOFT HATS AND CAPS IN THE UTEST SHAPES AND COLORINGS 



Hxclusive Custom Tailoring at Pair Prices 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



fZ 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1 QC7 THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD 1Q1P 
lOO/ FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS lJlO 

Your Opportunity 

Tim editor of one of our leading agricul- 
tural papers writes us under date of January 
12th, 1915, a* follows :- 

"I am doing all I can to induce farmers to 
plant gram crops this year. 

"Gram is very high and it is going higher. 
Wheat is going to $2.00 per bushel and other 
grains will share in the advance. Wheat cents 
$2.50 per 1 00 pounds now, and pound for 
pound oats cost as much, 

"It Kerns to me that the eastern farmer's 
salvation is to buy plant food and grow 

CORN, WHEAT, BARLEY, 

OATS AND BUCKWHEAT 

"Last fall I doubled my acreage of winter 
wheat and thus spring I shall triple the acreage 
of oats. 1 managed to produce 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre, and sold the straw at 
$ I 7.00 per ton in the barn ." 

THE OPPORTUNITY IS YOURS ! 
Be rare that yen buy 

EL Frank Coe Fertilizers 

They are available plant foods that more than meet the most 
exacting requirements, giving plump, sound, full heads of grab and vigor- 
ous, healthy straw. 

Eastern users of E. Frank Coe Fertilizers are raising 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre. The average for the United States for three years 
is I 4 iVi bushels to the acre, 

THE OPPORTUNITY IS YOURS f WILL YOU MAtt THE MOST OP FT ? 

The Coe-Mortimf.r Company, §1 Chambers St, N. Y. 



>i 



^ 




ia 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 2, i^- 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

N11W lucatetl over post oltice. Up ""«• Night 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket -System lei. 36-M 

T. MIENTKA. 

SHOE STORK 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday from 7.12. On your way to f. O. 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner ol Hillman and Uarnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is » modern hos- 
telry run on the European Plan. It is just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices •■ and up; rooms 
with bath (single) 9X.HO and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and wel! ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory-every 
thing of the highest quality, well cookeil and 
nerved in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



1 

The Massachusetts Agricultural Colto 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science- 

A student may specialize in the following subjects : 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swans 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six down pens to select ft 

OUR RULE 

"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



Highland n.»i. 1 



*|M iliKliilil, *!»*». 



STUDEHTFIHWITDIIE 1 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

E. D. MARSH ESTATE 

COX SONS 

— AND — 

VINING 

71-74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

w 1 si 1 ■'■ BOOK AOBMTH. 
Both sexes, fat be»t seller published. Particular-, 

and outfit free, 
OM, W. HOMKKS. 1-8, St. Awgu«tln... H«- 

COLLEGE SHOES 




Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on lutercollogiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'.d Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association. 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index. 

M. A. C Christian Association, 

Fraternity Conference. 

Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
S. W. Hall, Piesident 
C. W. Moses, Manager 
A. W, Spaulding, Mauager 
I). A. Ricker, Manager 
Huntington, Jr., Mauager 
Moorhouse, Mauager 
H. Aiken, President 
J. T. Nicholson, Manager 
F. A. Anderson, Mauager 
L. E. Fielding, Manager 
F. VV. Mayo, Manager 

A. J. Hicks, President 
C. H. (iould, President 

B. F. Taber, President 



We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 

MODERN REPAIR OEPT. 

B.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave AOOIE COLLEGE lor MOL- 
YOKE at IS »l«. past tlie hour. 



CARS 



I here are seven Oood Reisons why vomhould 



buy your 



COAL 



or 



WOODWARD'! 
LUNCH 

97 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

CUnd mly frm* I A. M. a* 4 *■ M 

RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton, M«MM*IM«tt» 

rwo morns mow nif of.pot 

The hotel where there ii comfort (with 

out extravagance,) More popular 

than ever. 

Special LmikJmnhi U-J P. M. 

PRIVATE DININC ROOMS 
A la Carte Service 
r-row S-JO M II P.M. 



C. R. ELDER 

Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Ml., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls, 

SO Mite* of Trackage -nodern 
Equipment train Dispatch- 
ing System Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



Leave AMHERST lor AOOIE COL- 
LEOE at 7 and 37 mln. past the hour. 

htat 



AMHERST t SUNDERLAND ST. BY. CO 



ClfM-Ing Prr»»l»* marine 
Quicker serrlw, Um»t W«rh,Low«l PTi» 
All woik carefully done, Wort «>W 'f *f 
felivared. Gerrt*» owceati, witi,, p»n«- * na 
eoftU. Ladies' hne linen »uitt»»p«cialtv 
^Tearn. will call «wrj day alM. A < 

WM. FRANKI-I-V It 
Rear Na»h Bl'k, Amher»t. Tel K» J*»^ 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

JNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer raent. The uni- 
form worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

JACOB REED'S SONS, 



Makers or H OoW Midal Uniforms 



1404-1426 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Che.tnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

.....Diamond Merchants.- 

PMIi.ilpkl.'s Official Fratifiltf Jew eHr 

SPECIALISTS HI 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, No «!«*» 
Rings, Charms ...... Prises, *wj*J* 

Medals ...... College Ptas, Fobs, •*** 

Rings, Charms 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



\'oi.. XXVI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 9, 1915. 



No. 8 



VARSITY WALKS AWAY WITH 
MIDDLEBURY AND WINS 25-0 

With Five Regulars Out of Line-up, 

Aggie Keeps Vermont Team in 

Hand Throughout Game. 

Saturday, tin* Massachusetts Agii- 

• •iiltural College football learn wou 
an easy victory over Middlebury on 
Alumni Field with a score of M to (). 
the visitors seemed doomed to de- 
feat after the first few minute-, of 
play, when after recovering the 
kickoff, Murphy sent Boles crashing 
tlirougli the center of the line for | 
touchdown. The Maroon and White, 
however, were given a surprise with 
tlie next play, when Middlebury re- 
turned the kickorT at) yards, and 
cans within striking distance of the 
goal. This play was probably the 
decisive one of the game, for the 
Aggie Inns then realized that their 
opponents were out to win and would 
light till the last minute. The Aggie 
it-tf dxi- stiffened and the ball 

• liitugt.nl Lands. 

The Maroon and Wliite then 
itarted mm irreaistnble march down 
the field which resulted in a touch- 
ilown. Murphy, at quarterback, sent 
holes, ( rraysiiu and Nailing repeat- 
•dly through the line for long gains 
of 10 to 80 yards. Darling was 
easily the star of the game, his long 
spectacular end runs resulting in two 
more touchdowns in the second half. 
Another bright feature of the game 
was the playing of the substitutes, 
<o» Captain Curran, Palmer, Weeks, 
Dunn and Danforth were allowed to 
lestap prior to the big game against 
Springfield. 

In the last period, with ten sub- 
- itiites playing for Aggie. Middle- 
•»ary carried the ball to Aggie's 23 
J trd Hue, but time came to the rescue 

I the opponents failed to score. 
I kt weri was the leading light of the 

■« i tors' ten m. Ins remaikable speed 
Mid good choice of plays making 
h m a valuable plavci 

First PrKion 

Middlebury won the toss and chose 

• feud the goal with the wind at 

their backs, Gray son kicked off 

1 Aggie recovered the ball. Dai I 

made five yards through tackle 

I Boles tore through guard fur 

* eu yards and first down. Gray- 

* n added two yards around end, 
> 1 Middlebury was penalized five 

Is for offside. Holes gained four 



TEAM WORK HELPS WIN CROSS EVERY RIGHT IMPLIES AGGIE TEAM WORKING FOR 

COUNTRY AT SPRINGFIELD A CORRESPONDING DUTY VICTORY AT SPRINGFIELD 



Final Score Stands 24-32. Aiken 

and Richards First to 

Finish. 

As a prophecy of what may occur 
in football next Saturday, the cross- 
country team won a victory over 
Springfield Y. M.C. A. last Saturday 
by l score of 24 to '.i'2. doing over 
a typical cross-country course of 4.5 
miles, Aiken and Richards finished 
together in the fast time of 2 I min- 
utes. .'!7 2--> seconds, with a strong 
lead over Cobb, former captain of 
Amherst track, their opponent's first 
man. The men kept well bunched 
throughout the race. A Springfield 
man started in the lead, then the 
whole Aggie team followed together 
until the return was begun when Uieh- 
ards and Aiken jumped to the front, 
where they remained to the finish. 
Kitleredge and Cate, of the other 
team, closed up ami passed the n-t 
ol ilie .M A. v . runners, »-„| ,, 
sell tried to keep up with them but 
was finally shaken off. 

The only real sensation of the race 
was raneed when Lyons ami Clover 
raced down the track lo the finish with 
only a few feet separating them. 

The men finished in the following 
older: Richards and Aiken tied for 
first; third, Cobb of Springfield ; 
fourth. Kittredge of Springfield ; fifth, 
Catr of Springfield ; sixth. Lyons of 
M. A. C. ; seventh. Clover of M. A. 
(.: eighth. ftlMMll of M. A. C. | 
ninth. Anger of Springfield ; tenth. 
Babbitt of M. A. C. : and eleventh. 

Jones <.f spi mgfield. 



Hememher the reunion at 
the Highland after the Springfield 
game. 



Says Professor Taft in Giving Sound 

Advice to Students at First 

Sunday Chapel. 

For the first regular Sunday elm pel 
service last Sunday, the students heard 
Kx-1'resident WWkm H. Taft, who 
spoke on ^Civilization and the 
Church." The gallery of the audito- 
rium was filled to standing with 
people, some of whom had evidently 
come a long way to hear the noted 
speaker. 

Professor Taft in bis introduction 
remarked upon the extensive educa- 
tion now offered to the prospective 
farmer. He said "When I think 
what the modern farmer has to know, 
I'm rather glad that I went into law." 

"If we who have had schooling in 
this great world could only get what 
we know under the skins of our young 
men, how fortunate you would be, 
but I suppose it can only get there 
l,i ' • ' • ' * i I ,f i 

1 with to warn you particularly to he 
careful in respect to the point of view 
that yon bold, in regard to your 
country and its grest institutions. 
lie grateful to Cod for our eounti v 
and its people. I want to preach a 
necessity for gratitude that shall 
grow into a strong patriotic feeling. 
"It seems to be the style to criti- 
cize popular government. We ought 
to study the past, liowevei. and see 
how much better off we are than those 
who went before us. We should 
make reason the basis for our patri- 
otism. I'm not asking you to oppose 
reform, but do justice to what has 
been accomplished in the past. Co 
back WOO years, see what liberty was 
then enjoyed, and then realise the 

1 1 fitiitnitMl *ifi |«ur "il 



FICI'IIKS FOR COMPARISON 



l>ay, re 
Danforth, rl 

Dunn, rg 
Perry, < 
.Ionian, Ig 
I'laiwled, It 
(irnyson, le 
Palmer, qb 
f Curran, Ihb 
Darling, rhb 
Weeks, fb 

Average, 



*i tSSAniCMETTO. 

v, Mgrn 

i H 
17.. 
1 68 



IHfi 
170 
IMS 

xm 

170 
172 
lfiO 
170 



iiHiita. 
.*i.07 
G.00 

\ Hi 

:,.ni 
B.tO 
%M 
%m 

6,00 

•».io 

fl.WJ 



170 



uo 



Kindle, le 
Stlne. It 
Long. Ig 
Mat \ ill. c 
Purdy, rg 
( Jieim. it 
Mitterling. re 
Miller, qb 
Sermon, Ittb 
Kvans, rhb 
Cooper, fb 

Average. 



rtw.UK 

177 
160 

l«4 
199 
17.. 
15fi 
150 
14fl 
163 
180 



l|.)tf»H. 

i.Of 
.•10 
5.07 

a.n 

5.11 

i*..«)l 
5.08 
5.07 

a,09 

O.Ot 
5.10 



166 10-11 



5.09 



Prospects Never Brighter for Win 

Over Old Rivals This Saturday. 

Condition of Players Better. 



PREVIOUS SCORES OF 


AGGIE SPRINGFELD GAMES 


1003 


Aggie 12, Springfield 


1904 


Aggie 11, Springfield 


1906 


Aggie 16, Springfield 


1906 


Aggie 21, Springfield 


1907 


Aggie 6, Springtiefd 


1908 


Aggie 6, Springfield 6 


1909 


Springfield 18, Aggie 6 


1910 


Springfield 16, Aggie 3 


1911 


Springfield 19, Aggie 3 


1913 


Springfield 41, Aggie 


1913 


8pringfield 14, Aggie 


1914 


Springfield 17, Aggie 3 



'•Now then Spriiiglield" will bt the 
rallying cry of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College for the coming 
week, for on Saturday will take place 
the annual football game between 
M. A. C. and Springlield V. M.C, \ 
College on I'ralL lielil, Sprtngtield 
It is a long time siuce an Aggie 
team bus taken the measure of the 
t. M. C. A. Ikjvs but if tlu n ev. t 
was a time when the prospects of 
victory weie bright it is tbi* year. 
Never in the memory of the oldest 
alumnus has there been such a well 
balsnced team representing M A < . 
aa the eleven that is under the abb- 
guidance of Captain Hurry Curran. 
Coach Hrides has not yet turned out 
a team since he has been here th:.t 
can in any wav compare with the 
1913 aggregation. 

Springfield also baa a good team 
Cast Saturday ihcy defeated Amhcr-t 
by tbe score of 20 to 7 and Yale won 
from them only by a narrow margin. 
Holy Cross bowed to the prowess of 
Sermon, the speedy Springfield back, 
in a 7-0 game and other teams have 
Found them a hard proj>osition. 
Opposed to that is Aggies' 7-0 defeat 
at the hands of Harvard, a 7-7 tie 
with Holy CroMs and ■ I -I- 1 1 tie with 
the speedy Tufts team. On paper 
tbe teams appear to be pretty evenly 
matched. 

While the Aggie line is n strong 
factor <<n the team the Springfield 
line is very weak. Amherat'sllghi 
forwards bent the Springfield for- 
ward lino doabln. For her running 
attack, Springfield relies on her 
•peedy end runs that are often used 
as a mask for a forward pass forma - 
ti M. It Is in this department ..f tin 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 9, 1915. 



game that McCurdy'd pupilb are \nu- 
ticularly adept. It whs this form of 
attucktbat won from Amherst as the 
Purple team could not seem to fathom 




Captain Cooper, Springfield. 

the speedy throws of Sermon. Ilou- 
i\ii ifter I In' .schooling that the 
received at Tufts and 



1 • : 1 11 1 



Aggie t 

after ■ wcik against the senilis there 
is no doubt hut what touch Ihidis 
will work up a system of defence 
against this dangerous play. 

l-'ive of the varsity \\<iv kepi out 
of the Middlftiuiy ganu- that they 
might be in the bee! of shape for the 
coining test and it look now as if the 
M. A. C eleven woidd enter the 
.Springfield game with a lineup un- 
we.tkened hy injuries. "Now then, 
Springfield." 



MIDDLEBURY DEFEATED 

[CfliiiuiuiMi from fjsg«« ll 



more yards through center aed Mid- 
dlebury wm* again penalised for off- 
side. Boles cajried the ball over for 
a touchdown but Gray ton failed to 
kick the goal. Score 6 to 0. 

Grayson kicked off. and Middle- 
burj returned the hall ."><> yard*. 
The visitors advanced the ball four 
\ tids through tackle but failed to 
gala on the next three plays and !t 
was Aggie's ball on her own 40 yard 
line. Four line plunge* failed to go 
the required dislanec and again the 
ball changed hand*. Plaisted 
■topped the next play for no gain, 
but a delayed past netted sis yards. 
Day broke up an attempted foiward 
pas* for a 18 yard lois, and Mid- 
dle bury tried a drop kick which 
failed, the ball going to Aggie on 
her 10 yard line. 

Grayson made seven yards through 
tackle, and Rote backed the line for 
12 more and Aral down. Darling 



slid off skin tackle for eight yards 
and the period was up. 

Sm'iiM) Pekiod 
Darling broke away for 80 yards 
around end on a fake and then made 
IS more through skin tackle. Boles 
crashed through center for five yards 
and Middlebury was penalized five 
I'oi offside. BoleB netted two yards 
but the Maroon and White was pen- 
alized on the next play for offside. 
Boles carried the ball over for the 
second touchdown and Grayson 
kicked the goal. Score 13 to 0. 

On the kiekoff, Aggie was on the 
offside, and the ball was placed five 
yards hack. Grayson kicked off, 
Keefe returning the hall 10 yards. 
After failing to gain on two trials 
through the line, Bowers went 
around end for la yards and first 
down. Aggie held on the next four 
downs and the ball changed hands. 
Grayson made 15 yards through 
tackle aud Darling added eight more 
around end. Time was up. 
SboOKD Half 
Boles received the kiekoff and re- 
turned the ball 20 yards. Darling 
advaiucd the ball 15 yards around 
end but Grayson failed to gain on 
the next two plays. Au attempted 
forward pass failed and Grayson 
pouted. Boles returned the ball 16 
vanls before he was brought down. 
1'laisted broke through and tackled 
Keefe for a loss. A line plunge 
netted four J arils but the next play 
failed to gain and Middlebury punted 
to Muiphy. The visitors were pen- 
alized 15 yards for holding on the 
next play. Murphy went through 
center for eight yards, Grayson 
added 10 yards on a skin tackle play 
and Boles six yards on a delayed 
pass. Dai ling circled right end for 
■>:> vards and Murphv went through 
center for a touchdown. Graysou 
kicked the goal. Score 20 to 0. 

Grayson kicked off to Keefe who 
returned the ball 12 yards. Mid- 
dlebury netted six yards on a line 
plunge, but the next two slave went 
for ]■ 

Fourth Pnaoo 
Murphy returned the punt II 
yards. Darling gained nine yards 
around end, Grayson added eight 
more off tackle and Darling repeated 
with eight more. Boles made it first 



a march down the field. Bowers 
made 23 yards around end and on a 
line plunge Pollard made three more 
Keefe made five yards through right 
guard, and Pollard circled end for 12 
yards. This rally, however* was 
stopped short as time was up. 
Lineup and score : 

M \->, \i.Kl. < ol.l.M.I. MIOKI.IiUlJiY 

.s. K. U'h-harilsoii. le re, liutli-r. < 'urran 

Plaiated, Capon, li 

n. Outran, B. Ueinaxe 

Spauldtng, lg '-■ Hoaford 

Perry, liuliriek, <• o, Hawks 

Jordan, buck, rg Iff, Hard 

Holmes, it It.Myriek 

Hay, lietay, re le, Good 

Murphy, <|l» u 1 '. bowers 

Grayson, Rorstruin, Ihb rhb, J. Laraare 

Darling, tbb Ihb, Pollard 

Holes, Dillon, fb fb, Keefe 

Seme Mass, Aggie 86, Sflddleburj u. 
Touchdown*- Boles 2, Murphy, Darling. 
QosJ from touchdown Gray son. Lines- 
man— Kennedy. Referee Johnson "t 
Springfield. Umpire rlubbardol Am- 
herst. Time — four lU-niinitte period*. 



lown through guard, and Darling 
again broke loose, this time for ifl 
yaids. After Grayaon advanced 
the hall three yards, Darling waa 
called upon again. He carried the hall 
over for a touchdown after a spec- 
tacular 25 yard run. No goal. Score 
26 to o. 

Middlebury returned the kiekoff 
10 yards. Three line plunges only 
netted one yard and Keefe punted to 
Murphy who advanced the ball 80 
yards. The Maroon and White 
varsity waa now replaced by sub- 
stitutes, Dnriing ami Gray son being 
the only regulars left. Rostrum 
made four yards but Middlebury in- 
tercepted a forward pass and itarted 



PROFESSOR TAFT TALKS 

[< out iiiii<-< I from page i| 

instruments of liberty given by our 
present government. 

♦Tt is said that there is nothing 
new under the sun. They say that 
ancient civilization and ideals were 
as good as at present. They say 
that we haven't made any advance. 
"What is the great advancement 
that we have made? It is toward 
popular government and the spread 
of OOmfCfl and education. Don't 
expect to wake up some morning to 
millennium. That which is perma- 
nent comes imperceptibly. You may 
not know that yon are advancing or 
that the country is improving, but 
looking back a generation, or even a 
vear, and von will see that it is ris- 
ing steadily— all from intelligent 
effort. 

"We are struggling toward equal- 
ity of condition fend of man. Ine- 
quality of condition is necessary to 
work and construction ami is a stimu- 
lation for advancement. 

'•You young men are now going 
through the youthful disease of satis- 
fying skepticism. It isn't danger- 
ous generally because you live to get 
over it. I agree that men can live, 
be good citizens, and be infidels, but 
they are exceptions. Religion and 
morality are essential to each other 
as a general rule, and the spirit 
of religion energises the moral in- 
clinations and promote! all that is 
necessary for popular government to 
be a success, 

**We hear much about our rights 
and little aboot our duly. You don't 
have a right that doesn't involve a 
corresponding duty, and it is more 
important for you to perform your 
duly than get your right, for with 
Ihe duty conscientiously done, the 
rights involved will follow, The 
moving cause of our governmental 
success was implanted by the Puri- 
tans who were endowed with a strict 
sense of duty obtained from God, 
Religion is that living out of your- 



self and the answering to someone 
else who is higher than you are. The 
spread of religion in a government 
like ours is, therefore, imperatn 
If I have helped you young men 
understand what those who havejliv. 
have done for us, and what you ow 
to other and to God, and not wh: 
others owe to you, 1 have not faile 
in my message." 

PRESIDENT BUTTERFIELD A'l 
WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

Calls on Students to Think of World 
Problems. 
President Butterfield was tie 
speaker at assembly Wednesday. 
Nov. '.I. DiacuBsiug our part in tie 
present crisis, he said in part : 

"About three-quarters of a center) 
ago .lames Hussell Lowell wrote hie 
'Present Crisis' about what the pen 
pie thought was the greatest evil Of 
the time. Today the European wai 
is a much greater crisis than the civil 
war was. We do npt realize the 
importance of the war. 

"We hear much talk about pea«. 
hut we do not consider whether or not 
peace will be permanent if brought 
about. In the discussion of pea< > 
aud war there comes up the word "mil- 
itarism'. This brings home the fact 
of what happens when the few rule 
Militarism is a few men throwing » 
great many men, who have no say. 
into conflict. The word ' prepare* I - 
uess'comes into the discussion. Thhl 
word has a variety of meanings. We 
as citizens are facing a great eric- 
as part of this great world crisis, and 
it ought to sink into our minds that 
we are not apart from this gi 
war. Many questions come up be- 
fore us regarding morals, rights 
international law and such tiling 
1 vci , pemon is bound to face the 
question, and in the last analysis 
whatever the I nited States doe- 
must be backed up by every citi/en 
of the nation. 

••Wc do not want simply peace at 
anv cost but we want international 
justice. We do not want pea. I 
merely to ayoid war, for some war» 
have righteous causes and it (among 
to get peace at the price of injusth •■ 
We must pay the price of just peace 
in the same way that we pay for the 
health of our bodies The disease of 
war is much the same as body dis. 
es ; it shows that there is something 
wrong. A certain sort of surgery 
may be just as necessary as the sm 
geon's knife in the body, though fl> 
cost is great, 

"The ideal international relation* 
would he the same as the relation i 
bet ween toeo, no deaire for one to g I 
ahead of the other, nothing but msfib 
friendliness. This would make f- 
permanent peace and armament won' I 
take care of itself, if the relatio 
were as among men. Men are n ,f 
allowed to go around with even ©( 
coaled wea|KJ!is. neither should P 
lions under these ideal conditio 
The ideal can not be realized at on 
but we can help to get a detiral 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday. Nov. q, 1915. 



e;ice. A certain group of men 
nave au idea that the way to bring 
ibout peace is to establish a great 
world court which would have sulllc- 
etit armament to enforce whatever 
lws it made. 
••The United States policy will soon 
he known, for congress will again 
neet in a short while and the pohcy 
w\\\ be determined within the next 
six mouths. In the time of Washing- 
ton we could keej) out of the great 
world war because we were not a very 
l:ngc nation. Now we are too big to 
evade the question aud our moral 

obligations are too great. We should 

never be the aggressor, but there are 
times when a nation's honor is at 
*take, It is not only the question of 

ights, but of right. The Monroe 
Doctrine is causing some little dicus- 
tiOO. Some men say we should give 
up the doctrine all together, modify 
it. or stick to it at any cost. We 
ought to decide at once what our 
attitude will be. Our policy will be 
determined by the world policy. If 
all the nations arm we must do like- 
wise and the same with disarmament 
Wc should take the lead if the time 
lias come. We should study om own 

"icigu policy, rights and obliga- 
tions in the light of international law 
iinl our ow n history. 

"It is up to us to find plans for 
pence and for maintaiug peace, but 
ae should study our needs for de- 

• use. Many thousands of dollars 
1 been spent on our 00041 defenses 
Hid some people say that tlu-y are 
'I'solntely worthless now, therefore 
pre should have a guarantee of some 
kind that what money we spend in 
the future will not be wasted. 



ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW 

The annual flower show of the Flor- 

nlture department, which was held 

"Mindav, Monday and Tuesdav, was 

he largest and most successful ever 

. ran at the college, au attendance of 

i 1400 being recorded on Sunday 

• >ne. Prof. William II. Taft was 

Hie of the interested spectators. The 

"hole lower floor of French Hall was 

I for the exhibits, and was very 

tastefully decorated. The college 

-hentra furnished music Sunday. 

Much interest was shown in the 

lompetitive exhibits by members of 

ihe junior and senior classes and very 

seellent work was to be seen. The 

nior class worked with basket decor- 

?ions and in these the lirst prite of 

,jh) went to Kmilis .1. CardareUi of 

<»«lon foi a large basket of yellow 

fssnnthemums and oak leaves. 

irrtck K. Wildoti of Melrose took 

<* second pri/,e of f.l.oo with a bas- 

t of while and pink chrysanthemums 

» bile Stanley W. Hall of Saxonville 

*k third place with a basket of 

tiiwyer roses. Raymond B.Chi sholm 

Melm«p Highland* received honor- 

le mention on a basket of yellow 

vsEinlhemums and barberry. 

In the table decoration! by mem* 

3 of the junior floriculture section 

C. Campbell of Gardner won flr»tj 



place with a tastily decorated table of 
Peter Pan chrysanthemums and 
asparagus pin mom for green. 
I. (I ward S. Dullill of Wakefield with 
I table of < ioldeu Climax Chrysanthe- 
mums and oak leaves took second 
place and ,Iohn T. Dizer of But 
Weymouth took third with a table of 
Dudley and White Killarney roses. 
Milford R. Lawrence of Falmouth 
received honorable mention on a table 
of single yellow chrysanthemums with 
asparagus spreuger for green. All 
the tables were set for six and in 
most cases dainty corsages and bout- 
tonnieres added to the attractiveness 
of the decorations. In this the prizes 
were the same as in the basket con- 
test for seniors. The judges were 
R. S. Carey of South 1 1 ad ley and A. 
1). (Jallivau, and U. II. Sinclair of 
llolyoke. Special classes for mem- 
bers of the Northampton and llolyoke 
Gardeners' and Florists* Club brought 
out many Hue chrysanthemums, carna- 
tions, aud foliage and flowering planta- 
in these classes 6. H. Sinclair, (lal- 
livau Pros., aud (ieorge Strugnell of 
Holyoke ; Rutler and Cllman of 
Northampton. R. S. Carey of South 
Hadley. aud F. I). Keyes of Florence 
were the principal winners. 

Special feature baskets, corsages 
and table decorations, ami a group 
of wedding decorations attracted 
much attention fiom the crowd which 
packed the hall from the time the 
doors opened till late in the evening. 
During the lirst the huurs it whs 
estimated that moie than a thousand 
persons had visited the show. 
Through the courtesay of Butler and 
U II man of Northampton a large col- 
lection of accessories of the florist 
and a large variety of baskets for 
decorative work were also shown, 



NINETEEN THIRTEEN NOTES 

•D«m- Kay" and Marsahll Hadle 
are in charge of 1918 gathering at 
the "Highland" after the Springfield 
game Saturday See 'em at the 
game or be at the •Highland" after 
the game and show the younger hovs 
how its done. A good old 1913 get- 
together! Talk it up and save one 
iron man just for that pin pose. 

Willard II. Ilasey. with 'Rob" 
Frost, IIM5, Tree Surgeons and 
Entomologists, address .'14 Market 
street, Campello, Mass. 

George Zahriskle, 2nd. Cost De- 
partment, Weslinghouae K. A M. 
Co., of England, address Chicopee 

Falls. 

Qiovcr E. Howe, second year Har- 
vard Medical, home address, 3fi 
High street, Marlboro, Mass. 

Nil>« Paul Larson, last year Cor- 
nell Medical, address, Cornell Medi- 
cal, New York City, 

Loomis F. Guild, ex-1918, Postal 
Department, Kcene, N. II. 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN A DYER, Props. 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
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OWE YEAR'S SUPPLY \ fln 
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free Rftmpla copj of thpii M.iu'.i/Iih- If they nub 
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inif standard tfsgsclMa, farm I'apera, I'oultn 

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ftpera. Mall Ordai and Ita.ie Cnbltratlnna 
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kind* of hiifh-t'i.iile interesting mitgnrtnen roan 
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WE-DO-AS-WE-SAY 

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advertisement 



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Cash foi test nrdeis— Article widely Advert(s*d— 
Cuts down expense in power 1 I, nits Address 
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Jobbers of Wrought Iron und BtSM Pipe, Valve* 
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imCKMAX*S 

Candies and Ice Cream 

** I IAMP »■ 

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Creamed Chicken snd Waffles 

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Tel. tM W 

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Dentist 

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South Deerfieid, Miss. 

T. O. AHERN. MANAt.FR 




Burpee's Seeds 



ryyear I 
^me^i- 



arc supplied every yea 
direct DO more Ameri- 
can planters than are 
the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpcc- 
| Quality " Seeds that Grow" ? If not^ wc Would like to 
' make your acquaintance. Simply semi us \our address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, a bright new hook of 1 S2 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 



Page^ Shoe Store 



SPECIAL NOTICE 



Big surpu'vr for M. A. C men m nur store! 

Don't buy Footwear till you see us 

WIJ1»>XIIVI.X<; houi.:. «,..r Lestbei used. 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 5a Center St.. Northampton, Mass,, 

*nd South Hadley, Mass. 

Main Offics; 

1546-1548 Mroadway, 

N*w %'ofk City 



The»e Stuff Ion offer the Ijpbi skilleil 
Aftisits and mcjai complete 

equipim i,t i,l.t;imahle 



NOTE OF THARKS. 

Thanks are due to the kind friends 
who h*ve sent flowera to the infirm* 

:nv. They were men appreefated. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 




DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



< 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 9. *9*5- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 9, 1915. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every T uesday evening 

l.y the Students of (lie Masssiehll- 

HetU AirrlcultureJ College. 



IJOAKD «>K EDITORS. 



IV I. Kit S. BUfiKKS lti. 
RICHARD W. SMITH IT. 
II! \NK .!. S< IIKIT'Kl.KH,, 
THOS. I,. IIAHIMM KHHi. 
M.KKKD A. OlolOSA Hi, 

DWMUR ■•'• BARJiKH 'I* 

Mll.l (»ltl> It. LAW RKNCK I 
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\| \KKIIAU.O. I.AM'IIKAIt I*. Asw'e Kttltnr 



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Hamfflne Mitot 

AHHlHtant Kitilor 
A tli 1ft It- Kdltitr 
Uliletie Editor 

\ 1 11 in ni KUltur 
New* Kdltitr 



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ble toOHARUtl A. Ill M IV .T<>N. .Ill- 

Kntereda*»ei"ii'l ' *• maUir at tin- AmliiTut 
1 ■• >.it OAee. 

Vol. XXVI. Toesday, Nov. 9. No. 8 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



.•-III P. M 



1-18 



\,.u< .•>■ for tliix ••■■liiinn ANN !><• ilrn|»|MMt In 
in Hi,- t ..I I 1 ••! k* ..«*«-•- »r Itundril to William 
Mvllle.Jr. IT "ii "' l.'-foi." Hi. ■S;iIiimI:i> |.r<-<«-'|- 
Ittg r.u Ii l>MM*.] 

Wi i>m -i« \ % . Sov. 10. 

tfteettihly, l<jm%e« U»butt, 
Editor ut the Oertoal 

I'm sun \^ . Met ii. 
M _ Hatting. ••' • "i. in. 1 \n 
Board. 

,, , .-, ... H LI,..- (lull |{eliea)»al 

smi H»A1 . NOI II. 
.i-IHI !• . m, — Football name at s,. m , u - 
lleltl 

S| M. xl . N«.\ I 1 

!..|.-. \ xi « h;»j..-l. tov, saiiuu-l \ 
Eliot, PwldeM ..I the Vnmr- 
,n Unitarian \*soe'uUbni. 
ItoeUHi, 

I I ihI.H, N"\ Irt. 

u-;mi r, M.—aUK-kl trt d gc « lnl». KootB M. 

Flint l.al.. 

Wt WfttMAI N,,x • '"• 
„._ \„,.,nhl%. Ml tVllllMin ( 
ltr.»w«, Former I'teM.lein \.-* 
\ .,rk ( entra! Uailroail 
t-mi 1*. q lrimtiriipf Art Hub, French 
ll;,ll. 



Amherst college fruit trees. The 
students bad an opportunity to get in 
some practical work in orchard reno- 
vating. 

The annual harvest of leaves from 
the campus lawns has been going 
merrily on during the past few weeks. 
It is no mean task to clean up the 
acreB of campus and transfer the 
refuse to the shrubbery about the col- 
lege buildings and walks. This is 
one of the many ways in which stu- 
dents find employment to defray col- 
lege expenses. 

James Davies of Cambridge was 
elected mauager of the freshman riBe 
team at the regular meeting of the 
class last Wednesday. At the same 
time the freshman entertainment com- 
mittee urged all men, who had any 
good live ideas for Freshman Night 
to present them at once. A mass 
meeting was called by the president 
for the evening. Several lively 
speakers attempted to instill a little 
"pep" into the men !>efore the 
Sophomore-Freshman game. Several 
cheers were suggestep ami practised. 
Professor Curry S. Hicks*, albletic 
director of the college, has just re- 
turned from an extended trip through 
western Massachusetts and Vermont. 
The puiposc has not been given out 
but rumor has it that the little trip 
had much to do with the 1917 football 
schedule. Aggie's present team has 
been the cause of a great deal of 
favorable comment in the football 
world of late. It is probably with 
this reputation in view and the hope 
of continuing it during rext season, 
that plans are being made thus eariy. 



1 >rop iu and look over a set of 



NEW ENGLAND 

INTERCOLLEGIATE 

Cross-country Next Saturday. LIPPINGMTS FARM MANUAL 



Next Saturday morning the New 
Kngland Intercollegiate cross-country 
meet will be run over the Franklin 
field comae in Boston. Although the 
University of Maine will enter practi- 
eallv the same team that won last 
year, yet, from the improvement 
shown by the M. A. C. men it looks 
like a possible win for Aggie. Mas- 
sachusetts Tech will have to be reck- 
oned with, but, since there are so 
many men entered it is expected that 
their score will be materially increased. 
The other teams that are entered this 
year are Worcester Tech, Dartmouth, 
M. I. T., Colby, Holy Cross, Wil- 
liams, Brown, tind Bowdoin. 

Richards and Aiken, who finished 
sixth and eighth respectively at last 
years* meet, are expected to better 
that record by finishing ahead of the 
rest. Brown, of M. I. T., who de- 
feated them once this year will find 
two men Saturday who are iu far bet- 
ter condition than before aud who are 
ready to beat him. 

The team that goes down Friday 
will probably be Captain Russell, 
Aiken, Babbitt, Glover, Lyons, Wich- 
ardson, ami Manager Kicker. 



By far the best "series" for the 
busy man. 

A NEATLY CARVED WALNUT CASE WITH 
EVERY COMPLETE SET 

We also have a line of Scierrtitii 
Books which might interest you. 



JOHNSON BOOK CO 

85 Pleasant Street. 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKGVLAR RUNDAV SERVICK AT 7 I* M. 



The Survival 
of the Fittest 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDEK 
Suits Cleaned. Pressed and Dyed. All kinds oi 
Kepairihg (or Ladies and Gentlemen neath dcn»- 
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called (or and delivered. Sell tickets for preMlng, 
4 SUITS FOR #i So 

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Main Street. Amherst, Mass. Nash Bio- k 
On your way to the Post Office. Tel. «j8-W 

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JEWELER and OPTOMETR1SI 

Lenses ground while you wait 

COLLEGE JSWSLRV 

Violin. Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Mrinc- 

AMHKRST, MARK. 
Neat to Post Office. 



1 in i- 



CAMPUS NOTES 
Stanley W, Hyde '17 has 
t.i «J. T. V fraternity. 

Prof. II- T. F.rnald hais recently 
returned from Ottawa, Canada, where 
he delivered an address before the 
Ontario Botomorogical society on 
"Life zones in entomology aud their 
Halations to Crops " 

Former President William H. Tnft 
was tha gw»* Suiwiay of President 
and Mm. Kenyou L. Butterfittd. la 
the afternoon he «m entertained at 
the Psi UfMdkm Houae, Amheral eoU 
lege. He was acOTmpanUfd toHpring- 
field by Professor and Mm, h<lwin L. 
G roa ve nor of Amherst college. 

The junior Pomology claa* made a 
trip 3»it Monday for it»troctten in 
pruning *Bd In •ndlBg dteeasia of 
fruit trees. The <*»«* «f '«fty in ™ 
waa conducted by ProffttOf Sears 
ami vi-sited tin- Allen on-htnl and the 



SIXTY COUPLES EHJOY 

SATURDAYS INFORMAL 

Good Music and Victory over Mld- 
dlebury Combine for Good Time. 
About 60 couples attended Satur 
day's informal dance in the Drill hall 
after the Middlebury game. A Ithoogh 
the number was smaller thau at the 
first affair of the season, the music 
b\ the college orchestra was very 
satisfactory, and ■ good time for all 
wm the reault. The usual decora- 
tions prevailed, with the addition of 
a strip of blue around the hall cover* 
tog the beating pipes. Supper was 
served in Draper hall at intermission, 
with dancing from I to f. and 7 to 
H-45, The following men attended : 
igiB—Laird, King. Strauss. Little, 
Sander. Gilmore, Harrocks. Fernald. 
i Hathaway. Darling, Moaes, Good- 
win, Rogeri, 

1 01 7— Henderson. Ruttrick. Hill. 
jRosi, Wither, Sims, C. Gu renin, 
i Latham, Haliett, Irving, Snville, 
I Bookman, R. W, Smith 

1918— Tilton, g- H, Jackson, Mar- 
•halt, Rlohtrdaon, L. Hpauldlng, Dil 




Amherst 



Tried in the farnace of competition 
and tested on nearly a^oo.eoo farms 
the world over, the De Laval ha* 
proved iu auperionty to all other 
cream separator*. 

Think of all the separators you used 
to see advertised so extravagantly. 
Where are they now? Why do you 
seldom, if at all, »ee their names men 
tinned t Simply hecauie the fittest 
must survive and the otheri must fall 
„ut of the race. 

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

MB r.r.Kirtwuy %••« V"'l- 

B E, MmiII«"M hi . i In. .in" 



GO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 
Collars. 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry 



10- 1 J" 

2 I K 
1 I 2C 

48c per dor 
30c per 6m 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Sun 



Ion, Back, O. 8. Dwris, Weeks, 
vanAIiiyne, Boaiu Powdll, C. T, 
Smith. 

1919— Gray, (Jay. F. K. Montgom- 
ery, Clupp. Carley, (lowland. Goff. 

/.aliriskii- *]:!. Porter "II, Stevens 
Ml. Ferry *l. r ». Faiiif. L. Johnson, 
Underbill, Burke, Roberteon- 



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gTKPHKN Lank Foi-OKH 

MANI'rACII'RIMO .IWRLKH 

ISO HfeOAUWA Y. n K W Vow H 

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aoi.o. «itviHi *Jtn Mttowx« mmtttkum 

S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER * OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Piessin! St. 
ftcuiists' Prewrdpltou* Killed- Uroken l.cnw> 
^CMratpl? Keplacert line Hitch R^iialrtns; 
VroinptW arrd Skillulb fJow. 

S»titf»ctiOTi t*B«ranteeii 



R.T. F«o<tT,A|rent; D. Smrrin> am, A»*t Ae»nt 

Tr? oyr ticket *j rti>Bi 

Put full name and address on laundry 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Floricultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of tut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This itoc* 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions, Roses, carnati"f>s. 
violets, chrysanthemums and s««t 
peas in season. 

(JKOWN ON THE CAMPUS 

1 . 1. 1. 1...... .urn 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing, 
timid work speaks for llarl 
Naah Block, Amherst, «*»» 



^OPHS DEFEAT FRESHMEN TALK BY H. E. STOCKBRIDGE 

EASILY BY SCORE OF 2l-0 On Wednesday morning. Novero-i 
Much Talked of Frethman Turn Fails ber third. R. K. Stotkbridge 'T8 
to Come Through spoke before Miss Goesaman's ehiss 

In an exciting game on Alumni | in Rural Sociology bringing to the 
Field Thursday afternoon the Sopho- ; class matters that were of interest on 
mores fairly walked away with the ' the campus during the days he spent 
I reshmen and won handily 21-0. in college. His first item was of I 



CAMPION 



Though much had been expected of 
the 1919 team due to its fine record 
this season, the exhibition of foot- 
l.ull put up against the Sophomores 
was a decided disappointment. Out- 
side of penalties, the Freshman made 
only one first down, that on a fine for- 
ward pass. Their backs were help- 
less before 191H's stonewall defense. 
The Sophomore backs, on the other 
hand, made long gains through the 
I rt'shman line. Sedgwick, Moyni- 
I i:t ii and Holmes starred for 191M, 
while Mnnsell and Pond played well 
for I91!». 

The first score came after six min- 
utes of play. A series of line 
plunges brought the hall to the Freab- 



the celebration following the Tildcii- 
II ayes election of *7n. When the 
returns were tirst received the elec- 
tion of Tilden wa* announced. How- 
ever, due to disputed votes in several 
states including Florida, Georgia 
and Oregon it was found that Hayes 
should hold office. This informa- 
tion came at a later dale and iu the 
mean time the ten or twelve local 
Democrats in college planned to cele- 
brate — They pulled the old bftUM 
twelve pounder out on campus and 
brought the cartridges from the old 
Armory then located iu the present 
Klectricty building. But the lie- 
publican representation objected 
strongly to the display. So when 



Fine 



Tailoring" 



■ 



man's five van! line, where .Jackson 1 one of the celcbratois appeared at 



»hot a forward to Grayson, who 
just fell across ihe line for a touch- 
.lown, .lackson kicked the goal. 



South College carrying the fuses he 
was beset on all sides. All of his 
comrades but one who were waiting 



During the second and third quartern I for him by the cannon and its supply 



the hall was mostly in Freshman ler- 

litory. Not until the fourth quarter, 

however, was there another score. 

After holding the Sophomores on 

their one yard line, 1919 punted to 

Grayson who ran the ball back to the 

vard line. Sedgwick made 10 

litis anil then on an end run fifteen 

more for a touchdown. The third 

touchdown came in the last minute 

rl play. Bent caught a forward 

pass and raced 10 yards for the final 

score. .Sedgwick kicked the goal. 

Lineup 1 



COLLEGE OUTFITTER 



Ready-To- Wear Clothes 

A new line ol lio. shirts and caps for thai Springfield game. 

WOOLLEY 'if". Agent, up in No. | South College 




A SHERARD 



MEN'S STORE 



Use Our New Cash Discount Card and Save Five Per Cent 



ON 



rMUMtUMOmCM 

MtKi'ts le 

Holme*, It 

• alien, la 

Duett, < 

Hubert!., m 
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Hi Itardnoii. M 
' .myiton. ah 
Miis nihan. Ihli 
Sfdmriek, rhlt 

I trkiwili, til 



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re. Mansell 
ri. Rosa 

rg, \v 1 

i . Sexton 

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le. fin) 

tfb, Whittle 

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>t iiire-S<»|ili«iiiii>reH St, Frenliiiieii U, 

-"tlislil tiles Sniihittiioien : Ilojil t«»r 

1 ;i|ien, l.iidilwin fur ttoliertu, lleiit fur 

l.nksiui, IMlltiii Itir llent; Kresliineii ; 

1 1 Mile} ,ur Mannell. I'latt f«ir (imlev, 

1 1 \1111 for Olani'hanl. Touelilmw an— 

ii ray boo, Setlswlek, iu«nt. QoeJa from 

lehdowna— Jaekmin ~j. Sedgwick, 

t.ree - llulilianl of Amherst. im 

, r, — luaeh Itriiles*. Ileail Iiiiei.itiaii 

links. Ttwe—li minute quarters. 



Herbert Collingwood, eilitor of 

he Uurul Xev: Yorlif-r, is t<j address 

he memlrers of the Stockbridge 

1I1 and the students in the Journal' 

a courses soon. The R«r<il 3T#w 

•ikf-r under the editorship of Mr. 

•lllugwood, is one of the foremost 

f agricultural journals in the country. 

Collingwood will speak on why 

makes the fiurnl STew Ynrk* r the 

mi of a paper it is, ami will give 

■ reasons for the policies followed 

the itimit Spii' York< r iu pre- 

•iting agricultural subjects. 



of ammunition enine to his aid. The 
ruse was caiefully laid, so that there 
would be practically DO interference 
when two of the Republicans rushed 
up seized the rod powder saci and 
Bade for the brook, the sight of our 
present pond. Discovering the trick, 
the local support of democracy gave 
chase and the whole college was in ; 
full cry on a efOSt campus run. Hut' 
the discovery was too late to avoid 
the |M>wder from going into the 
brook followed by the two tttteves 
to hold it at the bottom until thor- 
oughly soaked ami spotted. 

His second item was one of na- 
tional importance and bad to do with 
the disappearance of "The Ureal 
American Desert" antl the origin of 

"Dry Farming." It was during this 
time that Professor stoekbridge and 
Goessrnan togethei with other mem- 
ben of the faculty undertook the 
study of the movement of soil waters, 
The objects of the experiments were 
to determine the relations between 
rainfall, pereolative capillarity, ^nd 
evaporation. These were the firslex- 
periments of the kind in this country 
and were brought about by the 
knowledge of similar work going on 
at the Rotnamsted Kxperlment sta- 
tion in Fngland. The results arrived 

at were those familiar to every stu- 
dent of elementary Agronomy, 
namely, evaporation and loss of noil 
water is prevented by shallow culti- 
vation 

Another series of experiments of; 
great scientific interest dealt with the] 
sap pressure in plants and established 
many facts of interest with reference j 
to the Circulation of mo, in livinir 

plants. Both of the above pieces of I 
work weie of such an accurate us- j 
ture and so fundamental in their re- 
sults that they have done much in 
shaping our bo-cr1I,wI modern idea?, 
of plant life and agriculture. They 
also show the prominent place that ' 
M. A. C. held in the seicntifte work 
of the dav. 



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Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



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Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to sec you. 



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The Kexatl Store <m the Cornet 



1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 9, 191 $. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 9, 1915. 



J. GINSHUHG 

u 1-2 Amity Strett 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

75c Special Half Sole, Rubber 75c 

HKI'AIHING 

Hlack, Tan, While Work liu;ir.iiiti-i-d. 

i»wici<:« 

K'ibber .Soles , ... 

Kiibber Soles, with Heek • 

*<,ir* Sewsd, .... 

!i slim. » for »mmi 



E. B, DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DKNTAL ROOMS 
Williams Hlock, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: Qluli A, M„ I JJtojP. II. 



STEAM KITTING. Telephone »— K 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

• l.fto Chukch Windows, Memorial 

Windows, Leao Lights, &c. 



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Established 1904 

, M. IABROVITZ 



FINE 



Merchant Tailor 

and GENTS' FURNISHINGS 



We will call and deliver clothes 



Dyeing, Altering, Cleaning and Pressing 

Full Oress Suits to Rent and Dress Supplies 



1 1 AMITY ST., 
AMHERST, - - - MASS. 



Telephone 302-W. 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 

the most economical you can use. 

Better LnOrJ 

... — - are the inevitable result. 

llHUUiP ' 

THE ROGERS ft HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

IIIHi-c »««<! W"it»«, l*«>rlli»inl, « oiiii 




Huntington Ave., Exeter and Itlagden St«., Boston, Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city, 

AMOI H. WHIPPLE. PROP 

(J&rptrvter & Morehoust, 

PRINTERS, 



No. t, Cook Place, 



Amherat, Mas* 



Y. M. C. A. 

NOTES 



Bible Study Lectures. 

Ab a result of the conference held 
in. Northampton last Saturday, be- 
tween members of the Y. M. U. A. 
cabinet and I'lofessors (irant and 
Wood of Smith college, and Profes- 
sor Genung of Amherst college, the 
Campus Service committee is able to 
make the following announcements in 
regard to liible study lectures for the 
remainder of the year. 

On Nov. I*, Professor Grant will 
deliver the first of a series of four 
lectures on ••( Mil Testament History 
1 1 1 > to New Testament Times. '* 

Beginning with the second semes- 
ter a series of lectures will be 
delivered by Professor Wood on '-The 
liible Situation," and another series 
b\ Professor GeBUttg OB "liiblical 
Ideas." 

It teemed to be ihc desire of a 
huge number from the student liodj 
to have instruction in Bible Study, 
and it is hoped that these men will 
give their whole hearted support to 
this new movement. Rtmu »>#/» ;•. the 

first lecture is to be given one week 
from Thm sd:i\ evening. All men 
interested :ue eordiallv invited to 

attend. 

Deputation Work. 
Lust .Saturday Mr. sherU. actum- 
panted l*v Merrill '17, and Sampson 
'I* journeyed toCuminingtoii for the 
first of the series of deputation trips 
of the Veer. The men were enter- 
tained by the boys in their homes 
over Saturday snd Sunday, and meet- 
iligs were held on both days, those of 
Saturday being of a recreational ami 
■Octal nature, and thote Of Sunday 

being devotional. 



Sow is the time to be planning for 

Fraternity Groups 

„__Have them Uken at 

M3BS McCLELkAJKPS STUDIO 

4I State Street, - Northampton, Mass 



APPLE PACKING SCHOOL 

The annual one week ■' School for 
Apple packing" lit the .Massachusetta 
Agricultural college will be given 
this year Nov, 17 to 28. This is a 
short, very practical course and 
those taking the work perforin all the 
operations of preparing fruit for the 
commercial markets until they be- 
come proficient in each step, Tbey 
are then given the opportunity of 
putting up commercial packs for the 
market. The practical work ii* sup- 
plemented by lectures and deraooatra- 
tioDs on various phages of the busi- 
ness of apple growing, Those who 
1 are interested should communicate at 
once with William l). Hurd, M.A ( . 
Amherst, Mass., as the school is lim- 
ited to 80 students and several have 
it! read v registered. Two lectures and 
two periods of practical work are 
given each day. The requirements 
of the apple grading law which goes 

into effect In I'mc. empbasixe the 

value of this st'hool just at this lime. 
Special attention will be given to the 
provision of this law. 



CLASS OF ion 

Adams, James F., University Cli . 
State College, Pa., assistant pro- 
sor of Iiotany. 

Allen, Park W.. Westlield, u h 
S. A. Allen & Son Insurance & Real 
Kstate. 

Better, Herbert .!., Connects -it 
Agricultural eollege, Storrs, Conn, 
Director Kxtension Service. 

Barrows, Raymond C, Staffonl 
Springs, Conn., U. I). 2 farmer. 

Bentley, Arnold <!., S6 New Bed* 
ford St., Hyde Park. Purchasing 
agent, Becker Milling Machine Com- 
pany. 

Blaney, Herbert W., 305 W. Mon- 
roe Ave., Bloomington. 111., land- 
scape architect. Married on Aug, 
r.i, 1915, to Miss Charlotte Gieea* 
of Lowell. 

Brown, Kdgar If., 2i> State St., 
Hartford. Conn. Vice-president ui 
the dames L. Goodwin Associates, 
landscape gardeners. 

Bursley. Allyn P., 1999 Kiic-IhI 
Ave.. Cleveland. Ohio. With A. I) 
Taylor, landscape architect. Bm- 
alev'l engagement to Miss Murjorie 
L. Brand of Plain field, N. .1 ban 
recently been announced 

( oiiant. Arthur T. Sundei hunl. 
farmer. 

Damond, t harles H-. I"» Woodbine 
Ave,, Northampton. With Mast 
Highway ( oniinission. 

Davis. K. N.. Hampden, lain 
Davis. I. W,, New Haven, Conn,, 
'/, Agricultinal Ksperiment Station. 
Superintendent in charge of male 
work on control of Gvpsv and Browi 
Tail Moth. 

(Jilgore. I. C, *W s ':'I< W 
Schenectady. N. V.. fanner. 

Hill, N. Herbert. I I Park Pl.i 
Princeton, N. .1.. farmer, 

.lenks. A. K'., Springfield. Will, 
Hampden ( ounty Improvement Lea- 
gue. 

Johnson, Leonard M.. NeWtOB 
Conn., principal of ihe N.wtoii liieli 
aehool. 

Lahoutelev. <i. K. Three Rivers, 

* - 

farmei . 

Larrabee, Kdward A., W Central 
St., Boston. With A. W. Allis C». 
Advertising Kxperts 

Lull, Robert D., Hardwick. 
agerof Hardwick Farmers Exchange 

McGraw. Frank D., 5§ Tecuii-<!i 
St., Fall River. Painting coDtrac it 

McLaughlin. Frederick A.. Am- 
heist. Instructor in botanv at M * 
C. 

Morse. Henry B., Dean Acath • 
Franklin. Instructor. 

Nagai. Isalniro, Tokio, Japan. »IS* 
dent at Imperial university. 

Nickersoo, George P., Ci 
Adjutant General. I . S. A 
Wnshingtcjii, 1). C, recently lot *"' 
in Mexican Frontier. 

Nieisou, (i. A. Home eddre 
Webster St., West Newton. Us ' 
in CaoadiSQ Northwest, 

Ostrolenk, Beruhard, M:» 
Minn., teacher. 

Parsons, Samuel R., Unn 
Club, Slate College. P:i. Insti 
in physics. 



ateh, Roland H., Department of 
i|, culture. Cornell university, Ithaca, 
\ V.. instructor. 

auly, H. A., Lexington. With 
]'. i'k-Robinson Nursery Co. 

ackard, P. W., 13 Chatham St., 
Boston, With Bowker Insecticide 
i 

iper, Ralph VV., South Acton. 
1- uier. 

J'routy, Philip H,, National Farm 
m iooI, Farm School, Pa. Instructor 
a; i farm manager. 

uaeicot, P. A., Chrome, N. J., 
cli. mist with American Agri. Chemi- 
cal Co. 

sharpe, A. H., Winona, Ontario, 
Canada, landscape architect with (£, 
|i Smith it Son. 

Smith, C. A., Jefferson Medical 
...liege, Philadelphia, Pa. Deinon- 
strator of chemistry. 

Smith, R. (J., Amherst. Gradu- 
al, assistant in botany. M. A. C. 

Meveuson, L. (>., 8837 Ksplanade 
Ave., New Orleans, La. Business 
ail.lress, Yol Carondelet St. 

Warren, K. EL, Leicester, farmer. 

Whitney, Raymond L. Whitney, 
."»7 Ash St., Brockton. 

Willard, H. P., Mid- Pacific college, 
Honolulu, T. H. teacher. 

Winn. E. L., Elizabeth, N. J., 
«itli Bowker Chemical Compauy. 

The 191 1 men are urged to note 
corrections or changes in the aliove 
list and send them to L. M. Johnson, 
MCretSTS and to the CoLLROlaM. 



NINETEEH-FIFTEEN NOTES 

llemember Springfield ! Not only 
tlmt, dig up the money and get there. 
Reunion at the Highland after the 
pmte, 

Karle 8. Draper, located in Char- 
lotte, N. C.. as Southern repressent- 
ttt^e for John Nolen, landscape 
hi hitect of Cambridge, has person- 
allv been appointed as landscape 
itect in the development of 

I ijuil Park, a sanatorium to be 
••mil near Charlotte including 75 

- Of rolling country and designed 

• the largest institution for the 

'mem of nervous diseases in the 

Ni Hi "Drape" recently spoke be- 

the C'entral Carolina Civic Con- 

• held in Charlotte, on **Com- 

'y Landscape Planning." 

r 1 Towne has just left the employ 

»»f the Charles M. Cox Company and 

ks» not yet decided where to award 

Ii next contiact for his valuable 

cee, 

\llic" Wilkins has left Bridge- 
P c »« and Is now with a florist in 
Ml Hehl, 

a 1»" Si an ford la working at the 
" i Carolina Experiment station In 
[Ethology. 
1 ent visitors at college include 

II White and Ralph MeLaln, 
is working for the Boston 

ed. Harry is at a Uteological 
ny In Hartford, where he ex- 
o remain two years, before go- 
Turkey as a missionary. 



MUSICAL CLUBS 
In the schedule of the Musical 
Club trip for the Christmas holidays, 
the big feature that is planned is the 
Copley-Plaza a If ail, — the biggest 
event ever attempted by the musical 
organization. A concert will be fol- 
lowed by a dauce lasting until 2a,m. 
in one of the finest halls in the hotel. 
The tickets are $1.50 a piece or $3 a 
couple. This is extremely moderate, 
when it is considered that the concert 
and dance is to be held in the finest ho- 
tel in New England. If the alumni and 
student IkhIv will support the Musi- 
cal Chilis, Aggie will make a name 
for itself in a social way. This en- 
gagement is not a mouey making pro- 
position but is planned to advertise 
the college, and give the young 
alumni a chance to get together. 

Three dollars a couple — think of 
it! The price of an informal! We 
go to luformals. slide around on the 
well-worn Drill Hall noor ami have a 
"great time." But, consider the 
Copley-Plaza with its beautiful ball 
room, — a fitting stage for I Prom, 
all for the price of an Informal with 
a concert combined. Why argue. 
Only .~>o men from the entire student 
laxly signified their intentions of sup- 
porting the Musical Clubs last Wed- 
nesday in this concert and dance. 
These figures must be at least doubled 
to ever pay for the ball room. Let's 
make it a success aud show Boston 
that there is a State College in Massa- 
chusetts socially as well as from an 
athletic aspect. 



\ 



a i 



ALUMNI NOTES 
Ex-* |0.— Mr. and Mrs William A. 
Newton announce the marriage of 

their daughter Delia Eliza to Allen 
J. Robb, on Tuesday, Oct. II'. at 
Wilbraham. 

*10. — Mr. and Mrs. K. Harrison 
Turner announce the arrival of 
Thorley Kverard Turner, Aug. 14, 
1915, at South Da n bury, N. II. 
The 1910 Class Baby Cup to be 
awarded to the first male child l»oru 
after June 1, 1915, will be presented 
to this young man at the reunion of 
the class, provided no otlfci appli- 
cants have a lietter claim, 

Ex-*I2, — The grasshopper outbreak 
in New Mexico during the summer of 
1918 is the subject of a department 
Entomology Bulletin written by II. 
K. Smith, published under the dale 
of Oct. 7. Smith is entomological 
assistant in the Cereal and Forage 
Insect Investigation of the Bureau of 
Kntomology, 

*18,— A recent number of Pm/eh? 
contains two articles by Harold Lyo,- \ 
written from the entomological lab- 
oratory of flie BiiMsey Institute. One 
is entitled "Notes on the Cat Flea" 
and the other, "Does the Housefly 
hilwrnale as a pupa?" 

* 14, —Harry Nissen is in charge of 
the poultry at Stannox Farm, Sher- 
borne. It is rumored that he will 
soon take unto himself a better half. 



COME OVER 
LET'S GET 
ACQUAINTED 




We are ready to show sou everything that the college man 

needs for comfort in the wa\ of clothes. Here are .i few 

of our many offerings, and remember thej are in 

every Case the best of their kind. 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Ready Clothes 

In fust the styles you*re looking for — Four other good makes. 

MACKINAWS FROM $5 UP 

See the famous Patrick line before vou uei yours. 
We'll save you money. 

The Oakes Sweater is the best made at any price. 

THE PRICES ARE: FROM $S TO ST 

Ahxdnielv pun- wool and made to wear, 

COMPLETE LINES CF SOFT HATS AND CAPS IN THE LATEST SHAPES AND C0L0RIN6S 



Bxcluslve Custom Tailoring at Fair Price.* 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



n 



E. Frank Coe Fertilize rs 

1 OCT THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD 1Q1C 
lOOf FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS 1919 



A 



Your Opportunity 

The edilor el one ol our leading agricul- 
tural papers writes us under dale of January 
12th, 19 I 5. as follows :- 

"I am doing all I can to induce fanners to 
plant gram crops this year. 

"Grain is very high and it is going higher. 
Wheal is going lo $2.00 per bushel and other 
grains will share in the advance. Wheat costs 
$2.50 per 1 00 pounds now. and pound for 
pound oats cost as much. 

"Il «eenB to me that the eastern farmer t 
salvation is to buy plant food and grow 
CORN, WHEAT, BARLEY, 
OATS AND BUCKWHEAT 

"Last fall I douhled my acreage of winter 
wheat and this spring I shall tnple the acreage 
of oats. I managed to produce 40 bushels 
• .I mIh-.iI lo the acre, and sold me straw at 
$ I 7.00 per ton in ihe bam." 

THE OPPORTUNITY IS YOURS! 
Be tare that you buy 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

They are available plant foods that more than meel the 
icting requirements, giving plump, sound, full heads of gram and vigor- 
on*, healthy straw. 

Eastern users erf E. Frank Coe F«ti!i?en are raising 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre. The average for the United States for three yeara 
is I4i'n bushels to the acre. 

THE OWWnjNITY IS YOURS ! WHX YOU MAKE THE MOST OF IT ? 



V 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, SI Chambers St, N. Y 



5/ 




I 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 9. '9 ! S' 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

N.pw 1'ic.itfil ov.t jmsi i.tlitf. I ' p >>ne tliahl 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System lei. 36- M 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

1 »|hsii .-Minciay from ;-u. f )n your way to P. O, 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner of llillm.in md BarSM streets, tliiee 
l.lin.k*from the Union Depot, is » modern hos- 
telry run on lite Kuropeati Plan. It is just a step 
I rom Main Street, away from the none anddust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well luniished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices SI ami up: rooms 
with bath (.single) Sl.SU and up. 

It* excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
1 mi 111 makes a meal a pleasant meniory-evei y_ 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in tne best possinle manner. 

May at the Highland Motel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again Mush every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 

>|,i iiigll.l.l. M>«««. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swmi 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

0U1 RULE 

"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



II IK hi MIMl llol.l. 



STUDEHT FUitHI TUBE 

RUGS 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

H. D. MARSH ESTATK 

COX SONS 

— ANt> — 

VINING 

7t*74 Madison Avenue. New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Beit Materials and Workmanship 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIEL.D, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 




Associate Alumni, 

J oiut Committee on Intercollegiate At 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'd Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Aasociutiou, 

litis* hull Association, 
Track Association. 
Hockey Association, 
Tennis Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeeu Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association. 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



tile tics, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
11. II. (lore, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
S. W. Hall, President 
C W. Moses, Manager 
A. W. Spauldiug, Manager 
I). A. Ricker, Manager 
<\ A. Huutiugton, Jr., Manager 
Moorhouse, Manager 
II. AiUeu, President 
.1. T. Nicholson, Manager 
FA. Anderson, Manager 
L. E. Fielding, Manager 
F. W. Mayo, Manager 
A. J. Hicks, President 
E. L. King, President 
C. IL Gould, President 
|{. F. Tuber, President 



lh*r«are Sei«n Good K-.ton* whv v<>u»h<>iild 
buy your 



COAL 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

37 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Ctottd only from t A. M. to 4 A. M 

RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton. MaMachuaetU 

TWO itOCtM FUMM TH* BWm 

The hotel where there is comfort (with- 

out extravagance,) More popular 

than ever. 



Staiionery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous llloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
Plains'* to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Miles of Trackage -riodem 
Equipment -Train Dispatch- 
ing System- Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

M » M KIM BOOK AOKNTH. 

Both sexes, for best seller published. PSfttnlMl 

and outfit free, 
UKO. W. HOMKKS. 1-S, M. AngMallnf, Its. 

COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in t re- 
state outside of Boston. 

MODERN REPAIR OEPT. 

B.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOF.MAN 

CARS 

Leave AOQIB COLLEQE for HOI - 
YOKE at 15 mln. past the hour. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and $7 mln. past the hour. 

At 



AHERST I SUNDfJ&MD ST. IL CO 



s,.r. M l I r..n I2-] P. M. 

PRIVATE DININC ROOMS 
A la Carte Service 

ft. »0 to II l" M 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. ** 



1424-1426 Chcitnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



'TIS IS TBRP«Y S»^»1*0» 

t 'I -ami »ic FnMwlBB ■*p»lrls» 
Qalekeat **r«lc*. iw.t Work, UWtrt rr»« 
All wotk carefully den*. Work called for w< 
delivered. Gtnti' oweoati, i«*^ jastt ■» 
coats. Ladies' hne linen »uita a apacialtT 
Teams will call «wy day at M. A 1 

WH. MtASKLIK. Pr«I> 
Hear Na»h Bl% Atthswt. Tel. Ho 3*» « 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Co. 

6ifi Cbeatnut St.. Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

Diamond Merchants..... 

Phlladalpkla a Official Fntinltv Jt»* 

SrEOIALISTSIH 

Fratern.ty Badge*. Fob., Nov <• 
Rings, Charms ...... Prises. Trot &»*• 

Medali College Ptea, *««*, MfH 

Ringe, Charma 





\fcf ri 



MASSACHUSETTS AGKICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 10, 1915. 



No. 9 



AIKEN TAKES SECOND PLACE 
AT N. E. INTERC0LLEG1ATES 



Maine Again Wins Cross Country 

Title with Aggie Finishing in 

Fifth Place. 

Massachusetts brought home fifth 
place from the annual New England 
iutercollegiate cross-country run, Sat- 
urday, at Franklin lie Id. Boston. 

Twenty-nine minutes and seventeen 
MOOOda after the crack of the start- 
er's pistol, Aiken crossed the finish 
Jine a close second to Brown of M. I. 
t. who beat Aiken by less than twenty- 
nine seconda. Following these came 
Bell, Maine. 29 min.. 25 1-5 sec. ; 
Tucker, Dartmouth, 29 min., SI sec. ; 
bane, Hates, 29 min., 87 sec. The 
first six men finished in less than a 
minute of the winuiug time. 

As far as the fourth mile the run- 
ners- remained well bunched, led part 
of the way by Richards, M. A. (\ 
Ibre Bell of 31 uine forged ahead, hut 
was speedily overtaken by Brown and 
\ikeu, both of whom showed consist* 
nnt bead work in conserving their 
• i length at the beginning of the race. 

Much keener competition prevailed 
tliis year and the team deserves a 
gri<t dual of credit for the showing 
ila-v made. Aiken ran a fine race, 
not attempting to pass until the cru- 
cial moment. Richards ran well up 
to the last mile where the pace became 
too fast for him and lie was forced to 
drop into sixth place. (Mover and 
Lyons ran a beady race and showed 
p>od team work, finishing 27th and 

'h respectively. Russell linished 

lOUt. 

With 108 points this year Aggie 
li-'i 5lh where 115 points last 
. '-ar gave M A, C. 4th place. 

The standing of the colleges hy 

nils was ; Maine 69. Dartmouth GH, 
M. I. T. 98. Brown 101, M. A. C. 
!<>*, Worcester Tech. D*0. Williams 

U Bates 154. 



NINETEEN SEVENTEEN INDEX 
ANNOUNCEMENT 

Attention Boys!! Attention 1 1! ! 

will be on the campus Dec. 10 
lie hest hook ever, containing all 
ii could lie wished for, and a little 
'te, in the line of two new big 
i lures. To be progress! va, is yoar 
:biiion— the 1917 Index will be 
great help in the attainment of 
id ambition. Get in line for some 

mledge from the *» Peerless" edl- 
•11 of the college annual. Kerne in- 
r — Christmas Is coming. 




I'U.MKU MaKINC DkI.AVKO <Jl UHKIiliAl K RtN 



DR. LYMAN ABBOTT SPEAKS 
AT WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 



Tells Students to Keep Up Fight to 

Abolish Pauperism and Other 

Evils of Society. 

"Prophets," said President Butter- 
field in introducing Dr. Lyman Ah- 
ix.it. of New York, as the foremost 
prophet of his day, "are not so much 
foretellers as forth- tellers or inter- 
preters." Dr. Abbott spoke at Wed- 
nesday Assembly on "The Sword of 
the Christ" iu substance as follows: 

When volunteers answer a sum- 
mons to war they want to know what 
money, rank, or honor may be gained 
or what service they may render their 
country by such a sacrifice as de- 
manded, and the recruting officer, 
assuming him to be an honest man, 
tells there that what they receive will 
be the satisfaction of knowing they 
have given their services for a com- 
mon good, .lesus Christ came into 
the world as a leader of men for the 
sake of the greatest need of man- 
kind. The disciples Christ desited 
were men willing to give up their 
family and friends aud devote all 
their energy to making the world a 
better plate in which to live. 

If society were rightly organized, 
there would be no such thing as 
poverty. There will always lie men 
trying to cure diseases — social, physi- 
cal and moral. We should equip 
ourselves to do things that naturally 
help, instead of confining ourselves 
to sympathy, Everyone most put 
his hand to the plough and turn the 
sod for others, 

It is now common knowledge that 
a criminal is bettered by being cured, 
not punished. What if attempts to 
right wrongs bring a storm of criti- 



SPRINGFIELD GAME IS 
AGGIE VICTORY, 14-13 

M.A.C. Rooters See First Win Over 
Rivak Since 1907 

FORWARD PASSES FEATURE 



I < "lit Itin.-l on 



11 



FRESHMEN VS. SOPHOMORES 
IN ANNUAL DEBATE TUESDAY 

Compulsory Military Training to Be 

Discussed by Teams from Two 

Lower Classes. 

The annual freshman-sophomore 
debate will be held in the auditorium 
nevt Tuesday cvi'ilng Tim team? 
representing the two classes will be 
for the sophomores (taking the nega- 
tive) William If. luring, Gardner C- 
Norcross ami Kred II. SampsoD. 
The freshman team will consist of 
Robert H. Collins, James Window, 
and Henry J. Hurl who will uphold 
the ;iilii mative. The question is, 
Resolved : That every male citizen of 
the United States Bbould be obliged 
to serve at least two years in the 
militia. 

This year it is expected that the 
freshman team will meet some outside 
tesms either other college freshmen or 
preparatory school teams. 

GRAYSON CHOSEN CAPTAIN 

OF 1916 FOOTBALL TEAM 
Has Played Varsity End For Two Sea- 
sons And Is All-round Athlete. 

Emory E. Grayson "17 of Mi I foul 
was elected captain of the I VI 6 foot- 
ball team at the football banquet held 
at the Cooley hotel Saturday evening, 
lie has played on the varsity for the 
past three yearn. During bis fresh- 
man year tirayson played as a sub- 
stitute half back and Hophomorc year 
attentate between the backlleld and 
end. During the past season he held 
down the left wing and showed a rare 
ability which resulted in his election 
to the captaincy, flraynon is also a 
member of the senate and has been 
class president. He is a member of 
Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity. 

[Continued an pass Sj 



Thirteen Point Lead of Y. M C A Men 

Not Enough to Stop Great Aggie 

Come-Back in Second Half. 

With thirteen points against her at 
the ead of the lirst half of Saturday's 
game with Springfield Massachusetts 
started one tbe greatest come-backs 
ever seeu on I'ratt Held aud downed 
her old rivals for the 1'irnt time slMC 
1907 by the score of 14*19. The 
game was bard fought from kick oil 
to the final whistle, and while Spring- 
field piled up the lead iu the first firM 
part of the game, the greater punch 
of the Aggie team in the closing 
periods deserved tbe well-earned 
victory. Coach Brides has every 
it.t-.on to feel buppy o\ei the n • 
full close of the best season Aggie 
ever had. 

Two thousand Aggie sup|>orters 
who went to Springfield saw the 
home team hold like iron while the 
Imckticld that was touted to be a 
wonder did not come across. The 
famous Minnesota shift failed to 
work but Palmer brought out a series 
of forward passes that tuade a record 
aud won the game. Out of seven 
trials there were seven perfect passe* 
tbat gained some 100 yards for hi* 
team Palmer aud Darling were the 
chief supjKtrts of their team, al- 
though It is hardly fair to gi\> 
special credit to any one man, the 
whole eleven playing a brilliant team 
game. 

In analyzing the game it i* shown 
that Aggie held the ball most of the 
time and after tbe first quarter it 
was in Springfield's leiritory. Th<\ 
took about three times as much 
ground as Springfield on rush**. 
Calmer was out-punted by Miller but 
Miller was forced to punt more often. 
Sermon made the longest gain of the 
day with a run of 6H yards on taking 
a forward pass, bis own flO yard 
line to tbe M. A. C .'I'-' yard mark. 
To Massachusetts goes the credit for 
the most ground gained on forward* 
with 100 yards in seven tries. 

The features of the game irtfi 
Palmer's delayed quarterback runs 
tbat gained ground whenever tried 
and his accurate and timely beav 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov, 16, 191 5. 



ing of passes. Darling proved to 
be up to his usual style and a con- 
sistent ground gainer, his twisting 
runs giving the two touchdowns that ■ 
meant victory. Day and Grayson 
filled the positions at the ends of the 
line with credit, while Perry and 
Dunn played good foothall in the 
line. For Springfield Sermon and 
Cooper carried off individual honors. 
Sermon proved to be the most valu- 
able ground gainer for his team al- 
though he was closely attended by 
nearly all of the Aggie eleven. 
Cooper at fullback stopped practi- 
cally every play that came through 
the line and broke through to stop 
plays around the end several times. 

The scoring started early in the 
first quarter when Sermon recovered 
a fumble on Massachusetts 35 yard 
line and ran to the *20 yard mark be- 
fore he was pulled down. Then an 
eight yard gain, several line plunges 
and a penalty put the ball ou the five 
yard line and Sermou scored. At 
the kickoff the .tail went over the 
goal line, being put Into play at the 
20 mark. Straight, close football 
netted 23 yards for M. A. C. when a 
forward 1'abner to Darling gave 25 
yards more. The period ended with 
the ball on the Springfield 24 yard 
line. 

In the second period the pig skin 
was pushed to Springfield's six yard 
marker where they held for downs. 
Miller punted out to the forty line. 
Three line plays by Aggie were fol- 
lowed bv a drop kick l»v Palmer that 
Stiue blocked resulting in fifteen yaid 
loss. Line plunges and end runs 
brought the ball back almost to the Y. 
U. C. A line and they again held. 
Miller punted to the middle of the 
field. Palmer passed to tlrayson for 
twenty yards, Massachusetts was pen- 
alized fifteen yards for holding and 
Palmer kicked. Miller took the ball, 
heaved a forward to Sermon and the 
longest gain of the day was started. 
Sermon taking the ball at the twenty 
yard mark carried it to the Aggie 
thirty-two line, a fifty-eight yard ad- 
vnuce. Then a play around the end 
together with a penalty and a pasa, 
Sermon to Miller, counted another 
touchdown. Sermon kicked the goal. 
In the third quarter Aggie came 
back strong. 

At the kick off Palmer received 
at the five yard line running it 
back twenty yards when he was pulled 
down. Dai ling around the end 
gained seven yards and then there 
was a penalty of five. Palmer punted 
to the forty yard lino and a fumble 
again put the ball in the possession 
of the Aggie eleven. Palmer punted 
to the goal line awl the play began at 
the twenty Hoe. Curran planted 
hiroaelf in front of a Springfield pa§a 
and nine plays carried the ball across 
the line for Aggie's first score. 
Palmer kicked the goal. 

The final period opened with the 
ball in Springfirld's possession at the 
MassacliuseHs* forty yard marker. 
Perry intercepted a paw from Milter 




Skkmon Thrown kob a Loss 



on the thirty-five yard line. Here the 
Brides men uncorked a series of for- 
ward passes that brought the stands 
to their feet, the ball being worked to 
the four yard line in ten plays. Then 
Springfield held for downs and Miller 
punted out forty yards When the 
ball again started back to Spring- 
field's goal. A pass from Palmer to 
Darling with Darling standing almost 
on the goal line registered the second 
score and Palmer kicked the goal. 
The remainder of the game the ball 
was in Springfield's hands in her own 

territory. 

For those that watched the game 
there was little doubt that the best 
team won, the Springfield men being 
out rushed throughout the game and 
outgeneraled on their own famous for- 
ward pass. Springfield played a 
hard, fast game but M, A. C. played 



RIFLE PRACTICE TO BE 

HELD FOR ALL STUDENTS 

Sergeant Smart detailed to M.A.C. to 
Help in Shooting, 

Sergeant Smart of theU. S. Army 
has recently been detailed for work 
in the military department of this 
college. His main duty will be the 
development of rifle shooting among 
the student body as a whole. The 
aim of the department is to acquaint 
every studeut with a rifle so that he 
will be able to use it effectively ,aud in 
this way to raise the standard of 
marksmanship in the college. 

The entire charge of the shooting 
on the indoor range will be in charge 
of Sergeant Smart. From now until 
Nov. 20, at which time the Sopho- 
more-Freshman match will be held, 
the gallery will be open at all hours 




SUNDAY CHAPEL 
Rev. Samuel A. Eliot, president., 
the American Unitarian Associatioi. 
was the speaker in Sunday Chapel 
Nov. II. He advised the student 
not to become too much absorbed it 
learning facts, but to use the know! 
edge gained in education in the form 
ing of ideals. He said in part : "On. 
real possession and gain in life an- 
not material, but are in the spirit and 
consist in the enlightening of the 
mind and the broadening of the heart. 
You students want the information 
that this college affordB, but you 
should also seek to acquire the mental 
power which is the will to know ami 
to think independently. luforiua- 
tion is a factor that permits us to 
succeed in business, or to sustain law, 
to hold the proper regard for our 
country and to worship the divine. 
We owe the triumphs of business 
and science to men of the visionary 
life. Patriotism is due to one men- 
tal attitude. Take away a certain 
idea of what America means, and 
you have lost your patriotism altho 
the country itself docs not change. 
It is an invisible network of love, 
fear, gratitude, and so forth which is 
woven in and thru society that makes 
law possible. There is a plain upon 
which we perform our every day 
duties; but stretching away from this 
plain iu the background there lies the 
hills of ideals and imagination. Yim 
and I must live in the foreground of 
fact, but we ought to lift up our eyes 
to the bills for that inspiration with- 
out which the work of every day life 
would soon become distasteful. 
Don't let the foiegrniiud monoi»olize 
your view. Behind a prison of toils 
and sacrifices is opening the eternal 
realms of imagination, hope ami faith. 
Before the address, James F. 
Nicholson '10, rendered a tenor solo 
A new feature of the service was the 
leading of the hymns by the Glee Chit' 
from the platform. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday. Nov. 16, 191 5. 



Dahliko Uaisiko oh Esd Rjk 



a better one and justly deserved every 
point that she gained. 

Summary : 
m X— \< 111 skt». srm.v«)KiKi,i». 

(iruvson, le re, KlUarltajc, Burahan 



Hai-t.'.l. II 

Jordan, Ik 
Parry, <■ 

Dun o. m 
Holmes, rt 

!»av, UU'lutnUoii 
Palmer, <|l> 
Curran, lhb 
Darling. Hole*. rhl> 
We«>k«, fa 
man— Agffie 14, 



rl, Yeoman 

ru. \\>ber 

«•, Marvlll 

In, Joaaaoa, Stlae 

It, st i ne, shea 

le, Kindle 

.,!,, Miller 

rhb, iSermnn 

I hit, Kvans 

fb, Cooper 



Springfield IS. 
Tumhdowns— DarlingS. Sirm.in, Miller. 
Qoals from loiu-hdowns- Palmer 2, s«i 
mm, lieferee- <Hr|ientBr of Uarvard, 
Pmpire-Kllpatnekuf Princeton. Head 
HniHunati -Hubbard of Amherst Time 
LB Blasts periods. 



Fred I*, Sampson of Fall 
has pledged Commons Club. 



linn 



of the day for tny one who cares to 
practice. Candidates for the two 
class teams and for the varsity will 
be ex|>ected to do consistent practic- 
ing during that time. Sergeant Smart 
will be in charge of the gallery from 
8to 12 a.m. and 1 to 3 P. M every- 
day. Mi tubers of last year's varsity 
will be in charge from 3 to 5 v. m . 
everv dnv. 

After Nov. 20, a few hoars every 
day will be set aside for the exclu- 
sive use of the rifle team. During 
these hours picked men from thoae 
taking general practice will be al- 
lowed to practice with the varsity. 

This new idea of having rifle prac- 
tice for all is a good one, for besides 
raising the standard of marksman- 
ship in the college as a whole it 
should raise the standard of the association of Official Agriculi 
varsity by throwing light upon new Chemists will be in session at 
material for the team. time. 



LE CERCLE FRANCIES 

ORGANIZES FOR YEAR 
The first meeting of **Le Cerde 
Francais" was held last Wednesday 
evening, The program for the com- 
ing year, which was arranged last 
year, was discussed, and the prepar- 
ing of a short pa per, to be read at 
the next meeting, was assigned to 
one of the members. The next meet- 
ing comes on Wednesday, Nov. 17, 
and it \n urged that all members ht 
present, as the officers for the coin- 
ing year are to he chosen. A - 
dial welcome is given to all Fi* 
men who have bad at least on* y»» r 
of French, 

WASHINGTON M. A. C, CLUB 

The semi-annnal dinner of the «» 
A. C. clnb of Washington will 
held at the New Kbbitt hotel, cor r 
14th and F Sts., Tuesday even 
Nov. 10, The annual meeting of 



a 



GRAYSON CHOSEN CAPTAIN 

[Continued fniin twige l] 



As a nucleus for nest year's team 
Captain Grayson will have four 
veterans of this season's stellar aggre- 




CAinfAia Graysos 

gntion. Day. Dunn and Grayson are 
left of the line and Weeks is left in 
the backfield. Holes, Holmes and 
Uichardson played in the Springfield 
game and are possibilities. Higgin- 
hotham and Kd wards have played CM 
the varsity and will I* candidates 
next year. Of the scrubs there are 
Sa titer and McKee as ends, Capet 
and Spaulding as tackles. Roberts, 




there are Rostrom, Dillon, F. Gray- 
son, Sedgwick, Moynihan and Jack- 
son besides a large number of fresh- 
men. 

On the whole it looks as if Captain 
Grayson has a pretty strong nucleus 
to work with next year. 

STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

Mr. Lunn of the extension depart- 
ment and Charles Gould '16 gave 
very interesting talks before the 
Stockbridge club, Tuesday evening. 
Mr. Lunn discussed to some extent 
the subject of poultry husbandry, 
outlining at the same lime the work 
of his department along this line of 
work. Gould, who has just returned 
from a year's study at the University 
of Texas, spoke on "Agriculture in 
Texas." At the close of the lecture 
President Taber announced that Her- 
bert (ollingwood,editor of the Rural 
Jfew Yorker would address the club 
at an earlv date. 



MOTION PICTURES FRIDAY 

IN THE AUDITORIUM 

Motion pictures each week during 
the winter in the Stockbridge audi- 
torium are to be given under the aus- 
pices of the Social I'uion Committee. 
The first of the series comes Friday 
evening at ft-80 The highest grade 
of pictures will be shown, ami a 
varied program is promised. Tin* 
committee has undertaken this pro- 
ject not with the idea of competing 
with any local theaters, but foi the 
purpose of giving the students ■ 
regular entertainment where the best 
films may be seen. In order tocover 
the cotisideialile cost involved then- 
will be an admission charge of ten 
cents to students, and twenty cents 
to others. 

Friday night the entertainment 
will consist of the following : "The 
Dollar Mark," a five reel featuic; 
"Two of the Finest" and "The Vau- 
derbilt Cup Race." 

i he principal features of (he Social 
Union program for the coming win- 
ter are : Freshman night, No*. SO; 
Krncst Gamble Concert party, I 
4 ; Judge Men Limlscy, .Inn. h ; Fac- 
ulty Kutertaiument. .Ian -'•.' ; Student 
Vaudeville (pending) Feb. tt\ La* 
land Powers, March 1H, 

It has been decided to charge an 

admission fat of 60 cents for each of 

these entertainments to those not 
holding n season ticket. Season 
tickets, which will admit the pur- 
chaser to all Social I nioii functions, 
will Iw issued to the olljcers of the 
institution and their families | the 
price of the tickets will be tl for an 
individual Tickets admitting all 
members of a family may be pur- 
chased for $2. .*•(). 



FLEMINGS SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN 6 DYER, Props. 

Loose-Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
-Pens- 



Makaokr Holokw 



*!.*».— Robert T. Frost has joined 
with llasey *l-> and they are running 
their own business of tree doctoring 
and spraying under the firm nnme of 
llasey & Frost with headquarters st 



ONE 



YEARS SUPPLY 
OF MAGAZINES 



10c 



An Especially Oooil Commission Proposition— 

Cash for test "iirdns— Article widely Aavtrtistd— 
Cuts down exiense in |u>w«'r i Ipnts— Address 
Rni.inrrkim, Si'Peis Co., itfi N. Qth Htieet, 
Philadelphia. Fa. 

The Holyoke Valve I Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers nf Wrought Iron and Brass I'ipr. Valves 
iitd fittings fie ."steam. Water and Ga*. AsbeMos 
and Magnesia Roller and fine Coverings, l'i|e 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supi lies. Engii eeis and 
Contractors (or Steam and Hot Wstti-i Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Fngi> e 
Connections. Holyoke, Man. 

BBCKMAN'8 

Candies and Ice Cream 



** II AMI' •* 



DO YOU KNOW "'■" "'""ir" 1 * ,,r 1'iiidisiifiH 

i#u ivu ixmiff ^duu I,,, kumi uwmjihI you ■ 
free anmple ropy of their Mami/lnr If tlo-v only 
knew your aihln-ss'.' It I* oar business to lm 

iM publisher)* onlj with the names of intelli- 
gent nmtfuxlnc road a re. " you will wots your 
full address VERY plain and Mad us ONLY 10 
cents 'In silver or mi<uu-> order we will Henri 
nun iiiiine to several hundred publisher* within 
h year, who will send you FREE sample copies 
of hundreds 'yes.sever.il hundreds of the lead 
ing Standard Hgggitnoi farm Paper*, poultry 
Journals, Story Maga/ines. Hr\ lews and Weekij 
Papers, Mall Order and Trade I'uhllcations. 
Housekeeping Magazines. Fashion Journals, 
Illustrated Magazines anil in fact atmut all 
kinds of high-giade Intei't-ntliitt tuiiga'/iiies com- 
ing to you In most even mail for over a jr.ir, 
ami all for ONLY 10 cents in silver). 

WE-DO-AS-WE-SAY 

so send a silver dime at once and your mime 
will go on our ne\! month's circulating list and 
you will lie greatly surprised at the results, as 
we assure you that you will lie mote than well 
pleased with the small Investment. And you 
WILL NEVER regret It. Address the MacudtM 
< in iiiating < o., Hon natti, Boston. u.B. A < n 
■ ill. it ing Oept. into. DON'T fall to Mtltc YOUR 
full address EXTRA plain. We have something 
in »!.ue tin sou as a real siupilsc If yuu will 
please let us know In what impel yon saw this 
advertisement. 



" BIDE-A-WEE 



yy 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty — And other faod things to eat. 

MRS. L. M. STEBBIN5, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. 

Tel. 4IJ-W 

DR. R. C. BANGS 

Dentist 
NASH'S BLOCK 

Evenings hy Appoint meat, 



hotel Ularrcn 

South Decrtield, Mass. 

T. si. AHERN, MANAGER 



7J f Q t' are supplied every year 

Dlirpee S lj6e(lS l^t, more Anri 
» can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality ** Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914^ — a bright new book of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE k CO., Burpee Buildings, Philad. 



lelphia 



Page** 8hoe Store 



SPECIAL NOTICE 



Big surprise for M. A. C. rm-n al our store ! 

Don't buy Footwear till you see us 

■VIC 1 »,\ I MI VC4 — I)oub!e-wr«r Lejilter used. 



School and College Photographers 




LOCALLY: 5a Center St., Northampton Mass., 

and South Hadley, N » 

Thene ?i lad tot offer ihr ben *ktlUi 



Main Orric*! 

1546 154S Broadway, 

New York City 



arttRta awl moM rnmpl-te 

equtpme ni r.i>tain.»l.|» 



'•tick and Buttriek are left for Ibe Brockton. Addrras, Froat, Cart of 
•nttr of Uit line. la the backfield y, U. C A M Brockton. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



•DRAI.KRS IN 











Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. i6, 1915 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 191 5. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 



BOABD <>K KDITOBS, 



TYLEK & BOOKBS IS, 
IUCIIAHO W. SMITH '17. 
FRANK J. m'MKIKKI.K'lfi, 
THOS. I.. HARIUMKWIH, 
ALKKKO A.UIOIOSA 'IB. 
DWIOHTK. HARNKS It, 
MILKOK1) R. UWIIKM K *1T 



Kdltor-in-Cblef 

MaiutKinu Editor 

AHNlNtant Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Athletic Kdltor 

Alumni Kdltor 

N«W8 Kdltor 



1 



ELLIOT HENDERSON '17. I»ci*rtment Kdltor 
WILLIAM SAVILLK. JR. '17, CaiupUH Kdltor 
MARSHAI.I. t). LAN PH EAR Ms, Awmi'h Kdltur 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

('HAS. A. IIUNTINOTUS. JR. 'l«i. 

Huainewi Munuuer 
MKRR1I.L I'. WAKNkIC '17, 

Assistant Cumiu-si Manager 
LK8TKR K. KIKLlMMi '»«, 

Advert Ihlnn Maiiatct-r 
JAMKS C. I-OWKLL 'Is. flrculatlon 



Subscription H-X.M) per year. Single 
copies, 6 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to I'll Alii. K8 A. Ill NTINfiTON, J I:. 

Kntcrcdaasecond-iliiH!* matter at tin- AiiiIhthI 
I'oat Oltlce. 

Vol. XXVI. Tuesday, Nov. 16. No. 9 

The awarding of a letter to Dr. 
Brides, coach of the football team, is 
a well deserved recognition of his 
services to the college through its 
athletics. The thorough hard work 
that he lias performed for the last 
several years has culminated iu pro- 
ducing the finest team the college has 
sent out for many years. It is most 
earnestly tola- hoped that Dr. Brides 
may be secured for the coming years. 



The football reason just ended waa 
highly satisfactory to every Bup|H>rter 
of the college. The coach, the cap- 
tain, and the team deserve a very 
great ileal of credit for their work. 
In the excitement of the last victory 
however, the men who gave the varsity 
team their practise should not be 
overlooked. The substitutes on the 
second and third teams worked as 
hard as the first string men, and in 
their way, did as much to make the 
season successful. It is noted with 
pleasure that recognition of this fact 
was made in the awarding of letters 
at the cod of the season. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

I Nolier* f (If t lll» •'ollillill nhiMiliI |m> iltiipftftl In 

In thi?*'«»i.i foi \n ti*lr»«*r tawtart t« William 

X»vIIp, Jr. lIoBat tl»f™r* !lN»!*»tiirfB!r tmwad* 
tnc Mrh |MIH>.1 



Wn»N'KKl«AY. Nov, 17, 

I Hi i-. «,— Assembly. Mr. William 0, 
Hrown, former President Ifew 
York retilral Railroad. 

<HRl p. ii»— -K<*«itnetiin! Parade reviewed 
by President Huttertleld. 

rLW v, m, l,e (crcle Kraneats. 

fUSt) r, M.— ' otinly bite Club, I'r.if, 
HecBf, Kxtsnston Department. 

•i-au p. *»,— Debmina flub. 

7-00 r, m.— L*wi*Mp** Art flub, French 
Hall. 

Tiiibhoay, Sn\. in. 
6-30 p, x.— Christian Association la 
Chapel, Pmf. liram, Smith 



Sr.Mi.vv, Nov. 21. 

9-10 a. M, - .Sunday Chapel, Kev. Albert 
I*. Fitch, Andover Theologi- 
cal .School, < 'ainlu'idiit'. 

Tuesday, Nov. 22. 

0-45 p. M.— Glee t'lul) Ueliearsal. 
Wkoxksoa v, Nov. SB, 
— Thanksgiving, recess begins, 
si,- Special train leaves C, V. 
Station arriving In Boston at 
•4-1H v. M. 
Monoav, Nov. IB, 

m. — Thanksgiving recess ends. 
Regular schedule of classes. 



J I'll M 

i-:to i' 



l-io I- 



CAMPOS NOTES 

"Pete" Mahoney ex-*16, was a 
visitor on the campus last week end. 

• • • 

George N. Schlough of Waltham 
has been elected manager of the 
Sophomore Rifle team for the com- 
ing season. 

• ♦ • 

Captain Croft - of the -'nth U. S. 
Infantry spoke to the class in Soph- 
omore tactics at the regular period 
last Thursday. He chose the very 
interesting subject of "Rear Guards" 
and related some of his own experi- 
ences along that line. 

• • « 

The following men have been 
awarded their 11*18 numerals: Foot- 
ball — Grayson, Jackson, Sedgwick. 
Moynihnn, Boyd, Roberts, Spauld- 
ing, Holmes, McKee, Richardson, 
Buck and Bainbridge, manager ; Base- 
ball— Burtch, Chambers, Gasser, 
Holmes, Grayson, Johnson, Haginnis, 
Richardson, Vesair and Foley, man- 
ager ; Rope Pull — Boyd, Lor i tig, 
Buchanan. Goodridge, Scavey, Wil- 
bur and Ferris, manager ; Cross 
Countrv — Lyons. Contrary to the 
custom last vear, these men will not 
be given certificates. 



LYMAN ABBOTT SPEAKS 

AT WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

l< 'ununited from \tiiw 1] 



Friday, Nov. IU. 
tMO r, «,— Moving Pictures in Audi- 
tortura. 



< ism through the press and other pub- 
lic agents ! Christ said be came to 
si'i free all those wlio are braised by 
oppression. The American colonies 
were to Kn gland as "an ill cared for 
cow to be milked but not fed." We 
fought the Revolution. The slaves 
were at* free after four years of 
bloody civil war. For one hand red 
years our neighbor Cuba was under 
oppression, We gained Cuba in the 
Spanish- American war and gave it 
back to the Cubans. Christ by 
physical force drove the montv 
changers from the temple and re- 
dedicated it to God's service. All 
reforms need a war for one kind or 
another. 

We should set I William of Or- 
ange, Oliver Cromwell, George 
Washington, are names written in 
blood and Are on the scroll of Time 
as heroes who offered their lives for 
a common good. How much belter 
It is to fight, even for a mistaken 
cause, than to sit back with folded 
arms and watch the great struggle of 
Humanity go on ! 



NINETEEN THIRTEEN NOTES 

Burby is now managing a poultry 
farm in Ware, Mass. 

Coleman writes that he is doing 
general allround work at Brill Farm, 
Home of World's Champion Holstein 
Cattle, Stewartsville, N. J., and get- 
ting some good old pointers on the 
Holstein game. 

The following "1918** men were 
at the Springfield game and attended 
the "1913 Get-together" after the 
game at The Highland : Grigges, 
Zabriskie, Cole, Barstow, Adams, 
Clark, Headle M. and Headle H., 
Harris, Fay, Macone, Serex and 
Roehrs. "Doc" and Marshall 
Headle bad charge of the affair and 
after the feed "1913" held down a 
box at Polis. 

The following letter from a 1913 
man (which was also accompanied 
by his third contribution for the 
field) gives an idea of the interest 
taken bv some of the old codgers in 
the field. " Enclosed find check to 
add to the '13 pile for the athletic 
field. The boys ought to reach the 
11000 mark this fall with a football 
team on the field such as we have to 
get up their spirit." How about it, 
1913? Who is the next to send in a 
wee bit? 



The Survival 
of the Fittest 




Tried in the furnace of competition 
and tested on nearly 2,000000 (arms 
the world over, the De Laval has 
proved its superiority to all other 
cream separators. 

Think of all the separators you used 
to see advertised so extravagantly. 
Where are they now? Why do you 
seldom, if at all, see their names men- 
tioned ? Simply because the fittest 
must survive and the others must fall 
out of the race. 

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 



iBBfosfJwM NtwYortt 

we, 



■m.. rhlcngo 



Stbphkm Lank F0L8BH 

MAMfWiTCRINK JKWKI.I I' 



1 h. » iiKDA UW A Y. 



»BW YUKK 



THE VALUE OF YOUR COLLEGE 
EDUCATION 

will not be measured by the few 
things that you arc going to re- 
member, but rather by a know! 
edge of how and where to obtain 
information as you need it. This 
means that you will need 

A CERTAIN FEW REFERENCE BOOKS 

We have them on our shelves at 
85 Pleasant Street 



I'l.Uii AlufU CXILtLtRCiS 

IMNH AM) RUfQS ,* 

OOI.O. •!!.▼■* AND MWONZK HltMLB 

S. S. HYD 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 1} 1'leasant St. 
1 1. libit*' Prescriptions Filled, Hroken Leniw 
Accurately Replaced. Kifw Watch Repairing 
I'rontptlf »nd skilfully Done, 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



JOHNSON BOOK CO. 

R. A. Mooney H. W. Bishop 

CJNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St, 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

UH.M.AK SINUtV SKRVICK AT 7 I* M 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
Suits Cleaned. Pressed and Dyed. All kinds ni 
Kepairihe for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly dene. 
High-grade work by first class tailor. Work 
called tor and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing, 

4 SUITS COH $1 ,0 

GEORGE KOrOWITZ, PROP. 

Main Street, Amherst. Mass. Nash Block 
On yoor way to the Post Office. Tel. *j& W 

E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 
Lenses ground white you wait 

COLLKRB JEWRLKV 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar String! 

AMHKRST, MASS. 
Neat to Post Office. 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 

Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 
t nc 

s I-2C 

48c per doz. 
30c per do/ 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, 11.50 a Suit 



R.T. FSOiT.Agent; D. Shfrinvaw, Asst Ag#*i 
Try our ticket system 

Pat tan sane and address oa laundr \ 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

tirown by the Floricultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of • 
flowers and plants at reasonable rati- 
to students and faculty. This stw k 
is grown in modern houses undt-r 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnation*, 
violets, chrysanthemums and M 
peas in season. 

(JROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone i 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 
Oood worst speaks for It sell 
Naah Block, Amherst, M 




CAMPION 



Fine Tailoring 

COLLEGE OUTFITTER 

Ready-To-Wear Clothes 



PKEXV AMI* PltOFKSSOn Tapt. 



BIG TIME COMING AT C0PELY 

PLAZA 

The Coplev Plazn ooaoeri and 

dance is now a cfitaintv, according 

s9 the inan.-igeiiieiit of the Musical 

Cluha, Knough supjiort lia.s baaa 

giuti hv the •todentf and nlumni to 

make the evening a paving propoai* 

sad sill that in needed n >w i« t<i 

sulfleient interest ahowa to 

Mm- evening the biggest udvet- 

tisirniiit thai Aggie has ever received 

in Boston. 

In brief, here is the propoBition 

Musical Clubs offer the alumni. 

ttudenta and their friends: Dee. 

2«0i. at 8 p, m., a eoneert by the 

ned oluba will be given in one 

• w Kngland's finest hall rooms, 
ttg until 9-30, Dancing will 
n at 0-1,*) ami la»t until 2 a. m., 

the college orchestra of 10 

■* furnishing the isaate. The 

will he *1..'0 dr ?a 00 a 

f«>r the entire entertainment. 

'■ek, papers will be circulated 

management) and those who 

1 10 go Will be linked to sign, 

t lie* plan of the Musical Asso 

to make this affair a college 

nncl whether it liven or mil 

iilirelv with the men who are 

h college. Talk it over with 

friends at home and start a 

ly party. " The management 

tve the ttckets on sale In a few 

Tiny %\il! make fine ("hrlsl- 

itHcuts, especially in paiis. 

• proper support, lh< manage- 



ineut will imike ( opley PlSES an 

Aggie landinaik. He there with the 
girl from home, and show lu-r what 
the so called ** farmers " are capable 
of in the musical and social line. 






Wl'. 



n. 



re«! 
Don 

«■ t . 



NINETEEN-FIFTEEN NOTES 

Harlow L. Pendleton is now lo- 
cated at 11 West Franklin Street, 
Baltimore. Md. lie is working for 
the City Dairy Co. of Baltimore, who 
do a large wholesale and retail busi- 
ness. "Penny" is employed iu the 
ice cream department and writes that 
he is enjoying his work immensely 

Nineteen Fifteen was well repre- 
sented at the Springfield game by 30 
eiiUnisinttic rooters. The roll of 
honor include!: Alden.lhMuis.lirooks, 
Buell, Clark, Cleveland, Day, Doran. 
Flebut. George Hall, Itod Hall, 
f lot is. Johnson.' Lane, Bovejov, 
Marsh, McKecliuie. Mclican, Mon- 
tague, Perry. Porter. Sears, Sere- 
ranee, Shin, .Spoffoul, Vinal. While, 
Wright ami Wliitinore. Most of 
these men Weill to J lie Highland 
after I lie game enjoving a u*iy 
good feed and good old fashioned 
reunion 



F. A SHERARD 

ME N'S STO RE 

Use Our New Gash Discount Card and Save Five Per Cent 

< ) N — 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brashes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 



Always glad to see yon. 




THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



('apt. Ini A. Reeves of Burlington, 
Vl,, was recently elected to thi pres- 
idency* of Norwich l*:jiver«ity, suc- 
ceeding Nelson L. Sheldon of Bos- 
ton, Mr. Sheldon has beta acting 
president since the resignation of 
President (.'. H. Spooner, 



FREE 



For a few days only here's your chance to g;ct 

FREE 

With a 90c Humidor of Tuxedo Tobacco, a 
GENUINE FRENCH BRIAR 

PIPE 

SEE THEM IN THE WINDOW 



HENRY ADAMS & 



The Kexall Store- -On the Corner 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 191 5. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 1915. 



J. GINSHURG E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

n «., Amity Street DENTAL ROOMS 

Modern Shoe Repairing W j| iiams w «sk, Amherst, Mass. 

announcing Office Hours: <j to u a. m„ 1-30 to 5 p. M. 

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Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 
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and GENTS' FURNISHINGS 



\\Y m ill call ami deliver clothe* 



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Full Dress Suts to Rent and Dress Supples 



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the most economu al you Can Hms. 

BetteR CROPS 

are the inevitable result. 




^RTILIZ^B^ 



THE ROGERS ® HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

imt«-»« mill Vtaika. I'oi-iImimI. Conn. 



Huntington Ave,, Exeter and Blagden Sts., Boston, Mas*. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the cit\. 

AMOS M. WHIPPLE, «■.«.... 



£&rp*rvter & Morchousf, 

PRINTERS, 



No. 1, Cook Place, 



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T. M. C. A. 



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Attention is again called to the fact 
that Professor (irantof Smith college 
will deliver the first of a series of 
four lectures iu the chapel, Thursday 
evening tit 6-30 F. si. The subject of 
the scries will be "OW Testament 
History Up to New Testament Times." 
Everybody out. 

Auv men who desire to do so may 
pay their pledges, in whole or in part, 
unv morning during the week at the 
Y. If. ('. A. office, Owing to the 
heavv expenses of the work this year, 
considerable money is needed during 
this semester, and consequently it is 
hoped that many of the men will be 
able to do this. 

The Association whhes to call to 
the attention of those members of the 
student body who attended the first 
Seerley lectures the pledges made al 
that time for the support of it.-, wo.ik. 
Since two or three large bills arc due 
the first of the coming month, it is 
desired that as many as possible make 
Complete or partial payments 011 them. 
The Association would like to take 
this opportunity to thank those indi- 
viduals who have contributed so 
essentially to this work. Payments 
111.1v be made during anv of the oHiee 
hours posted oil the bulletin board. 

Arrangements have been made for 
a second deputation to spend the 
coming WCek-end in the town of 
Plaiuficld. 

M. A. ('. will lie represented by 
one member of the Cabinet at an In- 
tercollegiate Deputation in llolyoke, 
to be held Dec. Kb II and 15. Other 
colleges to lie represented are Har- 
vard, Dartmouth, W 1*. 1 . ami 
Amherst. 



Now is the time to be planning for 

Fraternity Groups 



——Have them laken at 

MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 

44 State Street, 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

Announcement has just been ie- 
nerved from the Extension Depart 
meiit of the college of the appoint- 
ment of Sn inner It. Parker of Green 
field, to the position of Assistant 
Htate leader to take effect as soon 
after Dec. 1 as possible. Mr. Parker 
lakes the position left vacant by H. 
W. Kills. He now becomes the repre- 
sentative of the 1' s. Department of 
Agriculture as well as the college, 
having under his direction nil co-oper- 
ative work between these organiza- 
tions in Massachusetts, 

The college and the agiicultuial 
interests of the stHte are indeed fort- 
unate in securing Mr. Parker for this 
place. His duties in the new position 
will be hugely the co-ordinating of 
the work of the college and the IJ, H. 
Department of Agriculture with the 
work of the Farm Bureaus, County 
Agents and local sgruui turn 1 instruc- 
tors throughout the slate. 



CONCERNIMG NEEDY 
STUDENTS 

First. He is to have a sound bod 
His health should be vigorous. The 
strain to which he will subject h s 
body, and the trials which he will 
give to his health, will be heav. . 
Only a fine physical condition can 
bear up against the pressure. 

Second. The boy should have an 
adequate intellectual preparation for 
pursuing the studies of the course. 
In his endeavor to earn his way he 
will use up time and strength, which, 
if he were free from these necessities. 
he would give to his intellectual work. 
In order, therefore, for Inm to main- 
tain a good place as a student he 
should enter college, if it be possible, 
with a certain surplus of scholastic 
attainments. If a boy poor in parte 
is thinking of going to college, but 
finds himself not well prepared to 
enter, be should delay in order to 
make his preparation amply sulHcient. 
Third The be? of the tvpe vbo 
is coming to college should be a boy 
of facility in doing things. He 
should be, to use a most convenient 
epithet, handy. He should have KB 
instinct for work, for finding it, and 
for doing it. 

Fourth. The element of handling 
has close relation to another neces- 
sary element — faithfulness The in- 
stinct to dutv should be strong. 
Whatever task is given he should per- 
form with both honesty and honor. 
He should seek not only to do Ins 
dutv, but more than bis dutv. IU' 
■.hoiild earn more than he receives; 
give in service for more than he gets 
iu pay. 

Fijth. Moreover, the boy should, 
of course, possess a sound character. 
The cardinal virtues should indeed be 
cardinal in his constitution. Justice, 
temperance, forbearunce, benevo- 
lences, should represent the peal 
square of his character. Any ethical 
weakness, however slight, may prove 
serious. 

Sixth. In the last place, the bov 
who is working his way through col 
lege must possess the elements of 
pluck, patience, and perthltrOOf 
His will must be strong, He i« i> 
grave j>eril of becoming tired and m 
giving up the struggle. 

The struggle is long and haul. 
He will need his second wind, b» 
third wind. 



'1.V— (icorgeM. IUIHh with the 

Sheffield Farm Milk Co, iu charge of 

Northampton, Mass their laboratory located in the (at- 

tkllls at Hobart. N. Y 



(•!- 



BOOKS FOR THE FARMER FROM 

THE FARMER'S OWN 

COLLEGE 

The "travelling library" ii «e 
phase of the extension work of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural Coll. gf- 
Special efforts are made to eo-< 
ate with those local libraries 1 
are not overtnpplied with boo 
with fundi, and especially 
which are located in farming 
rniinilien. The plan is to send 
upon request, small collection 
bouks or "travelling libraries," 
agriculture »d related 



• se to be circulated by and from 
local library. Special collee- 
ns, or " libraries," are bIbo loaned 
this manner, covering definite 
I ibleras such as: Harvesting and 
uketing of crops, Poultry, Farm- 
' co-operative organizations, Seed 
etion and testing, Vegetable 

dening, Fruit growing, etc. All 
;, iilications from local libraries, in 
•0 far as books and funds will per- 

. will be granted. The librarian 

1 .-xpected to notify the townspeople 
in general and the various agricul- 
tural organizations in the town when 
these books are available. These 
collections are loaned for varying 
length! of time, according to the ex- 
tent to which they are used and the 
demand for them from other sources. 
Aldress. Charles R, Green, Librarian, 
M. A. C, Amherst, Mass., in re- 
eard to this work. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

ex-*72. John M. Lot* key who at- 
tended college from 1868 to 1870 in 
the class of 1872, died Sept. 28, in 
Leominster, Mass. Mr. Lockey was 
horn in Roxbury, March 8, 1HA0, but 
went to Leominster when a young 
hoy. He was in the insurance busi- 
ness for many years and at the time 
of his death was president of the J. 
H, Lockey Piano Case Co. He was 
a member of the Leominster Club ; 
the Monoosuvek Country ( lub, and 
the Unitarian Club. In his business 
iiiliiitions he was a director of the 
Kitchhurg Mutual Fire Insurance Co., 
a director of the Leominster Na- 
tional Bank, and a trustee of the 
Ixiitiinister Savings Bank. He leaves 
t wife and two daughter 

m._C. P. Lounsbury is the first 
alumnus to become a Life Member 
of die Associate Alumni. Louns- 
bury bails from South Africa, but 
there is still a chance for those at 
some. 

'<>".— J. F. Eastman is the author 
of "Soils Laborator Note Book,*' 
«liie|| is published by J. B. Llp- 
l^neott & Company of Philadel- 
phia, This manual is excellently ar- 
ranged, and designed to aid in the 
•tody of soil physics for both ele- 
mentary and advanced men. It is 
almost the latest word on the subject 
ati.I Professor Kastmau deserves 
•ohirratulations for the efficient way 
io which he handled It. 

• —The farm buildings owned 
hy It, J. MooGovm & Son were de- 
stroyed by fire on the morning of 
ft m, The fire which started in 
tbi ,arn had gained such headway 
htf'tft It was discovered that it wa« 
l " ^sible to save anv of the stock, 

¥ 

N teen cows and heifers, a pure 
! bull, were lost together with 
voi k horses and three bogs. The 
loss is estimated at IdOOO and : 
rtially covered by insurance, 
uiise is unknown but is thought 
spontaneous combustion in sec- 
rop clover. 



'10. — K. F. Damon as manager 
and secretary of the Villa Park Orch- 
ard Association of Villa Park, Cal., 
recently published a report of the 
organization that showed a favorable 
balance, and a thriving condition 
under his management. An interest- 
ing item in the report is that in the 
year ending Aug. 31, 19M the pack- 
ing expense, including operating, 
administration, picking and hauling 
totaled .11-1 plus a depreciation of 
AM brought the total to .4. 'J*. 

'12 — K. N. Hallowell, of the land- 
scape course, is now engaged in bus- 
iness with the Itied-Whitcomb Com- 
pany of Boston, who are contractors, 
designers and builders, and able to 
do all kinds of construction work. 

'12. - 77*e Journal of the Aimricnn 
SiK'li-tii ,,f Aijromimy for October 
contains an article by H. A. Noves 
on "Soil Sampling for Bacteriologi- 
cal Analysis". A second article 
appears in the Purdue AgricitUuH$t 
on "Fertilizing for Maturity." Mr. 
Noyes recently spent several dnvs 
at the college. 

14. — Webster and Peterson are in 
California this fall at the Imposition. 
They expect to return Fast about 
Thanksgiving. 

'1/i. — Kldon S. Mobcrg is getting 
actual experience in preparation for 
teaching, at Stauiiox Farm, Sher- 
borne. 



- 
is 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

Arkansas Man Wins Prize 

It has just been announced that 
Robert Brown, a junior in the luiver- 
sily of Arkansas has bean awarded 
the annual |1W prize in the Pugsley 
Prize contest which is carried on 
under the auspices of the Lake 
Moh, ink Conference mi International 
Arbitration. 

Chimes Ring Out the Score 

At the suggestion of the president, 
the outcome of the athletic contests in 
which the Iniveisity of Washington 
participates will be heralded by the 
chimes iu the campanile. on the cam - 
pus. If the varsity is victorious, 
"Alma Muter" will be ployed by Wal- 
ter Williams, ringer of the chimes 
Then he will indicate the score by 
tolling Washington's score on the low 
toned bell and the enemy's score on 
the high. "Home, Sweet Home," was 
judged fitting to dissolve the under- 
grads in tears iu the events of defeat, 
The university district got its first 
word of the result of the Gonzaga 
game through the chimes. 

Betting Against Their College 

Seven undergraduates at Williams 
college were found to have bet their 
money on Trinity in a recent foot- 
ball game. In a stiong editorial, the 
WUUnmx Heoord roundly condemns 
such two-faced conduct, and threat- 
ens to publish the mimes of the of- 
fenders if such a flagrant breach of 
college loyalty is committed again. 



COME OVER 
LET'S GET 
ACQUAINTED 




We are ready to show you everything that the college man 



needs For comfort in the way of clothes, lieu- an* a few 

emembe 
every case the best of their kind. 



ol our many ofierincs, and remember they are in 



Hart Schaffner & Marx Ready Clothes 

In just the styles you're looking for — Four other good makes. 

MACKINAWS FROM $5 UP 

See the famous Patrick line before you get yours. 
We'll tave you money. 

The Oakes Sweater is the best made at any price. 
the: prices are from $5 to *t 

Absolutely pure wool and made to wear. 

COMPLETE LINES CF SOFT HATS AND CAPS IN THE LATEST SHAPES AND COLORINGS 



Exclusive Custom Tailoring at Pair Price* 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



r. 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 



"N 



1857 



THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD 
FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS 



1915 



Your Opportunity 

The editor el one of our leading agricul- 
tural papen writes us under dale of January 
12th, 1915, as follows :- 

"1 am doing all 1 can to induce farmers to 
plant grain crops this year. 

"Grain is very high and it is going higher. 
Wheat is going to $2.00 per bushel and other 
grains will share in the advance. Wheat costs 
$2.50 per 100 pounds now, and pound for 
pound oats cent as much. 

"It .'eems to me that the eastern farmer's 
salvation is to bay plant food and grow 
CORN, WHEAT, BARLEY, 
OATS AND BUCKWHEAT 

"Last fall S doubled my acreage of winler 
wheal and this spring 1 shall triple the acreage 
of oats. 1 managed to produce 40 bushel* 
of wheat to the acre, and sold the straw at 
$1 7.00 per ton in the ban.** 

THE OPPORTUNITY IS YOURS! 
Br aura t ha i yea buy 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

They are available plant foods that more than mart me most 
exacting requiremenu, giving plump, sound, full heads of grain and vigor- 
ous, healthy straw. 

Eastern users of E. Frank Coe Fertilizers are* raising 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre. The average for the United Sales for three years 
is 1 4 in bushels to the acre. 

THE OPPORTUNITY IS YOURS ! WILL YOU MAKE THE MOST OP FT f 






The Coe-Mortimer Company, SI Chambers St, N, Y, 




I 

LI 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. i6, 191$. 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located over \>vsl nllice. V. p PR* Flight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

I .iuei !*J J icktt System I el. 36-M 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday from 7-12. On yuur way to P.O. 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillm.m and ISarnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, u a modern hos- 
telry run on the European flan. It l* just a step 
from Main ,->ireet, away trom the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hut and cold iuiuiiiik 
water in every room. Prices VI and up; room* 
with bath (single) aU.SO and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dimnK 
100111 makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the Highest quality, well cooked and 
servod in tin? best possiole manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying theie again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College F0UNTAIN PENS 



Offers courses of instruction in twenty-seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science* 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Moore's Swam 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select fr< 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



MllchlHIKl Hot. 1. 



Sprliiglii'M. 




RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AMD 

CARPET ROOMS 

E, D. MARSH ESTATE 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



OUR RULE 

"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 




COX SONS 

— AND — 

VINING 

71-74 Madison Avenue. New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

37 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass, 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

CU$«i tmh from r A. M. to 4 A. M 

RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton. MaMachutetu 

TWO SLOCKS FMO»t THI DEPOT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with- 
out extravagance.) More popular 
than ever. 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee 00 lutcreollegiate Athletics. 

M. A. C Athletic Kie'd Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association . 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Kitle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

C. A. Peten, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 

c. s. Hicks, Treasurer 

S. W. Hall, l'tesideut 

('. W. Moses, Manager 

A. \V. Spauldiug, .Manager 

I). A. Kicker, Mauager 

C. A. Huntington, Jr., Manager 

Mooihouse, Manager 

H. Aiken, President 

J. T. Nicholson, Mauager 

F. A. Anderson, Mauager 

L. E. Fielding, Mauager 

F. W. Mayo, Mauager 

A. J. Hicks, Pres i de nt 

E. L. King, President 

C. H. Gould, President 

It. F. Taber, President 



mtkhkbuu hook ag«kts, 

lloth mom, foi bast teller pablUhed Pankafu* 

and outfit In-'- 
OKO. W. M»1KK*. I--. St, Anaii*!!"*-. n» 

COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
slate outside of Boston. 

MODERN REPAIR OSTPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave AOOIE COLLEQE for HOL- 
YOKE at 15 min. past the hour. 



There Are SeT?n<; -od < n »ni why youshould 
lm> JOUt 

COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



Stationery, Newspapers 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



CARS 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Woody Brook battle ground 
to Old iJeerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Milters Falls. 

SO Miles of Trackage - Hodern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System -Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 min. past the hoar. 

Special Car* at Reasonable Bate* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. UK. CO 



ta-ap. m. 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

A U Carte Service 
Fma.*Mft»fl P.M. 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufactureri of 

UN I FORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of *' Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1404-1426 Chestnut SU FhU.Mie.phim. Pa. 



1 11 1 TtCfet*a» , V t*.A,I*t.oW 

♦ 1. .tii-inu l»rra»lnsj Krpairln* 

ohm kot !»«.rvl<». Bent Work, L«w«-*l *"" 

All woik carefully done. Work tilled !<i »»d 
delivered. Oents' overcoats, i«it», pwi* *» 
coats. Ladies' Hne linen suit, a aptcialty 
Teams will call ever? day at M. A. C 

W.M.. f-KAMll.l.V l'"l' 
Raw Nash Bl'k, Amherst. TelN |*N 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Co. 

616 Chattnot St., Philadelphi* 

Jewelers and Silversmith!, 

Diamond Merchants. • 

Phlladilplli's OfflcUl Frittrim Mr 

SPBOIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, No « e » 

Rings, Charm* ...... Prises Tr< W*» 

Medals ...... College Pins, Fobs, «*" 

Rings, Charms 




i% 



SIM 



Vol. XXVI. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 2$, 1 q 1 5. 



No. jo 



AMERICAN PUBUC LACKS 

POWER OF IMAGINATION 

Dr. Fitch Charges Men to Realize the 

Present Crisis and Help Solve the 

Problems Arising from It. 

Rev. Albert P. Fitch, president of 
the Andover Theological Seminary of 
Cambridge, Mass., spoke to the stu- 
dent body in Sunday Chapel on the 
subject " America and the Future." 
He said in part : 

11 The scripture teaches us prepar- 
edness as it was uttered to teach the 
men of Christ's generation to be on 
the outlook for sudden and extreme 
changes in the social on lei of the 
day. 

••You men stand in a position 
similar to that of the disciples, but 
your age will lie more rapid and 
radical in its changes. At preseui. 
we see much of modern civilization 
1'i'ing ruthlessly destroyed, immense 
MM of money being spent, aud 
human life being needlessly wasted. 
Ibis is of immense siguifieuuee as 
the fabric of civilization cannot lie 
destroyed and the blood of men 
cannot be poured out without causing 
prodigious effects to follow. You 
young men will lie in the world when 
these effects will l>egin to show them 
■elves. 

It would be folly to think that thin 
war Is going to subside and leave 
conditions as they are today be- 
tween Labor and Capital. The men 
fbo conn- out of the trenches will 
nd their means of living destroyed 
lad the enormous debt of war BOOS 
Inir shoulders; thus they will llud a 
I'laetieally intolerable existence. It 
I ■ iitain that when the war is over 
there is going to be a profound new 
1 "«ver brought to bear upon the 

Mistrial and economic situations of 
' •■ country and you vouug men will 

* 7 a? sr O 

baft to face the solution of these 
|i iblems. It is your duty to pre- 
|><re for a leadership that will be wise 
ti 1 constructive bat at the same time 
1 iical in its measures. 

•There are twn methods of govern- 
ment at present, the aristocratic 
| i-rnmetit which is based on the 
lunlitv of the race, and democratic 
• TiiniHiit which contains as the 
u erlying principle the ideals of 
1 igion. Democracy at present 
- ms to be a government of the few 
1 tit. by the many and unfit, but 
ierneath is the ideal that men will 
ae day be able to govern them- 

i< DntlnufU on pas, tj 



FOOTBALL SEASON JUST DR. COLLINGWOOD TO SPEAK 

CLOSED BEST IN YEARS BEFORE STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 



Victory Over Springfield and Tie with 

Tufts Give Team Record to 

be Proud of. 

When the Aggie team downed 
Springfield, 14-13, for the first time 
since 1907, there ended one of the 
most successful football Beasons that 
M. A. C. ever had. Only Dartmouth 
and Harvard were able to take the 
measure of this year's fast and heavy 
eleven, which has finished its work 
with a record of 118 points to its 
opponents' 54, The old "come- 
back" spirit asserted itself as never 
before this year and brought out a tie 
with Tufts after almost certain defeat 
and two weeks later repeated the 
Hick liv overcoming a IS point lead 
against (he Y. M. C. A. men. 

Starting olT the hardest schedule 
that Aggie ever had was the game 
with Dartmouth, in which the Maroon 
went down, 13-0, before the longer 
practiced Hanover men. After 
another week's practice the team met 
Harvard, now celebrating a 41-0 1 
victory over Yale. Seven points 
snatched in the last two minutes 
of play was all that the Crimson 
was able to do against the team 
from M. A. C. 

In the first game to be played on 
Alumni Field, Colby was easily van- 
quished to the tune of 26-0, more; 
than making up for Aggie's defeat at 
Portland last year. 

Holy Cross, the following week, 
pulled out with a 7-7 tie, but die 
■Con is no indication of the way in , 
which the Aygit* team outplayed the' 
Worcester men at every stage of lift 
game. Worcester Tech was an ens\ 
mark, and went down before the 
Aggie attack 27-0. This victory 
gave added confidence for the big 
game with Tufts and the Aggie team] 
was eqnal to tin- occasion, ending the 
contest in a tie. Middlebury was 
literally walked over on Alumni Field 
the following week, and had hard 
work to hold M. A. C. to in points. 
Then to wind up the season in the 
best game of the year, the Aggie boyl 
outplayed Springfield at her own 
tricks and came out on the big end of 
the ■core. This victory alone would 
make a successful season. 

Aggie has been fortunate in having 
for a coach a man like Dr. Brides, 
who has worked hard for four yean 
and at last sees the results of his 



Editor of the Rural New Yorker, He 
is One of the Foremost Agricul- 
turists of the Country. 

Dr. Herbert W. ColHsgWbod, Kdi- 
tor-iu-Chief of The Rural S< n- 
York i i\ will speak before the Stock- 
bridge Club on Tuesday evening, 
Dec. 7. Ills .subject is yet lo be 
announced but will probably he 
'Why I .Make the Rural Ntvo Yorker 
the Kind of a Paper It Is." Besides 
the members of the Stockbridge 
(tub. all students taking Journalism 
courses are planning to attend the 
lecture in I body. 

Dr. Colltngwood is one of the 
foremost and must influential Rflfi* 
cniturtStS of his time. A native of 
1'lymouth. hi this state, he attended 
Michigan Agricultural College, where 

he was graduated with the class of 
\hh:\. From 1883 to l- s *-"> hi was 
editor of the Southern Liventurk 

Jimriml, at Markvillc. Miss. Since 
iHM.'i he has been on the editorial 
HtatT of the fim'tt! .V<"' )'<•/■)>-• /, and 
in I'.MMl was mails edt!or-ui chief. 

The honorary degree of Doctor of 
Laws was conferred on him in I'.ior. 
by Michigan Agricultural College. 




Die. Coi.UKoWotM) 

Dr. • ollingwood Is the author of see- 

era! books dealing with problems of 
ci 1 1 jt I life, among them being, " I he 
Business Hen." -The Farmer i Gar- 
den*' and "The ( hild." His home m 
Woodcliff, New Jersey. 



[continued on pas* «1 



W. Raymond Irving of Taunton 
has been chosen captain of the 1917 
class basketball team. 



FACULTY GRANTS CHANGE 
IN EXAMINATION SYSTEM 

Passing Grade to Be Average 
of Exam and Daily Work 

NEW FOUR TERM PLAN 

To be Started Wben College Opens in 

September. Classes W ill Enter 

bttt Once a Year, hh Now. 

Announcement was made b\ Dean 
Lewis in chapel Friday morning that 
at the I'aculy meeting, held Nov. ii, 

it was voted to :neept and adopt two 

recommendation* made by the student 
Life Committee pertaining to failures 
and conditions in studies. The word 
infl of these recommendations as 
accepted m as follows : 

I. I'.uliins. If a student's term 
mark in any subject tails In-low 60 
per cent, Qf if he drops a QOUfBI 

without the consent of the Dean 1 he 

istbeiebv conditioned in that sub> 
jeci. lie shall ite debarred iiom las 
the final examination in that subject, 
aud must repeat it with the folkm 

Hiif class. 

•j, Cititiitiiiinx. It the average ol 

the term mat k and the final evamimi- 
tjuli he below 60 pel cent, the stu 

dent if. thereby condi t ion ed. 

Hotll of these aie ihatl^es t'loin 

the Otigitial requirements as found 
in the liisl !«<• rules of section tlm . 
in the Mile book issued lu the Dean's 
.illi< e :it the liegintling of the yeai 
r/lte onl\ change in the first one i-> 
the siilislilution of the Word "bnn' 
for what was fonneils ••semesb | 
I'lie second sta t«*went. however, spec - 
■ i.idical change in the method 
of ranking Rnal examinations. Up 
to this tune am -itinleiit who failed to 
secure a murk of tin per cent ut OWi 
uia Sual examination in any course 
was conditioned in that course, even 
though bis average for the semester 
m:i\ have been well np in the eight- 
lea perhaps wine he went into final. 
The new rule, which gcM'M into effce! 
lu connection with the mul year exam- 
inaiions in January, now makes it 
possible to average ihu semester's 
daily work in with tin- final exanii- 
initioti maik in determining whether 
the student mIi»II be conditioned in 
I the seinester'a work, rbe question 
| of tin- relative importance of tin* flnnl 
I and the semester's work in left eli- 

tireh to the option of the Instructor. 

"But," said Dean Lewis in explain 

lag the rules briefly, "it is only rea* 









The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 1915. 



sonable tu idppou that the examina- 
tion will Dot count more than 50 pel 
i-ent." 

Attention is called to the fact that 
this rule has nothing to do with the 
question an to whether every one shall 
he permitted to take the linals, re- 
gardleaa of the dailv work of the 
lemeeter. The rumor which DAI 
heen current for some time that no 
One would he kept out of final ex- 
aminations fiom now on is entirely 
without foundation, according to a 
Statement made by Secretary Watts 
when asked about this report. 

The long-planned-for four terra 
BJttem will, anleM something uufore- 
seen happens, go into effect at M. A. 
C. next fall, at the beginning of the 
year ID MM 7. According to this 
arrangement tin- college year will he 
divided into four terms, each twelve 
weeks long, each followed by a vaca- 
tion of one week. The college year 
will commence, as at the pi .sent 
time, in the fall, and commencement 
exercises will be beld in .June, stu- 
dents being admitted only once a 
year, in the fall. The fourth term, 
extending from the last part of June 
to the last pari of September, will be 
used only by the lii>rliciiltiir.'il com •#*, 
such as market-gardening, and the 
purely agricultural courses. MtCO as 
the major studies of general agricul- 
ture and dairying. The object ol the 
fourth term for such coins. - i^ i" 
give the students in those subjects an 
opportunity for actual practical work, 
eithei on tin- M. A. ('. campus or 

through employment in responsible 

practical-work positions elsewhere. 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

Forum Takes Place of Regularly 
Scheduled Program. 
Owing to the inability of William 
C. Brown, former president of the 
New York Central railroad, to speak 
at Wednesday's assembly the hour 
was given up to a student forum. 
Palmer '16, treasurer of the Senate, 
reported a balance of about 816 from 
the football blanket fund. It was 
voted to give this to the athletic field 
and to have the blankets remain the 
property of the athletic association. 

Aikeu '16 reported a deficit of $80 
on account of the special train to the 
Springfield game. It was voted to 
take up a collection at Friday morn- 
ing's chapel to meet this deficit. 

The question Ol having a Musical 
club concert and dance at the Copley 

Piasa during Christmaa vacation was 

brought up for discussion Andeison 
'16 explained that 150 couples would 
be necessary to finance the project. 
The plan met with the general ap- 
proval of the students. 

Palmer '16 and Spaulding '17 then 
brought up the plan of having an 
alumni-undergraduate club of greater 

Boston, which, they said, would do 
much toward cultivating a bettei 
spirit between the students and the 
alumni. With club rooms located in 
lbs < it v. such an organization could 
do much in getting good men to come 
to M. A. C. An appropriate time 
f..i the get-together was suggested, 
the plan being to ha\e a banquet 
possibly during Christmas vacation 
At the next forum Dec. X. the pro- 
posed organization will be discussed 



HEBREW PEOPLE KNOWN 

FOR IDEAS, NOT POWER 

Prof. Grant of Smith College Gives 

First of T. M. C. A. Lecture 

Series 

Prof. Elibu Grant of Smith Col- 
lege gave an interesting talk at the 
College Y, M. C. A. meeting Thurs- 
day night, this being the first of a 
series of lectures on "Old Testament 
History up to New Testament 
TimeB." Professor Graut laid es- 
pecial emphasis on the fact that the 
Hebrew people are an important fac- 
tor in history, not because of their 
political power but because they are 
a people of ideas and ideals Com- 
ing late in history, as compared to 
the other ancient civilizations, the 
Hebrews in Palestine were directly 
in the path of all great world move- 
ments. They stood in the center of 
the ancient world, continually in- 
vaded by one or more of the great 
warring countries about them, but by 
eternal perseverance, maintained 
themselves as a nation and developed 
those qualities which have made 
them the creditors of all the world. 

The second of Professor Grant's 
lectures will be given Thursday even- 
ing, Dec. '2. 



Greenwich, Conn., will address tie 
club. Mr. Drew, who is one of tin 
foremost authorities on fruit-growing 
in the country, will take for hi 
subject "Success of Marketing Frur 
in the Cities." One week from that 
date, December 2, Herbert Colling 
wood, editor of the Rural New 
Yorker, will speak before the club. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 1915. 



INDEX TICKETS NOW ON 

SALE BY BUS. DEPT. 

Advance tickets for the 1917 
Index are already ou sale and may 
be obtained, on payment of a dollar, 
from the men of the business depart- 
ment,— F. W. Mayo, Latham, Irving 
and Henderson. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

(Continued from page 'I 



be given for all suclw more filllv 



Credit will 
work. 

It is planned DOS to BAY! the first 
first term open about Sept. 19, and 
extend through to Christmas, when ■ 
week's rseSSS would follow. The 

Second term would then stait around 
JaU I. Continuing to the last week in 
Man b. about the time of the pi. 

■cheduled spring mention. After a 

vacation Of a week the third term 
sv.uild begin, to last until the last 
week in dune, when the OMMMttOS- 

nt exerciaes will be held Thome 

studying other tahjecta than tboee 
offered special summer work will have 
the enttra 14 weeks from the close of 
the third t«rm to the beginning of 
i be next college year the following 
>eptaruher. 

This plan of arrangement is not 
definite as yet. and must not be un- 
derstood as final, as there are apt to 
he ebwges made by the facility in 
regard to detail*. The approved 
calendar for next year will be printed 
in the ('oiJKoiAif sometime before 
the Christmas recew, M soon a* it i* 
made public h\ lbs IVeMdent's 
ntlloe. 



•jy. — Herbert ,). Slack i« a mem- 
her of the science department of the 
llndgeporl llih'b School. Bridgeport, 
loon , for this yinr, He is also do- 
ing work for a Ph. I), in the indus- 
trial science investigation. 



NEW WIRELESS STATION 

POSSIBILITY AT M. A. C. 

Professor Robbins Working for Well 
Equipped Radio Station 

I . w people outside of the physics 
department realize bow much has 
i„«ii dom toward the establishment 
of a wireless station at this college. 
Prof. H. K. Bobbins has been quietly 
working on the project, and plana 
are now before Treasurer Kenney for 
using the room over the Sophomore 
physics UthomtOiy as headquarters. 
Among the pieces of apparatus al- 
rtady on hand are \ I 10,000 volt, 3-4 
kilowatt tranaformei. crystal detector 
and other apparatus such as head 
phones and the like. 

Professor Bobbins has suggested 
that an Intercollegiate Radio League 
l»e organised, with stations at least 
in all the eastern colleges for the 
transmission of intercollegiate news. 
hh'Wions. new raovenwnls, results of 
athletic contests* and such items will 
become % matter of common knowl- 
edge among the members of tie 
league, revolutionising relatione bs» 
IfFten colleges aa regards current 
event*. 

•o;,. —Bertram Topper is the Ply- 
month County Farm Agent for the 
Agricultural Bureau of the Brock- 
ton Chamber of Commerce. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

Woolley '16 and Davis '18 Speak at 
Tuesday Meeting 

At the regular meeting of the 
Stocklnidgc Club, Tuesday evening, 
Prank C. Davis '1(5 of Mendou and 
Harold C. Woolley 'If, of Maiden 
gUVf inlet eating talks, the former on 
the organisation and ellicieucy of 
It i in management and the latter on 
the method-, of fruit growing iu the 
west. huiing his talk, Mr. Davis 
emphasized the need of systematic 
book-keeping on the farm, as ac- 
curate records are the only means of 
proving economic agriculture. Pro- 
fitable fanning also depends upon 
the kind of crop grown, the nearness 
of the market, and the condition of 
the hind. The agriculturist must 
study local conditions before he de- 
cides upon the specially of his farm. 
In roost cases, the farmer who 
specializes does so wisely. Just as 
the eocuti \ store failed when it 
attempted to carry too wide a variety 
of goods, just so wilt the farmer who 
generalizes too much be unable to 
carry on his work economically. 

Mr. Woolley spoke of his travels 
in the west two \ears ago, outlining 
his observation* of fruit-growing as 
carried on there. He saw many 
fruit farms, especially in Oregon and 
Washington, which, though they 
generally put out a fruit of excellent 
shape and color, fail to produce the 
flavored varieties as grown in the 
east. Hie impression was that pros- 
peets are not so bright among the 
western farmers as they would seem, 
for handicapped by the great distance 
from markets, they are slowly losing 
out to the eastern fruit growers. 

On November 30, George Drew 
*07, msnager of Conyers farms in 



selves. These are the two con- 
ceptions of government predominant 
in the world which are now fighting 
for supremacy iu Europe. No man 
can tell which one will tiiumpb, hut 
in either case we shall have in this 
nation, which is so divided in its 
ideals and principles, an inpouring of 
ruthless, heartless hordes to be met 
and dealt with. There has been a 
gradual development of idealism, each 
dying man laying down his life for 
the spirit of unseen, though hoped- 
for things, which at the close of war 
will result iu a new spiritual re- 
naissance. 

" You men are not here merely to 
get your agricultural training hut 
through it to get intellectual discipline. 
to focus your mind and power upou 
some of these obscure problems and 
push them through. On the whole 
one is profoundly disappointed in the 
attitude of the American public ou 
this war. We are despicable in the 
eyes of the world as we think of 
nothing but economic gain. If we 
are to assume this attitude longer, we 
will find Eurojre at the end of this 
war able to build up, in spite of her 
tremendous losses, a new government, 
a new idealism, a new social order, 
while we are playing with our foolish 
toys. 

"Secondly, you should try for 
moral courage — a very rare virtue in 
the present day. It is seldom fouinl 
among business or profeseional men. 
but there never has been a day when 
it was more needed. 

" Lastly, with intellectual integrity 
and moral courage, we need patience 
— and then more patience. In tht 
19th century we were so ingenious In 
harnessing mechanical forces, thai 
we began to think we were gods, and 
accordingly our ideals fell so I 
even the Church slid back. • Ton »»d 
i must face the bitter fact that «• 
are only a little ahead of where 
were a thousand years ago end i«f 
man who is going to be a moral leattoF 
must have patience in working 
wards Ms ideals, in climbing np 
slow winding path of moral civil 
tion, ■ 



NON-ATHLETICS BOARD 

STRONGLY ORGANIZED 
Professor Robbins Gives Statejnent 
Regarding Formation of 
Organization. 
The Non-Athletics Activities Board 
iu its present form is the outcome of 
ideas and meetings held by members 
of the faculty and students for some 
time past, and has started operations 
this fall as an organized body. A 
general statement along the lines of 
the constitution will give an idea of 
some of the functions of the hoard 
and its relation to the student organ- 
izations. The board is created, (a) 
to administer non-athletic student 
activities, (b) to admiuister all mat- 
ters of finance connected with these 
activities, and (c) to supervise all 
non-athletic policies. The board rec- 
ognizes and conforms to all faculty 
regulations concerning non-athletic 
activities. 

The membership of the board con- 
sists of one student representative 
admitted to the board, two members 
of the faculty appointed by the pres- 
ident of the college, two alumni of 
the college selected by the associate 
alumni, the general manager ap- 
i>oiiited by the president of the col- 
lege, and the president of the college 
ex-ollleio. 

The list of officers and mciiil>ers at 
this time includes the following: 
President Buttei liehl. president e%- 
oflleio ; Prof. W. L. Machmer. presi- 
dent and faculty representative ; F, 
I). (Irigu, vice-president ; Prof, H. 
K. Robbins, general manager and 
executive officer of the liotird ; Orton 
I. Clark, secretary and alumni meiii- 
i.er; Prof. W. P. B. I ,ock wood, fac- 
ulty member; .1. T Nicholson (Rois- 
ter Doisters). C. A. Huntington, it, 
1 1 oi.i.koian) and F. A. Anderson 
( Musical clubs). 

The executive committee of the 
board is composed of Professor Rob- 
bins, Professor Lock wood and Mr. 
Nicholson. The gji.^O tax collected 
this fall provides for the subscription 
to the ( oi i.j.-i.i \n, the initial support 
of the Musical clubs snd the Roister 
Doisters, running expenses of the 
board and contributes to a fund for 
minor activities. It should lie noted 
that the above takes care of the 
charter members of the board, but 
•loes not Imply that the activities 
'Mentioned are the only possible reeip- 
ientl of help from the board. 

The treasurer of the college is the 

• iistodian of the funds controlled by 

'he hoard. Expenditures shall he 

ade only through the office of the 

••usurer of the college when ap- 

•>ved in advance by the representa- 

ve of the activity in question and 

• general manager of the board. 

be activities of each organization 

presented by the hoard are gov- 

ned by a committee consisting of 

i manager of the organization in 

•ston snd three other membes of 

a board including the general man- 

*r and the secretary. Any activity 



recognized by the faculty and which 
has existed under a definite plan of 
organization, may upon a two-thirds 
vote of the board be represented on 
the board. 



INSTRUCTOR APPOINTED 

FOR EXTENSION WORK 

W F. Turner to Take Charge of Ani- 
mal Husbandry Work in Exten- 
sion Service. 

Mr. William F. Turner of Belts- 
villi-. Md , has recently been ap- 
pointed Extension Instructor in Ani- 
mal Husbandry at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, filling the va- 
cancy caused by the resignation of 
George F. Story, who is now Pro- 
fessor of Animal Husbandry at the 
University of Vermont. 

Mr. Turner is well (piulificd for 
bis new duties. He is a native of 
Kansas and a graduate of the Kansas 
State Agricultural College in the 
class of 1910. Besides his practical 
experience on his home farm, he has 
filled seveial teaching positions. For 
one year he was instructor in animal 
husbandry at the North Carolina Ag- 
ricultural College, two years in 
charge of feeding experiments at 
Brownsville, Tex., six months in 
charge of cattle tick experiments for 

the department of Agriculture at 

Anthony. Fla.. and sim-e October, 

1918, was a representative of the • !»•- 
partiuetit at Rcltnville. Md., where 
he had charge of the operating of a 
dairy farm. Mr. Turner's new du- 
ties will include extension school end 
lecture work, preparing curteepotid- 
ence Instruction, organisation of cow 
test association**, boy's stock judg- 
ing contests, work with bleeders' 
associations and other activitcs foi 
the advancement of the livestock in- 
terests of Massachusetts. 



FOOTBALL REVIEW 

[Colltlhln 'I ft.. ni |KIK<> I I 



efforts. Being made up for the most 
part of veterans, the team will lose 
heavily by gradual ion. Captain Cur- 
ran, Dun forth. Darling. Jordan. 
Palmer, Perry, Plnisicd, Muiphv. and 
Verbeek are all hard workers whose 
loss will be keenly felt. Beefy man 
of them played the game for all that 
was in htm, and did hia part in mak- 
ing a successful season. 

Dav and Oravson. who held down 
the wing positions so well this year, 
with Dunn at guard and Weeks at 
fullback, are the letter men around 
whom next year's team will be built. 
Along with them will lie a good num- 
ber of men who worked hard this year 
aa subs, to whom goes half the credit 
for making the varsity what It was. 

The season's scores follow % 

M A. < . M|l|«IIMMIt*. 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN ft DYER, Props. 
Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 



ONE 



-Pens— 

YEARS SUPPLY 
OF MAGAZINES 



10c 



nil Yflll KNflW "i"' IiuikIi'-iId of puiiittihura 
uu iuu anuff „„„,,, ,„. „!„,, ,„(„,,„,, „„„ ,, 

fr«'r Kiiiniile copy of tlii'lr Maintain** If tin'* only 
knpw >niir tfmaf It ii our business to hir- 
nish publishers mily with llir names of Intelll- 
Kent magazine refiner*. If yoo will vuiie »«m 
lull iitlilrexx VERY plain ;m<l si-mi a* ONLY 10 
cents in silver or money order we will genii 
your twine tc>»e\ cml hundred publishers within 
a year, who will «r>tid you FREE tamule i opies 
of huiMlreilx (jNM.Mvcnl hundreds) of the lead 
ilia StiiiKiunl HtppttlBW, Kwriii l*ii |n-r«. I'liiiltrs 
Journals. Mori MaanutinM. R#i ie«» and Weekly 
Papers, Mail order mid Trade Publication*, 
Ifiuimfctianiin MaiM/mcx. '.'aidiion Journals 
Illustrated Hagaxiaea and in fact about nil 
kinds of litifli-iiiade liiterestinif uiaua/incs mm 
inii io you iu most aver] mall fof o\«i . m.m 
ami all rm ONLY 10 rests in silver . 

WE-DO-AS-WE-SAY 

no semi a - 1 1 v «■ r dime at once ami y..in naJMa 
will go ou our next month's i Ireulatiuu li»l anil 
>ou will lie greatly »nr|iii»ed at the remiitf. aj 
we assure yon that you will be mini than Will 
pleased with the «mall ln\ i.tmen! And you 
WILL NEVER regret il. \ddrr*» the Mavaslns 
rin iiiatiutr < o . Ho* Wig, Mnototi, i s \ r|* 
eulatitur Kept. n;m, DON'T fail to write YOUR 
full address EXTRA plain tt. have Hiuiirthlnu 
In -tore (in run a* a real surpiise -if jiiu wlil 
please let in. kn..« in what |atpei y • ■■> «aw this 
advertisement 



An Especially flood Commission Proposition 
Cash for test order* .\m.l< ■ideli Aaverilstd- 
Cuts down expense is powet i fents- Addiess 
Kni.inkhsim. Stiefn if lilJS N ntl. Street, 
Philadelphia, I'.i. 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Hras«, Pipe, V,ilv»^ 
snd Fittings for Steani. Watet and 0*S, \iliestos 
and Magnests Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies, Englneeis and 
Contractors fin stenm gad Hoi Watei Heating 
\utnm;iti< Sprinkle) Systems, Boilei and F.ngire 
Connections. Holyoke, Maas, 

RECKMAN*S 

Candies and Ice Cream 

** II/V.XIl* » 

" BIDE-A-WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

0«l specialty —And otliei K <«,il thing* to I .1 

MKS, L. M. SI IBBINS, 

\li.le1le Street, Had lev, M;iss. 

DR. R. C. BANGS 

Dentist 
NASH'S BLOCK 

r.vehiiiKsliv \ |.|*>int melit 

hold Ularrcti 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T. J. AHERN. manac.cn 



T|J f Q are supplied every year 

Durpee s deeds dm it * ,,m ° r cA,m - n 

• can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow'* ? Jf not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee' a 
Annual for 1914, a bright new book of 1 H2 pages, u Inch 
I is recognized as "The Leading American Heed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

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F*«ire f ^ Shoe Store 



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Big surprise for M. A. C men ;U our MOrel 

Don't buy Footwear till you see us 

iv i . i • x i iv I x*«; houl»k-w<-..r Leaihei used 



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LOCALLY: 5^ Center St.. Northampton, Mass., 

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These Studios offer the he*t skilled 
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Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 





■\3 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 19' 5- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 1915. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every TnescUj evening 

lis the Student! of the tfasswhu- 
M'tis Agricultural College. 

BOARD <>i' KIMToliS. 



TYL.KK i. ROOKBS '16, 
KICIIAItU W. SMITH IT 

rftANK .1. S( ll Ki 1 ill I 

Tlios. l. 11 \i:i:i»i k- !• 
Al.KKKU * RKUiWA 'W. 
||\V MillT I'. I!\I!MS In. 

MILFORO li. Uk¥ REJM K'l 



E(1ltiir-iii-( liif f 

Macatfing Editor 

\**i»t;int Kilitnr 

\llili-tii- Kilitnr 

Athletic BdttOf 

Aluuint Eilltor 

\t-«s Kdltor 



KLLIOT HRSIMCRISON n. iM-i'.iiiiiirnt Editor 
WILLIAM RA^ ILLS. J ft. 11< < .inum* Kdltor 
MARSHALL O. LAN I'll KA II 1*. Vsm.'c Kdltor 



alumni and undergraduates and to 
have the college put up to them as a 
real live proposition. Dr. Peters, 
secretary of the associate alumni, 
says that the alumni will be glad to 
co-operate with the undergraduates 
in the formation of such a club, 
which they have been waiting to see 
foi some time. The alumni cannot 
be expected to do all the work, it is 
now up to the undergraduates to do 
their share. 



BUSINESS DKI'A HTM KNT. 

• II \«. \ III MIM.'|tiN,.lli. Hi. 

RtiBlneM Manager 

MBRK1I.I. P. WAUNKKTT, 

AMiatmit r.iixiness Mamtger 

lkstkrr.fi km »in<; -is, 

\ilw-iti«lutr Mamiger 
.MMI.M . I<>\\ I.I.I. -1H. rinillall.m 



Buhserlpthui *i.gu |.«i year. Single 
popies, 5 cents, Stake all »ir4eri pay* 
ble i" ( M kuuu A. lliMiN<iT<iN, .in. 



K.nt«'r«'il as Hfrniiii , l.i>» in.iHi'i .iiihr AniherM 
I-..-1 Office. 

Vol. XXVI. Tuesday, Nov. 23. No. 10 

Next issue of the Collegian Dec. 



Although Stockbtidge Hall lias 
been in use by the students and pub- 
lic for over a month, it has been noted 
that the eoatrooins are still quite use- 
lew because the hooks have not yel 
been installed. 

Motion picture* every week in the 
auditorium promise lobe very popular 
this winter. The first entertainment, 
which w»i a great success, suggested 
the opportunity for the student* to 
practice singing between the reels. 
A small group of leaders in the cen- 
ter of the hall can be responsible for 
leading the Mings, and the rest of the 
audience will umkmbtably be glad to 
join in. This custom, should it be- 
come established, will 1* a distinct 
benefit to the wen, besides adding a 
pleasant feature to the entertainment. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notices f»r tli In column should lie dropped in 
at the < in i i li an Office Or handed to William 
Savile, Jr. If on or before theHatnrday tireewl- 
Ina each issue.! 

Weomsk ai , Nov. 24. 
li-iHi m. --Tlianksitivim: reeesH becima. 
|-:MI i*. M. S]ieiinl braill leaves C, v. 
Btatton fur Boston, arriving 

ill 4-1K. 
Mo\H \\ , \<l\ _",l 

k-;{(i \, ».— Special train reiiiniinu 
leave* s <>- Btattoo, Huston. 

l-(Mi e, \i.— Thanksgiving recess ends, 
regular ficbednle <>i classed 
li i -n \\ , Nov. 80. 

0-45 I'. H. — Glee t'luli l!ehearsal.iha|iel. 

B-H C. M. — Sluekliliilue t'luli. place Ul 

an an n need, 

Wkhskhpav, Hm . I. 
I-in i'. m. — Assembly, I'res. Iluiteiiiehl. 

Ma« llleclllie, 

l'innsii\ v. Dm i 
(MB p. m. v. K.C 4,n»e«ttBg,eaap©l. 
H-30 i- m. -|tehe:ir«al fur east .-I 

"Pluto's Daughter," 

Kuioav, I>k< . B, 
I ,ii i\ \i. Movttoti Pieiut.-. \mli- 
torinm. 
SvsoAl i»i • •■ 

fl-I.-i V. M. -MiiiiImv rlia|.el. Itev.J.H. 

Ditrkee, < .iiiipell,,, Mas*. 
2-:«lc. H. Uleerlitli |{fhoar!»aI.eli:i|.el. 

I I R*f] \\ . Dee, ", 
*U4.*iC, H„- <ilee (Hub Uehearsal.i Itapel. 
1 M I', M.-MoikliriiltfC Club, place lo 

lie Hllllulllieeil. 

Wkonksii \> , 1>I < . *. 
I III I-. M. Sltnlent H'liriim, Atuiilo- 
riunt. 



Is He Human or Wax? 

"Glason" the wonderful Automaton, 
demonstrating 

THE PENN SAFETY 

"The Razor With the Blade 
that Shaves" 

Every blade guaranteed to give you a 
Smooth, Clean. Velvet Shave 

Price Complete, $1.00 

The only guaranteed, money-back-if- 

not-satisfactory, safety razor 

on the market 

WATCH OUR WINDOW 
Friday ft Saturday, Dec. 3 ft 4 



THE VALUE OF YOUR G0LLE6E 
EDUCATION 

will not be measured by the few 
things that you are going to re- 
member, but rather by a knowl- 
edge of how and where to obtain 
information as you need it. This 
means that you will need 

A CERTAIN FEW REFERENCE BOOKS 

We have them on our shelves at 

85 Pleasant Street 



MUTUAL 

Plumbing & Heating Co. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



t)r the more than sixteen hundred 

alumni and students of M. A. Cm 

probablv one-hnif now live in the 

vicinity of grealei MohIoij. and it is 

entirely reasonable to iiu|jiJoi»e that 

in the future we will coutinue to draw 

a large proportion of «mr students 

from th«' eaatorn half nf the state, 

A strong movement has lieen started 

In form mi M, A. C eluh of greater 

Houston, ihp tttjedl of »ueh a Huh 

being to unite iritu OM i-cntrnl organ- 

izntion the Aggie men of that section 

and to bring the ilumnl and fttntlesta 

into clo«cr*vmp« lit \ « it Hone anothei . 

Now is the time for llu- Boston men 

to get beh i nd and push this plan 

ihroiigh to lonijiIetioM A« Itoaton 

is within easy i«'«e!i of hundrcdi of 

Aggio UH'U. one mm tote^rt in tht* 

fuliirij linnnal hanquets ml Chriatrnas 

time, itlniimi git.ioj/eilierh during the 

sear ami |Hm»iiily a chili room, which 

will In' tin' leiidi/voiiM uf Aggie men 

in 'tie eltV. Ileie ill I i-f I e»h llieli 

WO»n>! Iiuvfi ftll tJ4J|ioi tunity to meet 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Students to pomology 1 are reno- 
vating the orchard of Professor Todd 
of Amherst College. 

* • • 

William R, Irving of Tauntoa haa 
been chosen captain and Harry Ilig- 
ginbotham of Taunton manager of 
If 17 basketball team for the corning 
season. 

Adalphis, the senior honorary so- 
ciety, held a simple bancpiet a Dra- 
per Hall, Sunday morning, Nov, §1, 
Thirteen of its fourteen members 

were present, 

• • • 

The complete system of tile drain- 
] age on the graas plots north of the 
Kx |»ei intent station is being over- 
hauled, scraped, and some new lines 
of tile laid to lake care of the drain- 
age from the upper plots. 
■ • • 

Lewis T. ItiickBwn *17, of Wilkes- 
Barre, !*»,, fcai hem appoints one 
of the two assist ii nt managers of 
'varsity hookey, to (111 the vacancy 
ca used when Qeorge King Babbitt of 



The Survival 
of the Fittest 




Tried in the furnace of competition 
and tested on nearly i^oooooo farms 
ihe world over, the I3e Laval has 
proved its superiority lo all other 
cream separators. 

Think of all the separators you used 
to see advertised so extravagantly. 
Where are they now? Why do you 
seldom, if at all, see their names men- 
tionrd ? Simply because the fittest 
must survive and the others must fall 
mil of the race 

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

%m Itn md w w f New York 

» fc MAdtaiin M , i hlraiin 




JOHNSON BOOK CO 

R. A. Mooney M. W. Bishop 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

REGULAR SUNDAY SERV1CB AT 7 F M, 

LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDEK 

Suits Cleaned, Pressed and Dyed All kinds ol 

Repairing for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly dene 

High-grade work by first-class tailor. Work 

called for and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing 

4 suits for Si. so 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, Rrop 

Main Street, Amherst, Mass. Nash Block 

On your way to the Post Office. TeLajo-W 



E. E. MILLETT 

JKWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jhwilny 

Violin. Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar String. 

IMIIIIIM MA KB. 

Ne»t to Post Office- 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Gradt ColUgt Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



1015c 

1 l-K 

a i-ic 
48c per doz 
30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, 11,50 a Suit 



R, T. FaoiT.Agent ; D, Sherinv ah, A»*t A gem 
Try our ticket if stem - — 

Put full name and address on laundr> 



Stkphkn Lawk Folubb 

MAittJrAt'rtfRiMei jkwhlkm 



1»0 HWMIWAY, 



NBW YC1HK 



i'l^LUl AND tX>IjL.KCiK 

PUN'S AND KINfiN w» 

,*«»I.U. *«II.V«B AWn HMIIMZ.II MSD4U 

8. S. HYDE 

JEWELER A OPTICIAN 

Now at ij Pleasant St, 
11. uliit*' Pr»wnptiou» Fi11«*d, Broken Lenses 

Accurately Replaced. Pin* Watch Repairing 
Promptly and Skilfully Done. 
Satisfaction Uuraw 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Orown try the Floricultural Dept 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stot k 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnation*, 
violets, chrysanthemums and swert 
peas in season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

T.l.|.l...r.. SOO 

WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 

<io«d work speaks for Itself 

Nash Block, Amherst, M * 



>uton left college at the beginning 
f this year. 

* » » 

The new bleachers which have 

en taken down for the winter an 

om heing painted a battleship grmv 

i'Iil' bleachers are of the genuine 

rti8 variety and can be taken down 

and put up on short notice. Thev 

.ill he used on the baseball field in 

Die spring, 

• • m 

Two new bulletins have just been 
issued by the extension depurtnienl 
of the college. One is entitled "The 
■M-ptic Tank," by Dr. Charles K. 
Marshall and the other "The Care of 
Karin Machinery." by Prof. Chris* 
nan I. <Jiiiiiiess of the department of 
1 ural engineering. 

» » 

Students in FI01 ienltnre n are get- 
ting some good prariical experience 
in i-ement work in the laving out ami 
coiistniclion of a new. .">.") x (I ft. cold 
frame on the side hill in the rear of 
Krench Hull which when completed 
»iil give the department two hundred 
more feet under the glass for early 
■piing storage work. 

• • . 

At a meeting of the Cercle Frattcnis 
Wednesday evening the following 
officers were elected for the ensuing 
rear: 1'iesident. Henjamin A. nil- 
more cif Acushnet ; y ice-p re sident, 
Kied Sampson of Fall River; secre- 
tary, Maurice Goldstein of West 
Lynn; treasurer, Reginald Hart of 
Montague City. 

m 

Orders were read at the regimental 
parade Wednesday afternoon of last 
week announcing that no mere field 
M parade exercises in drill would he 
held this fall. This is the only time 
within recent years at least that drill 
has been suspended before the Christ. 
mas recess, and was welcome news 
t.« everyone, from colonel to private. 

a * 

A movement is on foot to organise 
■ Greater Boston M. A, C. Club, 
members of which shall be anv of 
thi alumni or three upper classes of 
undergraduates who will be able to 
take an active interest. It Is pi mi- 
ned to have a few get-togethers at 
first, and to organise more strongly 
«d earnestly later oa, when club 
rooBia will be rented, and the club 
become a permanent and tnflu 
1 organisation to help boost the 
int. rests of the college. There have 
*»» b smaller organisations of a «tm- 
ITar nature some of the suburliK. but 
iijje and efficient one ban yel 

formed. It is hoped that the 
nts will eo-operate with the pro* 
i" 4 rt as much us possible in mak- 
>^I ii siieeesn of the project. 



bo 

A 

H. 



''i7, — Fiank K. Hhaw has been 

•«h1 a hoot six years and haw three 

He is nuperiiitendetit of the 

Heel Company, 49 North 

fllo Street, Brockton. 



FRESHMEN TAKE RIFLE 

MATCH FROM SOPHOMORES 

Underclass Teams Tied Until Last 
Man Shoots Possible Score 

By a score of -I'.U to 193, the 

Freshmen won the annual indoor 
retle match with the Sophomores Sat- 
urday. The contest was a close one, 
the score being a tie until the last 
man, Bice '19, hit the bull's ere for 

Hin and won the match. Moth teams 
showed some promising varsity ma- 
terial, and two of the Freshmen, 
Woodaid and Rice, -diot perfect 
seoies. At the beginning of the 
shooting. Manager Da vies of the 
1919 team was protested N the 
Sophomores and his position was 
taken by Tvlor. 

Summary of points : 
Woodard 100 Frellnk !»!» 

Rice 100 Minoi 19 

C.off 98 Barton 99 

Mattoon !»s Raymond !'H 

Sweeney 98 Hurlbuit :»7 



CAMPION 

Fine Tailoring 

COLLEGE OUTFITTER 

Eeady-To-Wear Clothes 





i:»i 



m 



HXCHANGh PROFESSOR 

New Plan To Be Tried In Landscape 
Gardening. 

Professor Ralph R. Root, Associate 
Professor of Horticulture, and head 

of the Landscape A leliitectural de- 
partment of the University of Illinois 
will take Professor Waugh's place 
from Dec 1 to 17 under the Brat ex- 
change of professors of this kind e\e. 
attempted here. Professor Waugh 
will go to Illinois at Ihe the same tune 
to conduct Professor Root's classes. 

Professor Root is 1 graduate of 
( oiiicll, has studied landscape arch- 
itecture at Harvard, and has hud 
practical work among Boston practi- 
tioners, lie has published a lunik 
on Landscape Gardening. He will 
take all of Professor \\ aiigh's classes 
and will lecture to the Landscape 
Art Club some evening during his 
stay. 

Professor Waugh plans to lay em- 
phasis on the native landscape and 
its use in landscape gardening during 
his work in Urbana. 



DR. EMMERICH SPEAKS 

Horn* Missionary Secretary at Morn- 
ing Chiip.-l 

Dr, F. K. Emmerich, Field Secre- 
tarv of the Massachusetts Home 

Missionary Society, gave a short 
talk to the students at Monday morn- 
ing chapel. lie is probably more 
intimately acquainted with the home 
life of the people of this common- 
wealth than any other mull One 
of the liest things nw?n get in col- 
lege, he «id, it the continual asao- 
einlion with other men from different 
parts of tin 1 state, Massachusetts is 
already feeling the Influence of the 
immigrant ami the sons of the immi- 
grant. G ove r no r Walsh himself Is a 
line example of what American 
equality of opportunity can do for ■ 
man. Sonic of the best thinkers and 
writers in American life today are 
new-comers to onr shores, persons 



F. A SHERARD 

ME N'S STO RE 

Use Our New Cash Discount Card and Save Five Per Cent 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 

Come to us b»r 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glnd to see yon. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



FREE 



For a ft'w days only here's your chance tn get 

FREE 

With n 90c Humid. ir of Tuxedo Tobacco, a 
— tiKNt INK FRENCH BRIAR 

PIPE 

SKK THEM IN THE WINDOW 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 



The kexall Store —On th 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 191s. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 19* 5- 



J. GI2V«KILTI*0 

11 i-a Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

76c Special Half Sole, Rubber 75c 

WICI'AIWIM< 

Black, Tan, White \v..rk Guaranteed. 

1'WICKS 

K'ibber Soles •I.SO 

Kubber Soles, with Hath • Bl.ia 

Soles Sewed, *•« 

%% Sliln.n for »lmi 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 9 to 12 A. m., i 30 to 5 p. m. 



STEAM KITTING, Talaphone 59— R 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 
Windows, Lead Lights, &c. 

1 a Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS 



You'll Want a New Suit for Thanksgiving 

Select it today. The new styles in Autumn and Winter patterns ;iwait 
your inspection. You will want a stylish, comfortable SUIT or OVER- 
COAT. Step in and examine our line. Si\le is ihe addition to the latest 
fashion, to your individual need. Custom clothes ate designed for VOl 
not simply cut to fit the stocky sized man. ( Mir < ii i.ts' Furnishings Line is of 

The Latest Goods in Shirts and Collars 
Kid Gloves, all styles New Dress Vests at very reasonable prices 



like Jacob A. Riis, Marie Antin, 
Uibani, the Syrian poet, and the 
great leader of the black race, Hooker 
T. Washington. 

SIXTEEN MEN AWARDED 

THE "M" FOR FOOTBALL 

Dr. Brides Given Letter in Recogni- 
tion of his Four Years of 
Coaching. 

At the November meeting of the 
joint committee on intercollegiate 
athletics the following men were 
awarded the "M" for work on the 
football team this year: 1916— Cap- 
tain Curran, Danforth, Darling, 
Jordan, Murphy, Palmer, Perry, 
Plaisted, Sehlotteibeck, Verbeck and 
Manager Moses; 1917— Day and 
Qayson; tilS — Dune and Weeks. 
Coach Krides was also awarded a 
letter in acknowledgement of his 
work for the team for the past four 
years. 



ALL KINDS OI KIPMK WORK NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONK 



DYKING 



ALTERING 



CLEANING 



PRESSING 



LABROVITZ, 



Custom Tailor 



,1 AMITY ST. 



TELEPHONE iXCHANGE 

IN STOCKBRIDGE HALL 

Central Station Now Handles All Calls 
From College Buildings. 

Due to the greatly increased num- 
ber of telephone calls at the college, 
stoekbridge Jlall is now the home of 
a telephone exchange, under the 
charge of Miss Else, who was form- 
erly employed at the main telephone 
office in Amherst, All calls entered 
from any of the M. A. C. buildings 
will go through this exchange, which 
is in operation daily fioin 8 A. M. to 
."> i\ M. 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 



the most economical you can use. 

BetteR crops 

are the inevitable result. 




LYI&* 



THE ROGERS fc HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

Urti«-e mill Wink-, I'o rt IhiiiI , ("itiili. 



COPLEY SQUARE HOTEL 



Huntington Ave., Exeter and Btagden Sts., Boston, Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

AMOI M. WHIPPLE, .-•<<.•• 



C&rp*rvter & AAorehous*, 

PRINTERS, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, M 



Now is the time to be planning for 



Fraternity Groups 

-Have them laken at—— 

MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 

44 State Street, - Northampton, Mas* 



APPLE PACKING SCHOOL 
The annual school of apple pack- 
ing will close this afternoon after 
a moat successful week's work. 
Twenty men and one woman took the 
course. The class was divided into 
two sections, one receiving lectures, 
the other practical experience in apple 
packing at the storage plant. An 
apple packing contest will be held 
this afternoon in connection with the 
work. Prizes will be offered to those 
standing highest 

SOCIAL UNION PROGRAM 

FOR WINTER ANNOUNCED 

Judge Ban. B. fcindsey Of Denver To 
Speak Early In 1016. 
The principal featuresof the Social 
Union program, as announced by 
Alfred A. Gioiosa, chairman of the 
Social Union committee are as fol- 
lows: 
I ),.«., 4— Krnest Gamble Concert 

Parly. 
,j an , 8— Judge Ben B. Lindsey. 
.Ian. it— faculty Kntertainment. 
Feb. 2t'i — Student Vaudeville. 
Mar. 18— Mr, I .Ha ml Powers. 

The customary "Freshman Night" 
performance baa been postponed until 
after Thanksgiving, in addition to 
the program, motion pictures will be 
held in the Auditorium every Friday 
evening at 6-ao, to which an admis- 
sion of ten cents will lie charged. 
Only holders of season tickets will be 
I admitted to the regularly scheduled 



Social Union entertainments. St - 
dents may obtain these free st t 
Treasurer's office ; for others t e 
price will be $2.50. 

WASHINGTON ALUMNI MEET 

Old and Young Orads Gather at An > . ■ ! 
Banquet. 
M. A. C. men and their wives m«-t 
and dined together at the New Ebbitt 
Hotel, Washington, D. C, on Tues- 
day evening, Nov. 16. A score tf 
loyal members responded to the Call 
for a special meeting of the M. A. C. 
Club to greet the alumni members 
who had come to Washington to attend 
the annual meeting of the Association 
of Official Agricultural Chemists. 
In the absence of Prof. R. W. 
Lyman '71, president of the club. 
vice-president H. L Knight '02 pre- 
sided. In greeting the alumni he 
referied to the disappointment of the 
club at the absence of its president, 
from whom an expression of regret 
was received and an assurance that 
he would be present at the annual 
meeting in January, and to the added 
disappointment in the absence of Dr 
C. II Jones '90, president of the A. 
O. A C, who had been detained by 
committee meetings. Mr. Knight 
called attention to the fact that in hh 
election to the office of president. Dr 
Jones is the second alumnus to 1h> 
thus honored by that association. Dr. 
H J. Wheeler 'H3 having been elected 
to the office in 1902. He spoke of 
i he gratification that the club felt in 
the decision of President ButterfleUI 
to remain at M. A. C. and a commit- 
tee was appointed to express the 
same to the President The great 
loss that the club has suffered in tin 
death of Prof. K. W. Morse ex-*B4, a 
most loyal member and regular at- 
tendant at its meetings, was referred 
to and a committee appointed to draw 
up resolutions 

Dr. E. B. Holland '92 was intro- 
duced as one with news from home. 
He responded with an interesting ac- 
count of college events and a des- 
cription of the new buildings. H. D. 
Hnskins '90 was next called upon awl 
spoke enthusiastically of the new 
athletic field and emphasized the Deed 
of further subscriptions for it. 

H. A. Noyse '12 of Purdue Univer- 
sity, who attended the Springfield 
game entertained the club with » 
most interesting description of it 
Carlton Bates 'OH of the Bureau of 
Chemistry, who is leaving Wathinf- 
ton to take a responsible position with 
a manufacturing company in Mil- 
waukee, spoke briefly as did P< E- 
W. Allen *86 who was introdn<-> > ■' 
tie "father of the club." 

<;, A. Mil lings '!),"> acting as ( 
gus, accompanied by Mrs, Knh 
the piano, led with the college • 
The old and new yells were gb> 
"Prexy," led by S. K. Farrar 
The present were : K. W. All 
and Mrs. Allen, F. B. ( arpeut- 
W. II. Ileal (honorary), H. D 
kins '90, K. B, Holland '92 am 
Holland, G. A. Billings '96 an. 



>ra- 
ist 

for 

Is*- 
Jn- 
.Irs. 



! Uings, S. W. Wiley '98, M.P. Pin- 
e *99, W. A. Hooker '99, H. L, 
Tight '02 and Mrs. Knight, Carlton 
tee '08, W. P. Turner '08, H. A. 
uoks '10, H. A. Noyes '12, H. A. 
iraer '12, A. H. Russell '14, and S. 

K Farrar '15. 



ENTOMOLOGISTS 

MEET IN CANADA 
I ur Aggie Alumni at Sessions of 
Ontario Society. 

Four of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College alumni together with 
Dr. Fernald attended the meetings 
of the Ontario Entomology Society, 
tie Id November fourth and fifth in 
Ottawa. The Aggie delegations 
consisted of C. P. Lounebury of 
South Africa and Dr. C. H. Higgins 
of Ottawa both from the class of *1M, 
A. F. Bnrgess '95, of Boston and L. 
S. McLaine '10 of Ottawa. 

Dr. Fernald gave the address of 
honor, the public address on Thurs- 
day evening, his subject being "Live 
Zones in Entomology aud their Rela- 
tions to Crops." The lecture was 
illustrated by lantern slides. Mr. 
Uunsbury spoke on the entomolo- 
gical conditions in South Africa. 
Mi. Burgess as head of the Gypsy 
sod Brown Tail Moth work of the 
I S. Bureau of Entomology spoke 
on certain phases of the work in the 
I uited States. Mr. McLaine gave a 
talk on "Raising of Brown Tail 
Parasites for Distribution in Can- 
uda," illustrated by lantern slides. 

Dr. Higgins, Pathologist of the 
Health of Animals Branch, Domin- 
ion Department of Agriculture, gave 
a luncheon at the University Club, 
Ottawa, to the visiting M. A. C. 
men and a few others, in honor of 
liia classmate Mr. Louushury. 



Inspections 

if 

i 



tabulated results of the 
of feeds sold in this state during the 
year ending Sept. 1, Ifttfi and a gen- 
eral discussion of their feeding value 
there also appear in this pamphlet 
two specials articles entitled ••Feed- 
ing Standards and the Dairy Cow" 
anil "Information of Interest to 
Dairymen" both of which dealt with 
the present knowledge of feeding 
practice. This last named article is 
a revision and enlargement of circu- 
lar 50, written by Dr. J. B. Lindsey. 
which has had a great demand since 
the time of its first issue. These 
articles, in addition to the tabulated 
results and comments on values and 
prices, make the bulletin one for 



which a great 
expected. 



demand should he 



EXPERIMENT STATION PUBLI- 
CATIONS 

bulletin 163 of the Mass. Experi- 
ment Station under the date of Au- 
gust, 1915, is now ready and is being 
•em to all those on the mailing list 
u rapidly as possible. This is a 
bulletin written by G, Edward Gage 
wd Beryl H. Paige of the Depart- 
ment of Veterinary Science issued 
under the title of " Bacillary White 
'harrhea (Bacterium Pullorm Infec- 
tion) i Young Chicks in Massaehu- 
Wtta," It presents a brief history 
of the results of study of the disease, 
tin blood lest by which the presence 
"f it is detected in be is and urges 
*• Ktneral adoption of the teste as a 
ncnni of eliminating the disease. 
s "< this is a disease found in 
Marty all parts of the state and is 
T *fJ serious in its affects on the 
pou-'.ry industry, this bulletin should 
°* of great value to all persons inter- 
In the keeping of poultry. 
* annual report on feedstuffs by 
Smith and C. L, Heals under 
le of Inspection of Commercial 
■tuffs and listed as Control 
Bulletin No. 3 is also ready 
•tribution. In addition to the 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 
Botany 

Weekly get-togethers of the stu- 
dents and staff Instructors in the 
botany department at .M. A. C. are 
the latest progressive move to be in- 
augurated by Associate Professor 
Osmun. Every Wednesday after- 
noon, from 1-80 to $-00 o'clock, the 
instructors meet with the seniors 
who are majoring in botany, aud dis- 
cuss with them articles «»f Interest in 
the current numbers of the leading 
botanical journals. 

Investigational work in the depart- 
ment is now being carried on along 
many lines of great importance to 
the people of the state George II. 
Chapman, assistant botanist of the 
experiment station, is working oil 
the .Mosaic disease of tobacco, which 
causes large annual losses in the 

Connecticut valley. This disease is 
physiological in character, being 
caused by some internal distuilinnce. 
not by a germ. 



m 



I 



the 
He, 

it] 
* 



ALUMNI NOTES 

•07.— 1|. P. Wood. Box IDS, Dal- 
las, Texas has resumed insect crop 
investigation for the l'. S. Bureau of 
Entomology He lives at I pMl Brvan 
Street. 

*08, — H, M Jennison is studying 
for a degree of Ph. I), doing gradu- 
ate work under Drs B. M. Duggaii, 
(I. T. Moore arid others at the Mis- 
souri Botanical Gardens. At the 
same time he is in charge of a large 
part of the work of the botany de- 
partment at Washington University, 
St. I-iOuis, as Instructor In botany 
there. 

'10.— Roger S. Eddie was married 
to Mi»s Gertrude K. Moody on . s uii- 
dav, Oct. 81, at Hols* Trinitv Church, 
If, J. 

Corrections to the 1911 Class list 
appearing under the dale of Novem- 
ber ninth ; 

Johnson, Leonard M., Newtown, 
Conn., principal of the Newtown 
High School. ISJ1 please note the 
correct address of the class secretary, 

Lairnbcp, Edward A., 4" Central 
.street. Boston. With A. W. Ellii 
Co., Advertising Experts. 

*\2. — Benjamin F. Hubert, editor 
of the Pdlmtttn Furtner, Orangeburg, 

burg, S. ('., has been elected general 
superintendent of the South Carolina 
Stale Colored Fair for next year, 
over one of the strongest and most 
popular men in the state. 



COME OVER 
LET'S GET 
ACQUAINTED 




We are ready t<> show von everything that the college man 

needs !<»i comfort in the wa\ of clothes, Here are a few 

of our many offerings, and remember the\ are in 

every ca.se the best oi their kind. 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Ready Clothes 

in just the styles you're looking fot — Four other good makes. 

MACKINAWS FROM $5 UP 

See the famous Patrick line before you get yours. 

We'll -n,i\ c \ uu money. 

The Oakes Sweater is the best made at any price. 
the: prices are from $5 to st 

Absolutely pure wo.il ami made to wear. 
COMPLETE LIMES CF SOFT HATS AND CAPS IN THE LATEST SHAPES AND C0L0RIN6S 



I KCluslve Custom tailoring at Fair Price* 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



f, 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 



% 



1857 



THE BUSINESS FARMERS* STANDARD 
FOR OVER FIFTY HVE YEARS 



1915 



Your Opportunity 

The editor of one of our leading agricul- 
tural paperi writes us under date of January 
12th, 1913, as follows;- 

"I am doing all I can to induce farmers to 
plant gram crops this year, 

* Grain k very high and it is going higher. 
Wheal it going to $2.00 per bushel ami other 
grams will share m the advance. Wheat costs 
$2,50 per 1 00 pounds now, and pound for 
pound oats cost as much. 

"It i eems to me that the eastern farmer's 
salvation is to buy plant food and grow 
CORN, WHEAT, BARLEY, 
OATS AND BUCKWHEAT 

"Last fall i doubled my acreage of waiter 
wheat and this spring 1 shall triple the acreage 
of oats. I managed to produce 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre, and sold the straw at 
$1 7.00 per ton in the barn,'* 

THE OPPORTUNITY » YOURS f 

Be sure that you buy 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

THey are available plant foods that more than meet the most 
exacting requirement*, smug plump, sound, full heads of gran and vigor- 
ous, healthy straw. 

Eastern users of E. Frank Co© Fertaiiers are raising 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre. The average for the United Sates for three yean 
is 1 4 i'o bushels to the acre, 

THE OPPORTUNITY IS YOURS I WILL YOU MAKE THE MOST Of IT t 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, SI Chambers S 



t, N. Y.J/ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 1915. 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

No* luc.ileil oVi-r (mil • .itite, I p BtU! Might 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticktt sw.-iii lei. j>-M 

T. MIEXTKA. 

SHOE STORK 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Upen Sunday from 7-12. On your way to P.O. 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner ol Hilliuaii ami Harm's Street!, three 
blocks Irom tti« L'liiou Iteat, is » Modern Hos- 
telry run on the t&uropun Cl.ui. It >-> just 1 step 
from Main Mreet. away I ruin the 1101st- and dust 
and yet in the center of the buiiness district. 

Its room* are well mi nislifd and cuinlortable, 
having a telephone and hot and coli miming 
water in eveiy room, dices III and up; rooms 
with bath (single) 81.Su and up. 

itsencellent cuisine ani *el! ventilated dining 
1 twin makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest qualm, well cooked and 
Mrv<*d in tne best possiule manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and \uu will 
anticipate staying thete again. Maw every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



The Massachusetts Agricultural Cotton F0UNTAIN PENS 

. . , , Moore's Swan 

Oilers courses of instruction id twenty seven teaching 

departments, which embrace the study of Waterman's 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 



A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



Thirty-six dozen pens to select fron 



Highland Hotel 



«»|m injili. I.I. Hi 



siiim nm 1 ure 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

E. D. MARSH ESTATE 

Cox Sons & Vining 

72 Madison Ave , New York 

Caps 
Gowns 
Hoods 

for all Degrees 

ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLER6Y AND CHOIR 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

37 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton. Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Ctated miv tram I A. M >" 4 A 4r" 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Patnolo-y 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated uooklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



OUR RULE 

"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 




Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'd ABsoeiation. 

The College Semite, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association, ( • 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association. 

M. A. C. Catholic Chili, 

Fraternity Conference. 

Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
II. M. Gore, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
>,. W. Hall, Piesideut 

H. L. Holden. Manager 
A. W. Spaulding, Manager 

D. A. Uieker, Manager 
L. Huntington, .Jr., Manager 

N. Moot house, Manager 

H. Aiken, President 

.1. T. Nicholson, Manager 

F. A. Anderson, Manager 

L. E. Fielding, Manager 

F. W. Mayo. Manager 

A. .1. Hicks, President 

E. L. King, President 

C. H. Gould. President 

R. F. Talier. President 



The™ am Se* • I ■ 1 i ***»««•»! voinhculd 
bay your 

COAL 

or 

C. R, ELDER 




RAHARS INN 

Niirthmnptrm. MaaaM JMiseU* 

EUROPEAN FLAX 

III.. III",! I'lHil- lo MM 

limit' r«mii 1'nmmti * ritei AMI i> 
All Kindt of S«a Food 

{•writ l,un«he»r. fi..... I! :*i 11,' p.B. 
Speriwl Di-he» at All Hour* 



R. J. RAHAR, Prop, 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
Canons Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old lieerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Fails and across the 
*» Plains*' to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

SO Miles of Trackage Hodem 
Equipment - Train Dispatch* 
lag System -Freight and E*« 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



DEUEL S DRUG STORE 

vv I M I IX BOOK AG«NTS. 

Both sexes, for best seller published. Particulars 

and outfit free. 
<JKO. W M»MKKS. l-S. SI. AufimtlBf, KU. 

COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 

MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave AOOIE COLLEO.E lor HOL- 
YOKE at 15 mln. past the hour. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. past the hoar. 



Special C«r« at 



Rata* 



KMHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. BY. CO 



Jacob Reed's Sous are the leading manufacturers of 



M 



For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. * 

*4«4-t4?6 Chertnut St., Philadelphia, Pa, 



i 111: TBI*S*i»'V **Al*l-«»»* 

i I. ..i.-ii. a Fr^anlns K*p»lrln K 
..>.n. k, «t tMirvlr*. B*-»t Work, Lowe»t Cri«» 
All woifc carerully done. Work called for awj 
delivered, Genu* overcoats, suits, pant* *na 
coats. Ladies' hne linen suits a specialty 
Teams will call twy day at M. A. L 

WM. rK.lSKI.IN. IVoi. 
RwrNaahBI'k.AmheWl. Tel N *>> 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Co. 

6i 6 Chestnut St ., Philadelphu 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

.....Diamond Merchants... 

Phlladilpkli's Official Ffitifilti Jm* 

SPEOI ALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, NevsltW 
Rings, Charms ...... Prisss. Trc ai« 

Medals ...... College Pins, Feb*. "^ 

Rings, Charms 




S1IM 



Vol. XXVI. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGKICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 7, 1015. 



No. 1 1 



SUNDAY CHAPEL SPEAKER CONFERENCE OF FRATERNITY 

MAKES STRONG APPEAL ALUMNI HAS FIRST MEETING 



Kev. J. S. Durkee Tells Men to Have 

Ambition, but Direct it in 

Right Paths. 

Kev. .1. Stanley Durkee, pastor 
of the South Congregational Church 
nf CampeliO] Mass., delivered a moat 
interesting address on '• Ambition " 
io Chapel Sunday. He said ill 
part: "Ambition is the .spark that 
disturbs our clod if it lie more than 
ilay. 1 pit y the man of no ambition 
.Mil though it in a merciless task- 
master. 'Thrones there are a'plenty 
but they wait for the coming of 
kings.' 

It is time you learned, not from 
the standpoint of theology, bat from 
the standpoint of your own lives, the 
difference between heaven ami hell. 
Lit me sketch it to von. Some 
earl ago there were two boys who 
were constant chums. They were 
-.-filler in all their play. There came 
. time when til*; two had to par!, a 
time whin the choice of the future 
course of life became accessa ry. 
One boy chose the way of ambition, 
chose to devote himself to noble ac- 
niinplishments and Ideals. The 
othfi chose the path of self-gratifica- 
tion. Years have slipped by, one 
man is now a worthless wretch, a 
victim of all that la evil. He has 
made for himself the graveyard of 
hirt soul. The other is your speaker 
■ if the morning, priviledged lo work 
in the interests of humanity, ami to 
enjoy the beauties of art and nature. 
Those are the kind of heavens ami 
lulls people prepare fur themselves. 

"Thin principle will ever hold 

|l i.tllilHKMl Mil pan* St 



LAST OPPORTUNITY TO 

HEAR DR, 5EERLEY 

Dr. Seerley will give the lust of 
series of lectures on Sex Hygiene 
Thursday evening of this week 

Stockbridge ball at #-80 p. m. It 
hoped that a targe number will 

me out to tins lust anil doubtless 

m% in teres ling lecture of tin- Series 
opportunity will be given foe the 
iiH-nl of the subscriptions made 
nig the first of the season i ■>« 
vor to pay nt least part of the 
•nut pledger!. A collection will 



tken at the 



lose 



if til 



part of the amount rnpiired to 
Me these talks possible i any bit 
• may be able to give will lie 

Uv apprecialetl. 



Draws Up Declaration of Purposes. 

An Interfraternity Scholarship 

Cup to be Offered Soon. 

An Important conference of Alumni 
memben of the fraternitiei at M. A. 
C, was held nil Saturday afternoon. 
Dei'. 4. The meeting was called to 
order at :> o'clock in Wilder Hall. 
Prof. F. A. WaUgO was elected chair- 
man and Prof. s. II. Haskell secre- 
tary. The entire fraternity situation 
wag carefully gone over and several 
recommendations made. The most 
important actions were to appoint a 
committee on permanent organiza- 
tion This committer consists of Dr. 
C. \. Peters, K. K. Cillett. Harold 
M. Sore and Prof. V. A. Waugh. 

The conference also made cei tail* 

recommendations regarding college 
relationship?,, faculty reuitionsllips 
and especially on scholarship and 
voted to establish a scholarship cup 
to be <•< 'iiptti'i' for bv tin wivi 1 -i\ 
fraternities. 

One of the most important actions 
vias the liiianiinoiis adoption of a 
"Declaration of Purposes." setting 
forth v« 1 v clearly the established 
policy of the fraternity organisations 
in this college, This "Declaration 
of Purpose" is at follows : 

*• Wilh /» -nfH-i't I,, ihf iitlhy,', it is our 
purpose ; 

I. To support the work of the 
college in nil its departments and 
branches. 

•J. To support the discipline and 
administration of the college. 

3. T«» assist in evei v possible way 
in the maintenance of high stand ids 
and ideals of scholarship, 

4. To co-opirat.- in every po^i, 
b)e way in all proper college activi- 
ties, whether initialed by students, 
alumni, teachers or trustees. 

,*». To assist in all possible wins 
in the development of clean, whole- 
Snmt and healthy social relalirms 
iiiimiy all the students and fat-til t\ of 
the college. 

6. To work for the highest stand- 
ards, of personal responsibility awl 
conduct thioiijfli.Mif the college InhIv. 

7. To safeguard the good name 
of the college in every paifieit; u 

At six o'clock the entire eomp-my 
adjourned to an fnnrfraiernity lwn« 

quet at Dniper Hall, tt IS Wpectetl 
that a not Iter meeting for permanent 

organization wilt lie held early next 
¥8ar,probablv some lime in February. 



HOCKEY SCHEDULE 






SEASON OF IQ15 16. 






1915 


Dec 


20 


-Dartmouth at Arena. 


H 


31 


M. I. T. at Arena. 
1916 


Jan 


8 


R. P. I. at Amherst. 


» 


12 


Yale at New Haven. 


** 


13 


Columbia at Amherst 

spending'. 


*• 


15 


Cornell at Ithaca, 


tn 


19 


Springfield Y. M. C. A 
College at Amherst. 


tt 


22 


Williams at Amherst . 


« 


25 


Harvard atA re na! pending . 


F^b 


5 


Springfield at Springfield. 


H 


11 


M. I.T. at Amherst. 




18 


Columbia at New York. 


♦• 


19 


Army at West Point. 




22 


Williams Hi Wiiiiumstow n. 



ANNUAL BASKETBALL SERIES 
TO BEGIN AFTER CHRISTMAS 

Rules Same as for Last Year. With 
Teams About Even, Hard Con- 
test is Expected. 



tt,..ll 



■erfllJ- 



Jan, 7, the first Friday evening fol- 
lowing the < liristmtiS vacation. The 
siliedule is as follows : 
dan. 7- ItHfi va 1UIC; IU17vs ffI8. 
dan. 1 I Ifltvs I'JIM: |<J17 vs I'.il'.b 
d.-.n. tl— lfl«VS H«I7; P.tlHvH |M|g, 
After midyears the schedule will 
be repeated. The class winning tin* 
greatest percentage of games wins the 

championship of the series. n» in pre- 
vious years. The ollictals for tin 
series will probably be from Auihersl 
college. 

Last year the present three BpJiW 
classes Wei,- tied nut!! the tirinl phiv* 
off. Piaelicallv the same men an 
expecteil in represent the scnmis, 
juniors and MMihu4ttorei numi] lliN 
season. With the material available 
in the freshman class, the Hrst yen 
men should turn out a team which 
would make llie coming series on, .,t 
the most both contested ill vein-,. 



PRO^PFXTS ARE BRIGHT AS 
HOCKEY PRACTICE STARTS 

Good IfuelSUS 11I Li tt. 1 Men Biiek to 

Play Hard Schedule. Fust Game 

Booked for Dei ember BO, 

The l :i I ."1- 1 fi hockey schedule just 
announced 1 • \ Manager Huntington 
consists of fourteen games, two of 
which are as set onH tentative and 
are subject to ratification. The 
season will open with a game against 
Dartmouth at the Arcnn on Dee 2U, 

and on Dec, .11 M, I J\ will be 
played on the mime surface:, provided 
thai satisfactory arrangements can 

lie made with the Arena manage 
i nt* 1 1 1 . Theoiilv big game of hint 
veal that Will |ir<il>ilii\ he missine 

this year is the one with Princeton. 
This Lh due to I lie far) thai the only 
Open date on the I illieetoll schedule 

occurred on an evening when the St. 
Nicholas rink was in use ;<>i I league 
game vThili it hi to be n gretted 
that Princeton cannot l»e I all 

of the 'ern rollegi s will Im> 

jilaveiL 

I lie Harvard date is oub tentative 



KELSEY TO BE DELEGATE 

Lincoln D. Kekey '17 will be the 
student repiiscntalive from If, 
A. ('. at the f. M, (* A. (am 
palgU to he held lit 1 *r| Im**-?i »tl 

I'niversity during this week. The 
campaign is to be in charge of Uav» 
mom! Kobbjns whom the assiamitioii 
of this college is CXpfctillg to c«m 
duct a similar campaign this coming 
spring. Professor Chamberlain and 
.Mr, sherk are also planning to 
attend the campaign. 




( yJUN (in II. I M 

;,.] tin- ( "i niis.,11 plays but II game-, 
this year ium! unless the plan ill 

changed, these will be taken ears ol 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 1915. 



by Princeton, Yale, Cornell, Dart- 
mouth, M. I. T. and a couple of 
Canadian teams. M. I. T. will again 
be the From attraction and Cornell 




INDEX BOARD T O CONDU CT A SCRAMBLE 

Latest Index to Be Placed on Campus in Novel Fashion. Free 
Books to Winners of Contest at Drill Hall. 



The afternoon of Dec. ifi will wit- 
ness the advent on the campus of 
that long looked for drain on your 
pocket book— the 1917 Index. At 
this time, the management will en- 
tertain the student body at a scram- 
ble—the first of its kind in the 
history of the college. Admission 
to this party will be only one "won 



6. Immediately after the scram- 
ble further copies of the Index will 
go on sale at the Collegian ottice, at 
which time the claims of the contest- 
ants will be redeemed. 



PROM SHOW 



Manages Huntington 

will be met for the first time at 
Ithaca. There is sure to be one 
game with Columbia and there is a 
possibility of two games, one of 
them at Amherst. 

The other games are about the 
same as last year except that it has 
seemed wise in view of weather con- 
ditions to have most of the home 
games come in Jiinurrv when the ice 
is best, rather than in February as 
whs the case last year. K. P. I. 
will be played ut Amherst instead of 
at Troy, as wan the case last year. 

The outlook for a team to live up 
to Aggie hockey teams of the past is 
very good. Of last year's letter men 
there are five in college and there are 
a number of candidates for the other 
places. Captain Chisholm, Wooley 
and Kernald are left for the forward 
liue and Ross and Wildon remain for 
the point positions, while Buttrick 
will no doubt grace the cage in his 
championship style. Ross is inel- 
igible at the present time, due to 
troubles with the office, but he may 
be eligible for the second semester. 
There are a number of men in the 
Kreshrnau class who have played in 
and around Boston and who should 
help out the team during the second 
semester. There will also be a 
Freshman team and the athletic office 
is arranging a schedule of games for 
the same. 

As soon as there it ice enough the 
team will be out on it, which should 
be soon if the present weather holds. 
While Captain Archibald and the 
speedy .Johnson will be missed, yet 
there are prospects of building up a 
very strong seven. 



Several plays are now tinder con- 
sideration by the management of the 
man," which will apply on the retail j Roister Ooisters to be used for the 
price of the book, $2.50. This proffi proc iuction- These plays are 
price, according to the Index Board. a „ running at tue present time either 
was found to be the lowest possible iQ Bobton or New Vo , k . 0ne of the 
to charge for so magnificent an ar- probabIe selections is "Baby Mine," 
tide as the newest Index. For one 
year the college has waited for this 
hook, which is said to be well worth 
waiting two for. A nobby stiff 
leather cover, stamped in gold, se- 



by the author of "Twin Beds." 
Another is "Under Cover," by 
Magstic. If it should be possible to 
make the necessary arrangements 
with the management, the Roister 
curely binds the biggest bundle of i , )o j 8ter8 wi „ 8ecure .. Twin n e ds," 

one of the best comedies now play- 



surprises the student hotly has seen 
for years. Six absolutely new 
features is the promise of the Board, 
with at least five features that have 
not appeared in Indexes for years. 
Do yon know how M Paul Revere 
Really Did It?" Could you tell of 
whom the personnel of the Athletic 
Association is made up? Do you 



ing. Rehearsals for the new show 
will probably begin very soon after 
the final selection of a play is made. 



SILVER FOOTBALLS 

At Wednesday's assembly. Birch- 
aid '17 brought up the matter of giv- 



Candidates for the College Debat- 
ing team have been called out. All 
men who wish to try out are asked to 
hi Professor Smith of the English 
department. There are to be several 
intercollegiate debates this year as 
well as the college debate. All men 
with any ability art urged to try f or 
the team. 



want to see the athletic teams in an 
absolutely different make-up? 8oi 
the "Ziegfield Beauty Chorus," and 
"Aggie 4, Spriugfield SI" Tickets 
now on sale at one dollar. 

RULES OK THK S< ItAMIU I 

1. The Scramble will be held 
Wednesday, Dec. l. r >, at 4-15. 

_'. Kach contestant must have 
purchased a ticket from some mem- 
ber of the Index Board. 

3. All men entering must hand 
their names to the president of the 
Senate or to the business manager 
of the Index, before noon of that 
day. 

4. The Scramble will be con- 
ducted as follows : 

The contestants will be lined up 
by the president of the Senate on the 
campus slope approximately fifty 
yards below the pit. 

At the drat gun the contestants will 
rush straight up over the pit for the 
north End of the Drill Hall. At the 
second gun a window in the north 
end of the Drill Hall will be opened 
and the l>ooks will be given out, one 
l.v one as fast as they are secured 
by any of the contestants. The 
lapse of time between the first and 
aecond shot will be thirty seconds. 

Twenty books will be passed out 
in all. The first three and the last 
one will be free, the dollar previously 
paid being refunded. 

Each book will bear the autograph 
of either President Bntterfield or 
that member of the faculty to whom 
the book is dedicated. 

5. The right is reserved by Phys- 
ieal Director Hicks to stop the 
scramble at any time by two soooea- 1 
si vc shots of the gun. 



ing little siivci foot bulls to the mem- 
bers of the football team who had 
made their letter this season. The 
proposition was referred to a com- 
mittee consisting of Dodge '16 and 
Bir hard and Smith '17. The com- 
mittee has dedded to purchase ster- 
ling silver footballs, suitably en- 
graved, the cost being approximately 
$.'1 each. A tax of ten cents per 
man, voted at the last assembly, will 
be collected after the Foiuni tomor- 
row, to be used in buying these 
remembrances for the team. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

fioniinu.-'i tram !««•■ i| 



true: 'Crown the right, the good, 
the pure and the true, and the evil, 
the bad, the false, will slink and 
slide and hide away.' 'Stronger 
than the dark the light, stronger than 
the wrong the right.* Yon are elect- 
ing a ruler, and the ruler that yon 
elect will become your master. You 
will become an absolute servant of 
your profession. Whom shall yon 
elect to be the king over your life? 
There is only one rider fit to be the 
king and he is Jesus Ctuist, a trans- 
lation of God. God was metaphysi- 
cal, far away, we couldn't under- 
stand him ; but Jest's Christ came 
and repeated one word, 'Father,' 
and then God meant something to 
as, we could see His true position. 
God is the only one fit and big 
enough to rule your life and thoughts. 
Elect Him and then the passing 
years will bring all the finest, and 
richest . and truest to be laid at yonr 
feet because yon have been t rue to 



PROFESSOR GRANT GIVES 

SECOND BIBLE LECTURE 

Continues Series on History and De 
velopment of Hebrew People. 
Prof. Elihu Graut of Smith col 
lege continued his lectures on tin 
Bible Thursday evening before the 
college Y. M. C. A., discussing at 
1 ngth the history of the ancient 
Hebrews. He said, in part: "It i- 
one of the miracles of the world that 
we have received such large contri 
buttons from little states, small couo 
tries like Palestine and Greece. Tbi 
big contributions of the former were 
the Hebrew prophets and the spirit 
ual genius of the teachers. The\ 
have infused the world with their 
dominant spirit. It was during tin 
lull in the almost continual strife 
between the large countries al>out 
1000 B. C. that Palestine got its 
start. While the more powerful 
peoples like Syria were busy with 
internal troubles, this little land 
united itself under King Saul. The 
union lasted only 7-> years, however. 
At that time the laud was divided 
afterwards into Israel and Judah. 
By 086 B. C. both had been swal- 
lowed up by larger powers. Tl» 
Hebrew prophet, nevertheless, still 
continued. Every country had its 
prophets, but none could be com- 
pared with those of the Je%% 
Among them we find such men as 
Elijah, Samuel, .lohn the Bnptist and 
even Jesus Christ— all men of dlvini 
lire, oracular, full of frensied pur- 
pose. Hebrew prophecy grew out of 
the muck and mire of a very low, un 
seemly beginning. Even in Samuel 
we see a primitive type of religion. 
(Jradually. however, improvement 
was made until we come to the m 
nearly perfect religion of the lain 
prophets. All of the men were in 
tcivnting characters. Uuncompi- 
mising resorters to ordinary things, 
unpopular, and lonely, they were 
looked upon as beings of sacred in. 
iiiunitv . men who really represented 
some divine power, men who aliouM 
be feared." 

Professor Grant of Smith colhp 
will give the the third of the series o( 
talks on "Bible History" on Dec I 
A food deal of valuable informatton 
is being given at these talks and 
will be worth your while to take »«• 
vantage of this opportunity. 



FLORICULTURE TRIPS 

As a part of the the regular cours* 
work, students of Junior Ftericulin 
in charge of Professor Kehrling si. I 
Mr. Thnraton are making a series of 
inspection trips to nearby gre»i 
houses. Last Friday Sinclair's 
400 ft. bouse at Smith Ferry w 
inspected and a study made off 
Hi tchinga type of construction 
well aa the heating system, crops at 
cultural methods. On Monday aft* 
noon the range of Butler and ifllros 
in Northampton was visited an 
detailed stndv of heating.crops.vo 
ii It ura I me tin mI* B» 



eties and c 
the right and highest motives that .Several other nips are 

planned. 



i Ii:inc com. Into yonr lives. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 191 5. 



MUSICAL CLUBS TO GIVE 

CONCERT IN H0LY0KE 

Will Appear Next Friday Evening 

Under Auspices of Holyoke 

High School. 

The combined musical clubs of the 
. ollege will make their first appear- 
ance of the season at a concert to be 
held in the Holyoke High School Fri- 
day e veiling. Rehearsals for the 
glee and mandolins clubs, the orches- 
tra and the quartet have been fre- 
quent and regular, and what prog- 
ress has been made will be seeu when 
the clubs meet Wednesday evening 
in the auditorium for a full rehearsal 
of the entire program which has been 
arranged for Friday's concert. 

Following the resignation of Nelson 
I '. Blanpied *16 as leader of the glee 
olub, James T. Nicholson 'Hi has been 
selected to fill the position. In co- 
operation with Professor Bigelow 
»f Amherst, the coach of the clob, 
Mr. Nicholson has been working up 
several excellent numbers. The man 
dolin club has been hard hit by eligi- 
liilitv rules, but is by no means be- 
low standard for this season of the 
year. The college orchestra, under 
I. ami's leadership is the best ever 
produced at M. A. C. without •xotp< 
tion, and thev will play a prominent 
part in the program in addition to 
furnishing music for dancing after 
rlie concert. The selections which 
will be used this year in the concert 
will be classical music, a notable 
iiaup from the ragtime always 
teed in other seasons. 

Coach Bigelow and Xicholaou have 

I t O — the quartet for the year, its 

personel befog ! First tenor, Swnn 

W! ; second tenor. Little 'Hi: first 

Iiiiks. Worth ley 'I*; second bass, 

Lawrence '17. 

In addition to the regular members 
of the program, features will pa 
solos by Harlan N . Worthies 'l*. and 
1 sjiecialty which has not yet been 
Kinoiinced definitely, together with | 
■ StbU «cleclion by a reader. 
The program as drawn up for the 
Holyoke concert will probably be 
ncbanged on the Christmas trip. 
As fast year, the clubs will give aev- 
d concerts in and around Boston 
'lie week after Christmas. The 
liedule of engagements as arranged 
Manager Anderson consists of 
appearances. The first of these 
- 'he concert and ball to be given at 
Copley Pla/.a. Boston, on the 
• mug of Tuesday Dec. 2B. A 
mplete announcement of details 
•ncerning this conceit Is found in 
•tiler column. It will be the feat- 
e appearance of the entire trip, pro- 
led only it is well supported by 
»iudettts,for it Is to be practically 
Aggie affair atone, Wednesday 
«ning Dec, 29, a concert will be 
n in Hingham and on the after- 
•11 of the :>0lh the clubs will per- 
m it a tea in the Filene restaur- 
nt. A concert is scheduled for the 
uing of the same day at Waltham, 



where such a successful affair was 
held last year. The final entertain- 
ment of the trip will be held in New- 
burvpoit Friday evening Dec. 31, 
and promises to be not the least im- 
portant. Details are being arranged 
by "War" Little '13. 

The names of those making the 
Holyoke trip will be posted Thursday 
on the musical clubs bulletin, North 
College and the men will leave the 
crosswalks on the 6-15 car for 
Hoi yoke. 



GEORGE A. DREW '07 

SPEAKS AT ASSEMBLY 
Well Known Pomologist Sets Forth 
Advantages of Fruit Growing. 
George A. Drew, M. A. C. 18U7, 
gave the Assembly address Wednes- 
day in the Auditorium, taking for his 
subject the "The Possibilities of 
Fruit Growing in Massachusetts." 
In part, be said : 

A great country life movement has 
sprung up in the last decade ami I 
beHeva that fruit glowing can con- 
tribute to the advancement of this 
new rural idea. New Kngland is rich 
in opportunities for fruit growers and 
in all my II years experience and 
study, I have concluded that this part 
of the country is better adapted to 
raising fruit than even the western 
coast, which has made such remarka- 
ble progress in the last few veara, 
Wc hnve the suitable climate and soil, 
the markets that ate near consuming 
people, and the roads that lead to 
these markets. We have all the 
natural qualifications, but lack the 
business enterprise and cooperation. 
We have the advantages but fail to 
grasp them. 

There are two ways for a young 
man to start fruit growing: first, he 
must obtain practical work ; or he must 
teach the subject. In this way, he 
goes through the ap|>enticeship stage 
that is as valuable to him as the col- 
lege course. It is no reflection on a 
man's college if he fails at fruit grow- 
ing, for after graduation he must 
learn the art of doing the work him- 
self and understand the minute details 
of this wcu pat ion. It is far better 
to make mistakes under somebody 
else than when working for yourself, 
but your aim should eventually be to 
run your own business. 

For the New England fruit grower, 
here are some of the principal points 
to consider in selecting an orchard 
site 1 first choose the land with great 
care ; co isider the proximity to a good 
market ; and look well at the new 
cnniraanity, A new man makes a big 
mistake in planting many varieties. 
.Stick to a few standard types that 
are popular, Produce in volumes 
and make all parts pay. 

In other walks of life the competi- 
tion is keen. Fruit growing is in its 
infancy in New England. It offers a 
chance for an in depend ent life and an 
opportunity to be a leader in some 
community. You can develop your 
own resources and at the same time 
help others. 



MANY CANDIDATES OUT 

FOR HOCKEY MANAGER 
The call for candidates for assist* 
ant managers of varsity hockey, which 
was given last Wednesday, brought 
out a large number of men. The fol- 
lowing men are out: Marshall, W. 
Lawyer, Sullivan, Hitter, van Alstyne, 
McNaught, Huntoon, Edes, Hulburt, 
and Hance, all of whom are members 
of the class of 1918, These men 
have already started in with their 
competition work, as the varsity 
hockey squad has been practicing in 
the Drill ball since last week and had 
its first practice on ice Mondav. 



An Especially (food Commission Propotlt Ion- 
Cash for test orders— Article widely Advertised— 
Cuts down expense in power Hants— Address 
F.NolNF.KKINi; SUFPLV CO., M38 N. Qth Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Holyoke Valve £ Hydrant Co. 

jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe. Valves 
»nd Fittings for Steam, Water and Ga». Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler aad Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. Engireers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and P.ngipe 



Connections. 



ngire 
Holyoke, Mas*. 



iticriv.M \\\s 

Candies and Ice Cream 



•« I I -\ M I * »• 



JUNIOR PROM 

May be Held at Nonotuck. 
The faculty committee on student 
life has passed favorably on the pro- 
posal of the 1917 Junior Prom Com- 
mittee to hold the prom in the ball- 
room of the Hotel Nonotuck, Hol- 
yoke. While this is a new plan and 
has not been definitely arranged for 
as yet, it is expected to meet with 
approval. One regulation submitted 
by Professor Robbins of the Non-Ath- 
letics Committee requires that at least 
thirty tickets be sold and paid for 
one week before the prom. 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty— And other good.'things to eat. 

MRS. L. M. 5TEBBINS, 
Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. 



Tel. 415 w 



DR. R. 



C. 

Dentist 

NASH'S BLOCK 

Evenings by Appointment. 



hold Ularren 

South Deerfield, Masa. 

T. *J. AHERN, MANAGER 



Burpee's Seeds 



are supplied every year 
direct to mure Ameri- 
can planters than are 
the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914,— a bright new book of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 



QKe'fii 



hoe Store 



NOTICE = 

Bitf surprise for M. A. C. men at our store! 

Don't buy Footwear till you see us 

Wei'AIRIN^- Double-wear Leather used. 



School and College Photographers . 




LOCALLY: 



Main Office: 

1 546-1 548 Broadway, 

New York City 



5a Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mast. 

Then Studios offer the beat .skilled 
artists and moat complete 

equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



■DEALERS IM- 







Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Pec. 7, 19* 5 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 1915 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

published ever,i TuasJrj ev«nln« 
by Hie Student* ul the M:i--a<hti- 
ge tti \-ii- ultural 1 uiieiie. 

BOABD OF EDITORS, 

TVI.Ki; B <:•>■. I i:.- 'li. Kililiii in < "lil'-f 

RICH m:I' W SMITH II Maaaglwi Ktfltm 
lit \\i\ 1 -< in ■' 1 ' 1 ' "•• lMtat»ni K.iin., 

, HOH t. H x KH«"K ••- " Uhl-rttr Editor 

A.LFKKD V OIUIIW * ] " UtaHWfc Mhol 

uwioiti 1 BAKSKS le. ttamnt Kdittn 

M1LFORD H 1 HA 11 Si i '" N "'« < ■-'" ,1 " 

l.l.l.lol HKSIHCIWON I' "' i"' : 

\Ml. 1,1AM -AMM I ...n: 11 «,.„,<,. Lilt.. 

MMi«n \i 1 0. LASFflKAB 1- Awo'eErtltoi 
BtJSlNKSS i>i I'ARTMI NT 

. II AH A. Ill MIV'.lHN-.IU.'lt. 

lUtHilifeH HMMfW 

MERU11 1 i- <R u;m.i;it 

\.,isi..iii Wmw M.uiuitpr 

I.KHTEU K, Kill l>i>' 

JA.MKS < I, fOT i -LI I*. 1 iriulati..n 



Subscript i"n tl.fitt per year. BlBgle 
iMjple*, g eeuto. M bl all order* paya- 
ble lol HAW KB \ 111 STIM4TOS, JM 



lnr.-i.-laawri'liil dW miUtT WH In- \lnhnJ1t 
OflH *•■ 

Vol. XXVI. Tuesday, Dec. 7. No. 11 



Tin recent meeting <»f graduate.-. 
trom the various fruternilie* repf»* 
Mated in this I'nlli'gf for the di-Miis- 
ttioij of loterfnitrlliitv relation* here 
nuii'ks the Mi Hi of a new movement 
toward the establishing of a better 
fraternity h|>itit ami more cordial feel- 
nig*, atnoiiij the noeletlH. It i« %uHm 
fitting and altogether deairsWe ttal 
the graduates ihould uudei take this 
movement, For they ure mori dee of 

|»re'ju<liee, 11 -ore QfKfi minded, mid 

have a better per»|»etiv« <rf the mxnm- 

tion tlian the lUiileigiadnatef., 'I*he 
need of some inch me#ltag has bt« 
felt for a long lime; the work whit li 
it may d<» i«> exteii-he : and the result* 
whieh are hoped for wilt benefit the 
college in many way*.. It is note- 
worthy that theii dielaiation of jiur- 
pose iiidieateM thai then object is to 
work for tin- tntereaiof the w»Ih5pa SS 
a whole. The peniianeiit organiza- 
tion of this eoiiftieiiif will establish 
a highly dealt able, factor for the im- 
piovemertl of undergraduate relation*. 

That 2i) |ieiei-iit of the men in a 
college carry W H " perotttl of the 
undergraduate luuvitiws, is prover- 
bial but that thin stun, of affairs is 
the ideal one is liutdly granted. 
When we here at M A C, look 
about us ami we the men who are 
doing the Major portion tif Ihe work 
connected with extra itmiriilum 
ueUvities*, wi- are -uiipu-eil and per* 
iiai»s pained that so f*m njen tlo m 
inueh work. We are inclined to nay 
that all the howwii ihotlkl not go 1*, 
the chosen few, out ifaouhl he dlvwled 
aiiiong the niniis Tree is tfei* ttale- 
nieiit ih. then It « faop« of its real- 

izatioti until eveiy iiiau w ho In -nils 
the 1 auipiis daily i» billing to do bin 
share of the work i-num-i-ied with all 
of the rarloui atMetii >nd non* 

Hthletie uiti\itii-- Tlnue )« mi dolilit 

but that there itu men jnrtaa well 
ijuulitied for poaittetti of Irnat and 

it \ :,« ill.- i j vi 1 worked ones 



who now hold them, but they will not 
give either of their time or ability. \ 
Thev present various excoM*, either 
they ate too busy, or they have to 
itudy or thes don't want to bother or 
give some other of the thousand and 
one cm uses that the lazy man can 
find for shirking his duty. Laziness 
in the majority of eases is the real 
reason why men of ability are not 
trying foi college honors. It is not 
usually study for we find that such 
men are not exceptional students. It is 
not the necessity of working- tor tin- 
men who earn their way are often the 
most energetic in activities. It is 
the desire to sitaround and rem! such 
illuminating literature as Ihe Como- 
polUun or publications of its type 
that makes mm sluggards and para- 
sites on the body politic of the col- 
lege. For sueh men in the upper 
, Imssc there is little hope for their hab- 
its are formed and they cannot change 
them. Hut for the underclassmen, 
now is the time for action, (iet out 
for something and if you get licked. 
tiy again. Although studies are par- 
amount, the average man at Aggie 
has time for something else also. 
He can who thinks he can. 

T. 1.. 11. 



day, they will be 82, 

The committee especiallv requests 
the men who are taking Smith girls 
to sign up for the special car. Also, 
to let the Smith and Mt. Ilolyoke 
girls know who the chaperons are 
from their respective colleges, as they 
have to call on them prior to the 



informal. 



ASSISTANT MANAGERS 

Chambers and Chapman *18 Chosen 

after Football Competition. 

At u meeting of the athletic com- 
mittee, held last week. Roger .). 
Chambers of Dorchester, and .John 
A. Chapman of Salem, were chosen 
assistant managers of football. Iloth 
are members of the class of 1918. 
Chambers will be manager of the 
freshman team, and Chapman will be 
assistant manager of the varsity. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

\,,ti, m fin tlii« i'mIuiiiu ulioultl bi* ilrii|i|H-il In 
,t ,)„. i, ,111. .its ..niifur Imtiitfii to Williiiin 
Sin i'U-. ,h 11 m ••! IhI.io- ttifMHiiriluy pnMd- 
liwemi-h ImmJ 

Wl hm -i' |r1 . !»».. t. 
i-lli e. M. — \s,«cinl*ls . S-lmieiil Fo|'UIIl 
j (Ml c. u. (toOtot liel-Tnuelller, Mneial 

I nluti, 

I ih issn v^ , l)i« !i 
( ;:;o cm N M < \ nieelim,',eloi|»el. 

r'niow, Dkc, 111. 
|U*W v. M. Mulion JMetiirc* Audi- 
forltjin. 

S \ n itu v\ , I)k< , 11, 
3-;',U i\ B. Iiiiormal, l'rill Hall. 

S|!Mhv, l»n . W, 
:« 1. s m Snmbiy f hap. I, I'n.l. Waller 

Uam-eheliliush. Unelie-ier. 

S ^ 
•i-Mf, M.-(ilHel'lu!»KeheiirMal.iliapel, 

1 1 i in vv, iH'e 14. 
•i-;U) I'. M.- Stoekbriilu'e < "Mil*. Sl'iek- 

Iun1-.e Hall, It.H.m 114. 
♦i-4ai- M i.lee Club Uelieanwil . chapel, 

\\ I n\ Mnu , Hi i IB, 
1-MI e, M. - .\— eiiililv, Hon. Klmi't A. 
*»le\**fis, IkmtiiH. 
III! Us|i% V. l»Kt , 10. 

MP. M. V M C, A.mreliiiu.ehapel, 

Piiin\\ . Ul i I". 
I, ihi e m IVlater reeeM beali»». 

M..M. w. .1 IN. it, ItHii. 

i.]u c. a.— Winter mvtm etta* Hes-u- 

l,o neiiedule ul ilasscj,. 



HE LAVAL 

SEPARATOES 

Save in 
7 Ways 

gUANHU ,,,,,„ „,il ti-i.m-I .oiniilfO-li 

nilAI ITV "i ■TM.ni a* widen''" 1 '• 0* 
t|UAUM |„,,;,||.iiOii al»iOs«i'«ir1m- lnuli 
,-st iiii'ii'i) iiiUHirliint i-iiiiipsr. 

I ADHD '» •■'''■> w«U. Ii» omiiui- i 
LADUn |„.), ltf uiiii|,i,T, MM«r i» i ii'ii n :nnt 
riiniirinir m. ml iii*liii»iif. 

Tiyc |,> lii,ur«, ii\ ii fi"i ni l:m. ii. i '.I 
IISL |,(,i((i ;,tnl tin- ■iltllf '""in- ll'-il 

8a%f L»li..r 

ancT Hinn« whilt? ■ i» i*%,ii bisi .-I i 
mOoi littii- num. tiiiiu ii m*n •• iiiiii"i ui 

1,,-iiiti ailli. ii will IhiiI I'ri'iii O-n tn Im-iilj 
ji-.«r«. »ini»- iiiiii-i wimnilor* wf*r nal mm 

iriiullf In In* r»*|. l,n **il in (nilll "in* In 'in* 
inr», 

DDflCIT in imio* iml iniHi ifit in. «itb 
r nurl I ,,,„ ,.,!,,„ .,,„| ,.ii„rt. 

StTiecifTiny »• tti«-i» -•»noai» «onn- tmm 
AllOrAullUn knnwini* Jim li.oi- On* ih-*i 
.,,((i.iini, and an si all nun-* ;n<.>ni 

(•iiallilltt I III' tK'*! INi^^lhli- FaMlMi 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

\m Broadwrnr Vmm York 

m k. mj»»ii«.»ii st.. csteaso 



CHRISTMAS VACATION BEGINS 
DEC, 17 

Therefore, there remains only a fev 
days in which to select a 

"FARM MANUAL" 

as a present for yourself, father Oi 
uncle. We have them all. 

JOHNSON BOOK CO 

85 Pleasant Street. 
R. A. Mooney H. W. Bishop 

QNITY CHURCH 

Nokth Plkasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Kaith. 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

i;M,IHi: SINOAV SKKVICK AT 7 I* >l 



I OW PRICE T»ILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDEK 
Suits Cleaned, Pressed and Dyed All kindsut 
Keuairihs fur Ladies an-i Gentlemen neatlv d i • 
Hii*h>rrade work bv first class tailor. Work 
called lor and delivered. Sell tickets fo. preMin-J 

4 SUITS FOH >IW 

GEORGE KOrOWITI, P"OP 

Main Street, Amherst. Mass Nash Hlock 

Itn vour way to the Po*l I tibtm I el. (]B W 

E. E. MILLETT 

jl*.\\ i l IK and OPTOMETRISl 

Leuse* ground white ?ou wait 

i ..I I t .-!■ JEWELKV 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar String* 

Willi i:-l MASS, 
Neat to Hoit Dffice. 



Amherst 



GO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Gradt Collegt Work 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Shirts, 
Collar*, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry. 



io 15c 
t l-JC 
2 l-IC 

4& per Hoz 
30c per fin/ 



DRY CLEANIHG AHD PRESSIHG 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dfy Cleaning and Pressing, li.jc a Suit 



Northampton 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

ci kk an & DYER, Prt^. 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
— Pena— 



INFORMAL 

Satnidiiy, Dpi:. 11, i« the dale Ml 
for tin- next informal. Porter's 
ori'lH'strii will supply tli* 1 music. 
D'HH-iiig will U'gin lit (-80, nml Inst 
iinlil S-80 M iisiuil. Thr Smith 
thiiprroiiM aie ,\Ii'«. IlilHlig« of ('Im- 
pin llon.-H" mid Mrs. (iurrett of H 
[ttlmoiit Am-. The Mt. Ilolyoke 
elinpLiiHiB will W announced Inter. 
I Icket* mny be ohtnined from Pal- 
iiiii, K00111 ;i South ("ollcge for SI, ai» 

u|j to Thursday night; after Thtif*** j 



Strfmkn Lank Imh.hbr 

MANt'fjkcriTTlllto ,n«i:o" 
ISOIIWUDWAV. NKW VOHK 

t 1. 1 )\ \Ni» t iu,r.|-,«i« 
1MNH AND KIN*Ci« »* 

-1IM.O. P»IT.T«W *HT» HWorrSR MBIULS 

S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 



R.T.FinnT.Afniit. D -Mir kihyam, Awt.Af*n« 
— •—■ Try our lldtM I] stem 

Put Ml name and address on laundr j 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the FlorlcuKural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of t »' 
flowers »nd plants at reasonabk- 1 
to students and faculty. This st- k 
is grown in modern houses ut 
ideal conditions. Roses, caman>-' 5. 
violets, chrysanthemums and 11 
^as in season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Ttilophan* S«0 



WEBS' 



N'.,w .1 



PI 



t>' I'M 

urateU Ke| la •• 

mplW and ikiily iK |).ne 

Sktitlartiiin I ■ iiaranttBKl 



sken ! t*t 



Everything in Photography 

Including Framing, 
(lood wof* speaks fw ItseH 
Nash B^k, Amherst, % 



EATH OF EXTENSION 

PROFESSOR FERGUSON 

■ i lege Extension Service Loses Effic- 
ient Organizer and Economist. 

It. Hay Ferguson, for the past two 

uiH Extension Professor of Ami- 

Itural Economics in the Massachu- 

tta Agricultural college, died at his 

\tiilierst home Dee. 1 , after a three 

inths* illness for which nn operation 

ni Springfield three weeks ago failed 

to firing relief. 

lie was bora in Belfast, Ireland, 
•"••[it. "22, 1870, af lei w.n rd moving to 
Ni-w Zealand where he spent the 
greater part of his life. He gradu- 
irtsd from Canterbury university, 
after which he taught in the schools 
nf that eotinlrv for several vears. 
He lieeaine much interested in ami nn 
:iiilliorit\ on the subject of Agricul- 
tural Cooperation, for which that 
country is noted. He was also a linn 
believer in and Mippoiter of Kqual 

Suffrage, 

Me came to this country in 1911, 
entering the Ontario Agricultural col- 
lege from which hegiaduutcd in l'.M,'! 
Specialising in Agricultural Kconoui- 
ies, After graduation he taught 
Agriculture and Kconoutica in the 
Harrisonburg, Virginia, Normal col- 
lege, resigning this position to uc- 
■ ept the one held until his death in 
the Extension Service of the &faa«&- 
hnsetts Agricultural College. His 
special field of work in Massachusetts 
was Co-operative Exchanges and 
Marketing. 

The increased interest in Farmers* 
Co-operative movements in Massa- 
chusetts, and a number of successful 
Co-operative Exchanges organized 
under Professor Ferguson's direction 
testify his chosen profession. He 
evolved a rural credit system which 
has lieeu acceptulile to hankers, farm- 
ers, and federal authorities Interested 
in this line of work. 

He was married to IJolurm On. who 
Mil vivei him. He also leaves a 
mother, Mia. Elizabeth Ferguson of 
H ".tings Hawkesllay. New Zealand ; 
' three brothers snd one sister 
in that country. The funeral service 
wai held at the home in Amherst last 
fit. lay. Interment was in Wildwood 

"meter V. 



FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 

Manager Chisholm of the Fresh- 
1 H Basketball team snnsuBces the 
1 Wthall schedule for the coming 

• 11 ; 

&— Smith Aggies at Northamp- 
ton 

1 1*2 — Hopkins Academy nt Had- 
ley 
If,— M onsen Academv nt H»d- 

ley 
H — EnslbHinpton High nt Kusl- 
h.'implon 
1 t».9— Deerfield A eademy at Deer- 
field 
I— Connecticut Literary Insti- 
tute at Sullleld 
Jf^ — Willu aham Academy at 
Wilbraham 



ATHLETIC FIELD FUND 

PUBLISHES CALENDAR 

An Official Publication of the Col- 
lege, Interesting to Students 
and Alumni. 

This is the first year that the col- 
lege has ever had an otlicial calendar. 
It is published in the interests of the 
Alumni Athletic Field Fund. Kveiy 
Calendar that the undergraduates and 
alumni buy means so much extra sup- 
port to this new field. 

The calendar contains on twelve 
pages forty-eight pictures represent- 
ing the campus buildings, walks, var- 
ious varsity teams, captains and man- 
agers. The frontispiece i* a photo- 
gravure of the New Stock bridge 
Hall and has been touched up with 
watei colors. This picture alone is 
worth the price of 11.00, which is the 
total cost of the new maroon leather 
covered publication. In regard to 
this maroon leather H by 10 cover, 
there is imhossed across the top 
'"Massachusetts," under which aie 
the numerals '•I'.Hfi" on cither side 
of the new college seal. 

Those who saw the Springfield 
game here have a chance to sec a 
picture of the squad that beat their 
old rivals 14 to 13, and also the team 
in action against Colhy on the 
Alumni Field, 

There an ' S (H> of these caiandcrs 
and the Alumni Field Fund needs the 
support of all Aggie men. Calen- 
dars will be mailed prepaid by send 
ing unme and address with 9I.*M» to 
Curry S. Hicks or Harold T. Whit- 
nev '16. 



CAMPION 



Fine 



Tailoring 



DRAMATICS REORGANIZED 

Nicholson Re-elected President of 

Roister Doister Society, 

The Roister Doister Dramatic soci- 
ety has recently been reorganized on 
I lit in basis for the future. It will 
no longer be an executive society 
admitting as members all who pay 
dues, but membership will be honor- 
ary and will tlejiend on a certain 
amount of dramatic talent. The 
officers elected for this year are as 
follows: President and genera! man- 
ager, James T. Nicholson ; treaiurer 
ami business manager, Arthur F. 
Williams; secretary ami advertising 
manager, William Haville, Jr. The 
assistant managers have not yet been 
chosen, but will be in the near future 
as the result of the competition. At 
the next meeting of the Roister Doii- 
ters distinctive insignia will be 
adopted and a new constitution, now 
in preparation, will be ratified. 



NUMERALS AWARDED 

The lyia Atiilelic Board has 
awarded numerals to the following 
men for work on the football team 
this fall: Poole (captain), Whittle, 
Mausell. K. Wood, K. Day, Cooley. 
Bond, C. Hlancharcl and Chase 
(manager). Hall Carpenter re- 
ceived numerals for erons country, 
he being the winner of the inlet-class 
race. 



COLLEGE OUTFITTEE- 



Ready-To-Wear Clothes 

For Christmas Suggestions! Woolle\ i<>. Agent, .) South College 
A line oi samples always nti hand. 




A SHEPARD 

MEN'S 



Use Our New Cash Discount Card and Save Five Per Cent 

ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 

Come to ua for 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Faint 

Clothes and Shoe Brashes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



FREE 



tx. E. E 



For a few days only here's your chance to get 

FREE 

With a 90c Humidor of Tuxedo Tobacco, a 
GENUINE FRENCH BRIAR 

PIPE 

SKIC THEM TN THE WINDOW 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexatl Store— On the Corner 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 1915. 



1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 191 5. 



J. GINSBURG 

11 1-2 Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

75C Special Half Sole, Rubber 75c 

HBI'AIHINO 

Black, Tan, White Work Guaranteed. 

i»hicic» 

Rubber Soles ...... • !.»« 

Kubber Soles, with Heeli . . »l.75 

Soles Sewed, **• 

•i'i shluiK for mini 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Mock, Amherst. Mass. 

Office Hours : 9 to ia A. m., 130 to (, r. M. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone $n— R 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 
Windows, Lead Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS. 



You'll Want a New Suit for Christmas 

Select it today. The new styles in Autumn and Winter patterns await 
your inspection. You will want a stylish, comfortable SUIT or OVER- 
COAT. Step in and examine our line. Style is the addition to the latest 
fashion, to your individual need. Custom clothes are designed for YOU. 
not simply cut to fit the stocky sized man. Out Gents' Furnishings Line is of 

The Latest Goods in Shirts and Collars 

Kid Gloves, all styles New Dress Vests at very reasonable prices 



All. KINDS OK KkPAlK WORK NKAII V A\l> PROMPTLY DON! 



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ALTERINO 



CLEAN INC, 



PRESSING 



LABROVIT21 



Custom Tailor 



11 AMITY ST. 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 



the mmt economical you can usr 

BetteR CROPb 

are the inevitable result. 




uS^ 



THE ROGERS tt HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

• Mtii. Mini Wink", l*orllmul, Conn. 



ARRANGEMENTS COMPLETED 
FOR COPLEY PLAZA DANCE 

Guarantee of $200 Necessary to In- 
sure Success. 

Complete plans have been arranged 
to have a concert and dauce in the 
Copley Plaza, Dec. 28. The hall has 
been secured, the musical clubs are 
well trained and the college orchestra 
is ready to furnish a high order of 
dance music from 10 p. m. to 2 A. M. 
The students have signed pledge pa- 
pers to buy 100 tickets at $1.50 each. 
From all indications Aggie is to have 
one of the biggest social events ever 
attempted by the college in the city 
of Boston The Non-Athletics board, 
however, lays down this one condi- 
tion — that in order to have the Copley 
Plaza conceit and danee, 8200 worth 
of tickets must be sold on the cam- 
pus before vacation. Otherwise, the 
entire function must be dropped. 
One hundred tickets have already 
been pledged to students, from which. 
if all aie purchased, 8150 will be 
realized. The rest will be easy. If 
any mau has friends at home who are 
going, the management asks that he 
get their check from them before va- 
cation and buy on the campus. Tick- 
ets may be oblaimed from Ander- 
son '10 and Henderson '17. In case 
an immediate purchase is out of the 
question, the management will he 
'.dad to make arrangements for a de- 
livery of tickets at a more favorable 
time. 

TWl concert and dance has been 
talked about for four weeks; arti- 
cles have been published in the news- 
papers concerning it ; aud the stu- 
dent body has signified its intention 
of supporting it. The management 
is not anxious to drop it now after 
so much publicity and free advertis- 
ing, especially when the undergradu- 
ate* as a whole are Ratisfed that it 
will bfl ■ wonderful time. The musi- 
cal clubs desire individual support 
and backing, which means buying 
tickets earlv before vacation. 



class, date, and number of words 
each article. 



1917 
F. G. Edwards 
J. Whitney 
J. T. Dizer 

N. W. Gillette 
I). S. Francis 
F. J. Hinks 
W. S. Sawyer 
C. T. Smith 
K. N. Mitchel 
C. T. Mower 

1919 
F. Shenkelberger 
E. M. IlufTura 
M. F. Evans 



8.7 

10.9 

1.0 

21.9 

M 

5. 

4.4 

.7 

10.4 

2.7 

1. 

7.4 

7.3 



COPLEY SQUARE HOTEL 

Huntington Ave., EJWtW and Klagden Sta„ Boston, Mass. 
Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

AMOS H. WHIPPLE. .•.,<>. • 



C*rpfivlcr & Morehous>, 



j 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mim. 



Now is the time to be planning for 

Fraternity Groups 



—Have them liken at—— 

McCI*ELLAN'S STUDIO 

44 Stau StfMt, • • Nwth.mi.lon. Mm 



mas 



FRESHMAN HOCKEY 

Good Material Shows Up At First 
Practice. 

Candidates for freshman hockey 
tesm were called Monday for the first 
time. A good freshman team is ex- 
pected ns there is a lot of good mater- 
ial in the class, lluckmnn *1 7, who is 
the assistant manager in charge of the 
freshman team ia arranging a 
schedule, 

COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

The standing of the competitors 

for the Orfh'i/ittii in number of cred- 

ita earned to date is printed below, 

The competition is but half over, and 

therein yet time for those who have 

but few credits to improve their 

standing so as to l>e eligible at the 

March elections. One credit for 

original work Is equivalent, to about 

160 words, ami one credit for reprint 

| work is counted as about $50 words, 

1 Competitors will please note that all 

manuscripts must bear their name, 



NINETEEN THIRTEEN NOTES 

Marshall Headle, who has been ia 
the florist business for the past yeai 
in Springfled has leased another range 
of greenhouses on Hickory street in 
the "City of Homes" and also opened 
a retail store the "Flower Shop" on 
Northampton Btreet a few doors from 
Poli's theatre. 

"Mike Lyons is now teaching 
biology in Springfield high school. 

James Holden, chemist, of Phila- 
delphia, was home in Palmer over 
Thanksgiving and is coming for n 
week's stay in that town Christmas. 
Harold Curtis of Belchertown grad- 
uates from Newton Theological senn- 
it] ary in June. Curtis was at college 
over the past week end. 

Don't let the old year die without 
paying your 1913 athletic field tu\* 
Two years is sufficient to accmnulair 
$10 surplus and the 31000 fund aeedi 
that amount from every "Batter el 
the earth." 

Herbert W. Headle now landscape 
architect for the city of Springfield is 
the park department has recent lv 
designed and supervised the buildiim 
of gates for the main entrance Of 
Forest Park ami is now oh Forestry 
work at the Van Horn Reservoir 
Headle dum and Headle dee k< , 
bachelor apartments on Su miner A 
where where all 1918 is welcome 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 
BOTAirr, 

Professor Osmun is conducting in- 
vestigations with the white | 
blister rust, a serious pest wideh 
tributed in western Maasacbuwtti. 
This disease lives In two stages. hsH 
the lime on the pine and half the 
on leaves of the currant. Professor 
Osmun is trying to determine wl 'it- 
er or not the fungus can winter 
on the currant. 

William L. Doran M5, of \Mh 
Dartmouth, a graduate gtnden '* 
working on the Antirrhynum -' 
which affects cultivated snap-di 
Though he has not found nn> ' ' 
irnens of this disease in the < >' 
greenhouses, Mr. Doran feu 
common in Connecticut and " 

Lenox, Mass. 



CLASS OF NINETEEN-FIVE 

U. L. Adams, professor farm ruan- 
•iiient and assistant professor of 
oiiomy University of California, 
Badd Hall, U. of C. Berkeley, Cal. 

(J, H. Allen, sales agent, Rotary 
1 >ducts Co., 1015 South Los Auge- 
St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

II. L. Barnes, faimer, Interlaken, 
Stockbrldge; 

IC. A. Bartlett, 570 Maud St., 
Stamford, Conn , president and treas- 
urer, Frost & Bartlett Co., vice-pres- 
iltut Oasis Farm & Orchard Co., 
I; .swell, N. M., editor and publisher 
of Tree Talk. 

Ci E. Brett, Brooklawn farms, Mor- 
ris IMains, N. J., practical work in 
jMiii I try. 

K. C. Bruce, plumber, 10 Avon St., 
( liftondale. 

C. M. Carter, florist, Bane. 

II. 1). Crosby, farmer, Princeton. 

K. C. Cushman, 21 Btown St., 
Providence, R. L, assistant Ammarv 
ttrowi Memorial. 

•I. J. Gardner, associate in pomol- 
ogy, University of Illinois, Urbana, 
III., M. S. University of Illinois, 
.bme, 1914. 

Ralph P. Gay, tree surgeon, 310 
Baal Front St., Plainfield, N. J. 

W. B. Hatch, 135 Southworth St., 
Wet* Springfield. 

C, S. Holcomb, 101 Klin St., Wol- 
laston, teacher of voice at Curry 
School of Expression, Copley Square, 
Boston. 

T. F. Huut, 2429 Chauniug Way, 
Berkeley, Cal., assistant superinted- 
tut agricultural extension, University 
• >f California, Berkeley Cal. 

K. F. Hutchings, engineering de- 
partment, General Electric Co., Lynn. 

It. K, Huntington, advertising man- 
ager Aldeu Speare's Sons Co., as- 
listant treasurer Atlantic Atsf, sec* 
retary Pilgrim Publicity Association, 
li" sixth St., Cambridge. 

N I). Ingram, Atascadero, Cal., 
general superintendent Atascadero 
lies, horticultural and agricultural 
engineer, 28,000 acres. 

J R. Kelton, teacher, 84 Pearl St., 
Amsterdam, N. Y. 

1 W. Lewis, 48 Lynde St., Mel- 
. farm superintendent, Long Is- 
land Hospital, Boston. 

■I -P. Lyman, associate professor of 
*fi - ultural chemistry. Ohio State 

I Diversity, Columbus, Ohio. 

W A. Munsou, county agent. Nor- 

County Farm Bureau, Dedharo. 

W. Newhall, Jr., farming with 

II U. Newhall & Co., 260 California 
s ' s aM Francisco, Cal. 

v J. O'Neill, 28 Eastern Ate., 

,! - rly, Industrial School for Deaf 

" Dumb, instructor for manual 

W tig, Beverly. 

\V, Patch, 104 Kingston St., 

Bw m, purchasing agent, Brown Dur- 

ompauy. 

A R, Paul, fruitgrower, president 

|( an Valley Co-operative Asso- 

ii chairman Warren County 

mimittee, Belvidere, N. J. 

■' • Richardson, track gardening 



and general farming. Mammoth Rd., 
Pawtucketville. 

W. M. Sears, sales manager o 
Frost & Bartlett Co., 570 Main St., 
Stamford, Conn. Home address, 
Elm PI., Glenbrook, Conn. 

A. N. Swain, horticulturist and 
distnct manager of Munson-YVhitnker 
Co., 644 Tremont building. 

M. S. Tuft, general farming and 
fruit growing on 175 acre farm. Box 
94, Sterling. 

A. D. Taylor, landscape architect, 
1900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. Ohio. 
Paddock building, Boston. Home 
address, 73011 Hough Ave., ( leve- 
laud, Ohio. Non-resident professor 
landscape architecture, Ohio State 
University, Columbus, Ohio. 1915- 
1910. 

H. F. Thompson, It) Temple St., 
Arlington, head of department and 
professor of market gardening, M. 
A. C, Amherst. In charge of the 
extension woi k in the Boston district. 

B. Tupper. Plymouth County 
Farm Bureau, Brockton. 

L. S. Walker, assistant chemist. 
Mass. Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, Amherst, 111 Phillips St., Am- 
herst. 

C L. Whitaker. 170 Fourth Ave., 
New York, N. V., president Mun- 
son-Whitaker Co., forest engineer. 
Home address 443 Homestead Ave.. 
Mount Vernon, N. V. 

G. N. Willis, 107 West Housalonic! 
St., Pittsfield. District engineer 
with Mass Highway Commission in 
charge of Southern Berkshire Dis- 
trict, 106 Agricultural Bunk building, I 
Pittsfield. 

F. L. Yeaw, Roswell, New Mex- 
ico. Manager Oasis Ranch, general 
manager of Oasis farm ami Orchard 
Co. Inc., and membet of Board of 
Directors, editor of book entitled 
"Market Gardening" published by 
John Wilev Sous. 




LISTEN ! 

Jiuv that Christinas gift for VUUr 
"wik-," brother, father or friend, 
here and now. Wc have ilu* finest 
and most complete assortment pos- 
sible of everything that a man needs in wearing apparel. Not 
gimcracks, but useful articles that a man will use and appreciate. 

A FEW SUGGESTIONS : 

MACKINAW'S, $5.00 to $10.00. The famous Patricks, 
MANHATTAN SHIRTS, $1.50 to $2.25. Soft ami itifl cults 
REVERSIBLE COLLARED SHIRTS, $1.00 to $3.50. some fine 

offerings in silks. 



H. AND P. GLOVES, 50c to $5.00. 

or silk lined. 



Lined or untitled. lur lined 



Best at any price. $5.00 



0AKES PURE WORSTED SWEATERS, 
to $7.00. 

MUFFLERS IN EITHER SILK OR WOOL, 50c to $3.50. 
COLLAR BAGS, $1.00 to $2.00. 

ALTMAN CRAVATS, BATWINGS OR FOUR-IN-HANDS, 25c, 
50c, 65c and $1.00. 



LEATHER BAGS AND SUIT CASES, 
to $10.00 



\n 



SO 1 1 < I I o 



whi.le. $5.00 



FULL DRESS LINKS AND STUDS 
$1.50. 



Separately 



u in 



•Is. 



25c to 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



rz 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 
Students Earn $103,000. 

Columbia students working theit 
way through college earned $1 ".'>.- 
016,74 iu the last academic yeai. 
The figures on student employment 
are given in the annual report of 
Paul C. Holler, secretary of the stu- 
dent appointment** office, just pub- 
lished. 

The student earnings are 140,000 
less than last year's. This falling off 
is due, according to the secret ary, to 

the influence of the war in Europe, 
The students who obtained employ- 
ment through Mr. Holler's oOicc. 
where the sen ice is given from bj 
the university, earned 827,25.1.11. 
Those who hustled aiouud for their 
own jobs made $68,764.11, 

The range of different job* is great. 
Some students earned expenses by 

acting as dancing teachers and others 
as dancing escorts. One young man 
off e red blood for transfusion at #4 an 

ounce. Soon after llii*. the price of 
blood jumped up to %1\ an ounce* 
One student earned $800 as a camp 
leader during the summer. Not a 
few students tended furnaces and 
waited on table for a livelihood while 
at Golnmbis, — Trmimripi. 



E. Frank Coe Fertilize rs 

1QC7 THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD 1Q1E 
lOOf FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS IS7ID 

Your Opportunity 

The editor of one of our leading agricul- 
tural papers writes us under date of January 
12th, 1915. as follows :- 

"I am doing all 1 can to induce farmers to 
plant grain crops this year. 

"Grain is very high and it is going higher. 
Wheat is going to $2,00 per bushel and other 
yr.i ins will share in the advance. Wheat cents 
$2,50 per 100 pounds now, and pound for 
pound oats cost as much. 

"It reems to me that the eastern farmer's 
salvation is to buy plant food and grow 
CORN, WHEAT, BARLEY, 
OATS AND BUCKWHEAT 

"Last fall I doubled my acreage of winter 
wheat and this spring I shall triple the acreage 
of oats. 1 managed to produce 40 bushels 
of wheal to the acre, and sold the straw at 
$ I 7.00 per ton in the bam." 

THE OProRTUNTTY IS YOURS! 

B« sure that jou boy 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

They are available plant foods that more than meet the 
exacting requ i reme - n ts, giving plump, sound, fuH heads of gram and vigor- 
ous, healthy straw. 

Eastern users erf F„ Frank Ox FeitiHiers are raising 40 bushels 
erf wheat to the acre. The average for the Unrted States for three years 
is 1 4 1'.-> bushels to the acre. 

THE QPPOOTllWTY IS VOURS ! WILL YOU MAKE THE MOST OP IT t 



\ 



X 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, §1 Chambers S 



t, N. Y. J 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 191$. 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 

EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

NatMoeated over post oMct I poms flight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

I. iix>r.il 1 ickel system lel.Jo-M 

T. MIKXTKA. 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday f torn 7-12. « >n your w<iy to P.O. 

The Highland Hotel 

Curner ol Hillm.in and nWMS S»tr«rt«, tt I 

blocks 1 rom the L Hiun Depot, t» a Mtudarn ii"-> 
telry run on tin- kVaropean 1'Uii. It i» |U»t •• Jtep 
from Vlam street, aW*J limn the nunc uddW 
and yet in the center ot the bosifteta -li^ti tct. 

It* room* art- well lin m-.li»«i unl comfortable, 
having a telephone Sad li "t and L.ild running 
water in evei y room. Puces •! and up, rooms 
with Iwlti jingle) • 1.3(1 and up. 

Itsexcellant Cttislm HI ! *eli ventilated dining 
100111 makes a meal 1 pl-.13.1nt meinory— every- 
thing of the nigh«st quality, «m*U cooked and 

^.1 ,id ill tile best potttBtS m-tnliet. 

Stay.lt the Highland Hotel Olio- .ind \<«U Will 
anticipate staying there again. Music efery 
evening 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



The Massachusetts Aeriwiltural Mm F0UHTAIN m 



Oilers courses of instruction in twenty-seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study ol 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Moore's Swan 

Waterman's 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 
Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 
Pomology 
Agricultural Chemistry 



Thirty-six dozen pens to select frc 



OUR RULE 



tn 



'Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



MiiclilaiHl 11 1 



s |ir iiiK<i<'l<l. »i <-- 



STUDEHTFUBHIfUBE 

RUGS 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AMD 

CARPET ROOMS 

•K. D. MARSH ESTATE 

Cox Sons & Vining 

•jz Madison Ave . New York 

Caps 
Gowns 
Hoods 

(in .ill Degree* 

ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLER6Y AND CHOIR 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

*7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 

Northampton. Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Cktieti (mlv frnm I A, *f '" 4 A U 



Economic Entomology 

\1 icrobiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIEUD, President 

AMHERST, MASS. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



• 



Associate Alumui, 

Joint Committee on lutercollegiate Athletics. 

SI. A. C Athletic Field Association. 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Bmchsll Association. 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tenuis Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Deleters, 

Musical Association. 

Nineteen Huntlred Sixteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index. 

M, A. C. Christian Association. 

H, A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference. 

Stockbridge Club, 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

C. A. Peters, Secretary 

H. ML. Gore, Secretary 

C. s. Hicks, Treasurer 

s. w. Hall, President 

EL L. Hidden, Manager 

A. W. SpaiiUling, Mauager 

I). A. Hicker, Mauager 

C. A. Huntington, Jr., Mauager 

N. Moovhouse, Mauager 

H. Aiken, President 

.1. T. Nicholson. Manager 

F. A. Anderson, Manager 

L. K. Fielding, Manager 

F. W, Mayo, Manager 

A. .1. Hicks. President 

E. L King, President 

C. H. Gould, President 

K. F. Tuber, President 



WKNKKDI IMHIK A(if>T>. 

lioth sexes, for best seller published. Plrtiodan 

and outfit free. 

bko \v s>«»Mi;n-, i-*i •*■ AsajrastJao. Ms 

COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Huston. 

MODERN REPAIR OEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEQE lor MOl 
YOKE at 15 min. past the hour. 




rhsmarsSSvet ••'! t ••-Mi, *>* r»"^»«M 
buy vout 



COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



CARS 



stationery, Newspaper 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 



RAHARS INN 

N,,rtlt.itin M.1--.C btMMI 



A. J. HAJ 

Newsdealer 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Ml., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

SO Miles of Trackage -modem 
Equipment -Trala Dispatch- 
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press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
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MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 14, 1915. 



No. 12 



MUSICAL CLUBS PUN FOR 

EXTENSIVE HOLIDAY TRIP 



Concerts to be Given in Boston, Marl- 
borough, Newburyport and 

Hingham. 

During the Christmas recess, the 
combined Glee and Mandolin Clubs 
will give a series of concerts in the 
vicinity of Boston. Under the di- 
rection of Professor Bigelow of Am- 
herst College, the cluhs have pro- 
giessed remarkably and promise a 
rare musical treat to all who hear 
them. The college orchestra will he 
taken along and will furnish music 
for dancing, which is to follow each 
concert. 

In addition to the list published in 
last week's issue of the Collegian, 
Manager Anderson announces an en- 
gagement for the Hubs in Marlboro 
1. 11 the evening of Dec. 27. Whether 
or uot the Copley- Plaza affair can 
be staged depends upon the sale of 
tickets. Professor Kobbins of the 
Non-Athletics Board will uot allow 
the concert unless a guarantee of 
^OO is furnished by Wednesday, 
Use. 16. I'p to noon Tuesday only 
■i little over SI 00 worth had been 
sold and the prospects are not any 
too bright for the holding of the big- 
gest social event of the season, unless 
the demand for tickets is a little 
more brisk than it has been. 



HOCKEY 

BOSTON ARENA 



rsisc so 

MASSACHUSETTS 

vs. 

DARTMOUTH 



dec. m 
MASSACHUSETTS 

VH. 

M. I. 



T. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL SPEAKER 
DISCUSSES AIMS IN LIFE 

Professor Rauachenbusch Tells His 
Hearers To Concentrate Attention 
Upon The Great Usuea Which 
Confront 'J hem. 

"Concentrate your attention upon 

tbe great aims of life," said Prof. 

Walter Hauschenbusch of the Rovbes- 

Theological Seminary in Sunday 

ipel. "Tbe detailsof life will coii- 
f..iin to the effort made toward the 

tinment of these aims " Contin- 
uing, Professor Hauschenbusch spoke 

the four great aims of life. 

First of all, we have a life to live. 

title we have life we have a couliu- 
1 us struggle for existence, often 

linst great odds. But while we 

1 ive youth we have courage and 

iiusiasm to face tbe world, and go 

. always expecting to see a beauii- 

view at each turn of the stream of 

1 '%, We took forward eagerly to ex- 

ience, but when we are old, life 

■ nothing for us bat the memory of 

1 past. Youth lasts only as we live 



DARTMOUTH TO BE FIRST 
OPPONENT OF AGGIE TEAM 

Hockey Men Have Practice on Col- 
lege Rink Before Season Oprns at 
Boston Arena, December 29, 

Weather that lias had the tang of 
wiotri in it has been ideal for the 
hockey candidates who have l»een 
working out on the college pond for 
the past week. Km the first time in 
a number of years the team will have 
an opportunity for practice on the ice 
before the first game of the seuson 
which this year comes with Dart- 
mouth at the Arena ou the 2*Jih. of 
the month. The team will practice 
on the local surface until vacation 
time when they will work out on the 
Arena. 

It cannot be said at the present 
time just what the prospects for a 
winning team are except that it is 
expected that the team will measure 
up to the standard of last year's 
seven. There is no gainsaying the 
fact that Ross will be missed on the 
defense, but thete are prospects of 
bis being eligible during the second 
semester which will help out a lot on 
the latter part of the season. The 
team is fortunate in having a goal 
tender of the calibre of Buttrick of 
whom great things are expected. He 
was on the football squad all fall and 
is quicker on his feet than he was at 
this time last year. 

The other men are fully up to last 
years standard and Chisholm and 
Fernald seem faster than' ever before 
while Woolley is showing the same 
tendency to get into things that has 
made him a mainstay on three Aggie 
sevens, Sanderson and Wildon of 



PHI KAPPA PHI HONORS 

SEVEN OF SENIOR CLASS 

Announcement of Elections to Hon- 
orary Fraternity Long Delayed. Prof. 
Gage Also Blected to Membership. 

Seven members of the class of 1916 
have been elected to meml>ership in 
tbe honorary scholarship fraternity 
Phi Kappa Phi, and one member of 
the faculty. Dr. George E. Gage. 
The new memliers areas follows: 
Miss Mae F. 1 1 olden, of Royalston ; 
Alfred A. Gioioaa, of Dorchester; 
Harold A. Mostrom, of North Mid- 
dlelioro; KverettS. Richards, of Hat- 
field ; Tyler S. Rogers, of Saxonville ; 
Frank J. Scheufele, of South Natick; 
and Ralph F. Taber, of Cooj>erstown, 
N. Y. The elections were made on 
Oct. It, but owing to the illness of 
President Hyde of Bowdoin, who was 
to have given an address, the cele- 
bration of Phi Kappa Phi Day has 
had to be indefinitely |>ost|H>iied. 



SEVEN HOME GAMES ON 

1916 BASEBALL SCHEDULE 



[Con tinned on 



2; 



[rontlnnerl on oaf* Si 



COUNT f AGF.NTS GATHER 

FOR ANNUAL CONFERENCE 

Many Aggie Alumni In Attendance 
At Meeting Of Agriculturista. 
The' third Annual Conference of 
County Agents and Vocational Agri- 
cultural Instructors opened its ses- 
sions at Massachusetts Agricultural 
college Monday, Dec. 13, and will 
continue for the rest of the week, 
Represeutatives have come from all 
the counties in the state Where organ- 
ized county agent work is being done, 
and there are also present teachers of 
agriculture in the various secondary 
! schools throughout the state, many of 
them being alumni of the college. 

The instruction this year is ar- 
ranged in the form of two hour sem- 
inar periods, and demonstrations are 
being given along the lines that are of 
most help to the men who attend tbe 
conference. Committees have been 
appointed to which will be referred 
questions which arise during the dif- 
ferent sessions. These committees 
i will report and make reuommenda- 
' tions at the end of the conference. 
The meeting of the county agents is 
; being held under the direction of 
I Prof. William D. Hurd, Supervisor 
of Extension work at tbe college, 
; together with Sumner R, Parker, 
I Assistant State Leader elect. All the 
conferences and seminars are held In 
Room 114, Stockbridge Hall. 

*03, — Lyman A. Cook has removed 

to *'• i " ton. 



Williams and Middlebury Again to 
Appear. Dartmouth to Start Sea- 
son with Game on Alumni Field. 

The Massac in i sen* baseball sched- 
ule for 15)16 has heeu announced by 
Mauager Alinon W. Spaulding and 
consists of 16 games, seven of which 
will be played in Amherst and four 
of them on Saturdays. Williams 
and Middlebury will make their 
initial appearance on the Aggie 
schedule in a number of years. Two 
games will be played with Dart- 
mouth, Springfield, Tufts, Middle- 
bury ami Amherst. Dartmouth and 
Tufts will play on the campus for the 
first time. The first game is one of 
the biggest of the season, for Dart- 
mouth will appear in the dedication 
of the new diamond on Alumni field. 
As uo scores have been made to date 
against a varsity or freshmen team 
on the new field. Captain King's 
t.. |i|| has r '.!!>ii"i'' '•'••".•'ii to (tpit* , !<l 
The team will make a Vermont trip 
and play Middlebury and Vermont 
University the last of May. As 
usual. Tufts will !>«• played at Bed- 
ford on Memorial Day. This year 
there is a possibility of playing tbe 
final game with Amherst on Alumni 
Field, provided the grand stand ia 
completed in time. As Amherst and 
Massachusetts have their Commence 
ments during the same week, this 
game will be the feature event of tin- 
season. 

The schedule is as follows ; 
April VI, Dartmouth at \mherst, 

19, Hpriiijfliehl at Sprintfllelil. 

'£■1, Williams a! VV'llliamstown. 

2<S. Dartmouth at Hanover, 
May SI, Springliehl a! amhsral 

fl, Aflsbeis! at AmhertU, 

IS, Tnfis at A inherst. 

II*. 1 1 o I > Cross at WoreHKiBr. 

-it), Worcester Tech »i Amherst. 

_<:(. Miilillelniry at Mirl»llel>ni\ 
24, Vermont at BnrHti$|ioii. 
27. Boston College a! \umu,n 
an. Tufts ai tfsdford 

June 8, Middlebury ai Amherst, 
in. Trinity at llartlunl 
17. Amherst at Amherst. (Com- 
maneemeiit game.j 



WESTMAN CHEERLEADER 

Robert C. Westman T7 of Roaliu- 
dale was elected assistant cheer leader 
at a mass meeting held after Assem- 
bly Wednesday. This is the first 
time that a cheerleader has been 
elected by the student body, the mat- 
ter formerly being in the hands of the 
Senate. 



O 

O 

% 



i - 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 1915. 



INFORMAL 

The third and by far most sueces- 
f'ul informal of the year was held 
Saturday afternoon and evening in 
the Drill Hall. About ninety couples 
were present. Although this is much 
the largest number that has attended 
this season, the floor was not over- 
crowded. The hall was cleverly dec- 
orated with maroon streamers, ban- 
neri ami flags. The orchestra, hid- 
den behind several palms, was ar- 
ranged to the side of the floor, thus 
giving more diim-ing Hpace. Music 
was furnished bv Porter's orchestra. 
Supper was served at Draper Hall 
during intermission. Dancing was 
from li-'M) to 15 and 7 to 8 80, The 
M. A. ('. chaperoneH were Mrs. Fleet 
and Mis. O.smun ; those from Smith, 
Mrs. Hillings and Mrs. (iunett ; from 
Mt. Holyoke, Mrs Schaefner. The 
following attended : 

1918 — Richards, Stheufele, Ryan, 
King, Anderson, Sclkregg, Aiken, 
Brazil, Fernald, Curdarelli, Sander. 
Darling, Huntington. Stearns. Dan- 
fort b. Harris and Terry. 

1917 — Saville, Steams, Irving, 
Ross, Chamberlain. Fisher, Hill, 
(Jurshin, Henderson, I'pson, (jiiiinby, 

Bookman, Saidet, Dickey, Mavo. 

Thayer, Holden, Kelsey. Rogers and 

Hageletefn. 

1918— W. Sawyer, Powell, Rich- 

ardson. Spauldiiig, Phillips, Faber, 
Boas, Bock, Thompson, Wright, 
Bochenaa, Jackson, A. Allen, Itutter, 
Clapp, Marshall, Babbitt, Schwartz, 
Weeks. Messenger. Fierce, van 
Alstyne, Seavev and McKee. 

1!M'J — Howland. Schcnkelberger, 
Stuart, BOWS, McCarty, C. White, 

Woods, Cosby, Willis, Carley t Coe, 
King and tfattoon. 

Others— Zabriskie '13, Reed "14, 
Dr. Anderson, .Johnson, Feters and 
Severance '15. 



FENCING CLUB 

Thayer '17 is interested in the 
formation of a fencing club at M. A. 
('., and will be glad to Meet all who 
C to take lessons Thursday after- 
noon at ft o'clock in the Social Union 
Room. Professor Audros of the 
Springfield Y. M.C. A. College, who 
has had ex|>erieoce in coaching fenc- 
ing teams at Cornell nml elsewhere, is 
anxious to lake up again the work in 
fencing started by the men of MA. 
C. last year. If enough men signify 
intentions of taking up the sport, his 
services can again be secured at very 
reasonable rales and credit will be 
given by the physical education de- 
partment for work done ander his 
direction. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

[Continued f nun juttfe 1] 

a clean life ; fast living produces all 
the effects of a premature old age. 
The true believer in Realism should 
paint a picture not only of the joys of 
the moment but of the physical 
wrecks produced by indulgence in 
••real" life. 

We have a love to love. A man's 
full personality is developed only 
by association with others, and the 
most stimulating of all is the love of 
a woman. When a man comes to the 
time of choosing a mate, then he 
should have the most sense, but by an 
unhappy misfortune, he is likely to 
have least at that time. We should 
look upon a wife as a partner to stand 
with us through life. Then the child 
brings a new love into our lives and 
makes us live our youth over again. 

We have a work to do. The stim- 
ulation of necessity is a great thing 
foi us. We should make what we do 
a business of self-expression and con- 
tribute our part to the general good 
of ma ikiud, giving always more than 
we take, thus making for the progress 
of society. God has given us a great 
fund of energy and no man has the 
right to be a parasite. 

Lastly, we have a (Jod to find. 
We have all learned as children that 
there is a great power behind the 
universe, vet in our formative period 
in life we are all waiting for a uew 
conception of the meaning of God. 
Only by living our lives can we get 
the true understanding of God, built 
up bit by bit from the faith we began 
with. If a man will start believing iu 
the fund of knowledge that he has 
the test will develop by living a right 
life. 



DRAMATICS NOTES 

"Under Cover" has been secured 
by special concession for the Roister 
Doister Prom production. Tryouts 
will be held Thursday evening at 6-B0 
in the Social Union room. Parts will 
be assigned on Friday morning. 



BROOK'S FARM BURNED 

At about three o'clock last Satin - 
day afternoon "Brooji's Farm," 
known to every Aggie man for the 
last decade, was seen to be afire and 
before the town department could 
arrive on the scene the famous land- 
mark was a sheet of flames and 
another structure of tradition, vying 
in popularity with the old "dog cart," 
was fast disappearing. 

An attempt was made, under di- 
rections of Mr. Dickinson of the 
Horticulture department, to get a line 
of hose to the fire but the distance 
was ton great for the college hose 
and not until the Amherst hose car* 
riage arrived was a length secured, 
and then the inability to get any wa- 
ter pressure made it useless. Noth- 
ing could be done but watch the 
flames until there was nothing left 
but tht two chimneys, aroand one of 
which the fire itarted. 

The house itself was a part of the 
old Cowls estate which formerly took 
in a large section of land both sides 
the road and running hack to the 
river. From time to time the college 
bat acquired parts of it and private 
parties have bought up the rest and 
most of the land where the ex peri ■ 



raent station plots on the east side of 
the road are was once a part of the 
estate. About eight years ago the 
farm-house and surrounding build- 
ings came into the hands of Dr. 
Brooks, Director of the Kxperimcnt 
Station, and the other buildings were 
moved off, leaving the farm-house 
there alone as a lodging house for 
Aggie students. And since that 
time some of the best men the college 
has ever seen have spent a year or 
two there or just a night or two to get 
a taste of Brooks Farm roughhouse for 
which the place was noted. Last 
spring the house was closed but was 
opened again this fall and leased to 
Mrs. Minnie Maclagen who was liv- 
ing there at the time of the fire. The 
house was partly covered by insur- 
ance and the furniture, most of which 
was saved, was also insured. 



DR. SEERLEY GIVES LAST 

LECTURE OF SERIES 
Oood Attendance at Final Talk Be- 
fore College Y. M. C. A. 

Dr. F. N. Seerley of the Spring- 
field Y. M. C. A. college gave the 
last of his series of talks on "Sex 
Hygiene" before the Christian associ- 
ation Thursday night in the Audito- 
rium. The lecture was very well 
attended by an appreciative audience. 
A collection taken up aftei the meet- 
ing resulted in contributions amount- 
ing to $11, to be used toward defray- 
ing the expenses of the series. As 
this amount covers ouly a small part 
of the expense incurred by getting 
Dr. Seerley to speak at the college, 
the otliceis of the Y. M. C. A. ask 
that those who so generously pledged 
their support at the opening of col- 
lege would now commence to make 
good the amounts set down after 
their names. 



LIVELY COMPETITION FOR 

HOLIDAY SPECIAL TRAINS 
Students Offered Choice of Routes to 
Boston and Return. 

"Competition" not "Combination" 
seems to be the watchwoid just at 
present, at least in so far as special 
trains are concerned, for the students 
ate now offered a choice of routes to 
Boston at prices low r than they ever 
dreamed possible. The persons re- 
sponsible for this unique state of 
affairs are Harold Aiken *16, repre- 
senting the Boston & Maine railroad 
and John W. Murphy *1G, who plans 
to run a special train via the Central 
Vermont-Boston a Albany route. 
Each man declares he offers the 
shortest, quickest, cheapest and most 
comfortable means of travel be- 
tween the State college and the 
city of Boston, but the relative pat- 
rouage of each will depend largely 
upou the schedule of tariffs, whicli 
has not yet been made public. 

Murphy's train will leave theC. V. 
station Friday, Dec. 17 at 5-25 v. m. 
arriving in South Station at 8-00 
o'clock. Returning on .Ian. 3, 1916, 
it will leave South Station at 8-45 a. 
m., reaching Amherst at 11-45. 
Stops will be made at Worcester, 
South Framingham, Newtonville. 
Huntington Avenue and Boston. 

Aiken's train will leave the B. ft 
M. station Friday, Dec. 17 at 5-8n 
c. m. and will arrive in North Station 
■I *-<)<) o'clock. On the return trip, 
the train will leave North Station at 
9-05 arriving in Amherst at II 35 on 
Monday, Jan. S. The train will 

stop at Oakd.de. Hudson, W altliaiu. 

West Somerville and Boston. Both 
nun promise vestibule trains with the 
best of service and guarantee them 
to arrive on schedule time, unless, of 
course, delayed 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 1915. 



E A. ELLSWORTH DEAD 

The funeral of Emory A. Ells- 
worth, for forty years one of the best- 
known architects and engineers in 
Holyoke, was held at 40 Essex Street, 
Holyoke, Saturday afternoon. He 
was born in Hard wick, the son of .1. 
F and Maria (Lawrence) Ellsworth. 
Mr. Ellsworth was educated in the 
schools of his native town and grad- 
uated from the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College in the class of 1871, 
the first class to leave the institution. 
While at college he was one of the 
founders of the Q.T.V, fraternity. 

After leaving college, Mr. Ells- 
worth went to work for K. E. Davis 
of Northampton, an engineer of note. 
Later he formed a partnership with 
W, E, Davis, a nephew of his former 
employer. In 1883 Mr. Ellsworth 
branched out into business for him- 
self in Holyoke, and some years later 
took in as his partner, John J. Kirk- 
pa trick, present manager of the 
Municipal Lighting Department of 
that city. When the latter retired, 
he established the prevent firm of 
Ellsworth A Howes. Mr. Ellswonh 
was Holyoke city engineer in 1884, 
1885, 1887, 1888 and 1890. 



CONCERT POSTPONED 

The concert which was to have 
been given last Friday night by the 
musical clubs in Holyoke under the 
auspices of the high school athletic 
association, was canceled. Accord- 
ing to the rules governing the Uffc 
school entertainments, only two 
dances can be held In one semester, 
ami, as the dance which was to have 
followed the concert would have 
made the third dance of the semester 
the trip had to be given up. It is 
probable, however, that the trip will 
be made some time in .January. 



TO DISCUSS JUNIOR PROM 

All who have any criticisms, favoi 
able or otherwise, regarding the hold 
ing of the 1017 Junior From at the 
NfMiotuck are asked to voice their sen- 
timents after Assembly Wednesday 
No definite arrangements have aa yet 
been made by the From committci 
and they desire to find out the senti- 
ment of the student body before go 
ing on further with their plans, Tb 
issue under discussion will be whether 
the Prom shall be held in the Dril 
ball or at the Nonotuck in Holy ok- 



TELLS WHY THE RURAL 

NEW YORKER SUCCEEDS 



In Address to Stockbridge Olub, Dr. 
Collingwood Sets Forth Princi- 
ples of Oood Journalism. 

"Find the words in which your 
people think, (let their confidence." 
With these words, Dr. Herbert W. 
Collingwood, editor-iu-ehief of the 
fin rat New Yorkrr, characterized 
the policy of his paper at a talk 
before the Stockbridge club Tues- 
day evening. A man must live 
the life of his readers to he a jour- 
nalist: The Rural New Yorker is a 
distinctive paper because those iu 
control do just that. 

In discussing the underlying prin- 
ciples of journalism. Dr. Collingwood 
•aid that the good journalist must 
keep accurate notes ou every subject 
and have that information ou file 
where he can get at it when he wants 
to use it. Above all things else, 
however, he must have an under- 
standing of the language that the 
people speak, and must write in that 
language, for only in so doing can 
lie make his readers think. The 
average farmer speaks a language of 
ihort Anglo-Saxon words for the 
most part and it is this fact the rural 
editor must bear in mind when writ- 
ing. An ignorant man may gain 
readers and hold them, while u deeply 
lead scientist may fail, simply be- 
cause the former is speaking the lan- 
guage of the people for whom he 
writes, 

Readers will soon subscribe to 
another paper if the editor hands out 
n"iliing but dry-as-dust scientific 
facts. The journalist iniiHt cultivate 
imagination by devoloping the read- 
ing habit, and not drive imagination 
out of his soul. He must find out 
what the farmers are thinking of and 
. • t to understand them as man to 
man. Dr Collingwood said that an 
agricultural paper should be edited 
m the cocntrv in order to get the at- 
mosphere iu which the farmer does 
his evervdav work. 

■f w 

Patience is also a necessary virtue 
of a newspaper man. Week after 
k the Hn ml New Yorkwr receives 
inquiries about subjects which have 
been many times explained in the 
■ olumns of the paper, yet each in- 
quiry is patiently answered by the 
editors. It takes patience, too, and 
•mage to combat the temptations 
'<red to papers in the shape of big 
I vertising contracts. The oorpora- 
ions do not want the advertising but 
*isn by that means to get favorable 
litorial comment. The Rural New 
Yorker is not to be bought, howerer, 
it wants the confidence of the 
rage farmers. 
To hare s successful paper, the 
litors must print the truth and the 
cts and not be ashamed to admit it 
hen in the wrong. It is far belter 
• say, "I don't know," than to pre- 
nd to know it all. Ideals are 
■eotial to the make-up of a good 



journalist. Every man should have a 
hobby and keep at it even though 
forced to do some other kind of work 
which is not particularly agreeable. 
In closing, Dr. Collingwood told 
of au old Irish gardener whom every- 
one liked to have work for him. 
When asked why he was popular he 
replied, "I guess it is because I put 
joy into my job." That simple sen- 
tence souuds the keynote of success 
in journalism. 



TRUSTEE APPOINTED 

(Governor David I. Walsh has 
nominated Foster W. Stearns of 
BoBton to succeed Arthur G. Pollard 
of Lowell on the Board of Trustees 
of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. The nomination was re* 
feried. according to rules, to the 
next meeting of the Governor's 
Council for confirmation, and there 
should be no further delay iu his ap- 
pointment. He is the grandson of 
the late President W. S. Clark and 
the son of Frank W. Stearns of the 
R. II. Stearns Company of Boston. 

Mr. Stearns was born in Hull and 
wtis a graduate from Amherst Col- 
lege in 1903. He was a member of 
the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity and 
in his senior year won the Kent prize 
for the best essay in English liter- 
ature. After graduation he studiid 
at Harvard, receiving the degree of 
A. M. in 1906. For one year he 
taught English in Phillips Academy 
at Andover. He was graduated in 
1909 from the General Theological 
Seminary in New York, and has 
spent much time in study abroad. 
From 1909 to 1911 he was rector of 
the Episcopal Church in Sheffield. 
He married Miss Martha Genung, 
daughter of Prof. .John F. Genung 
of Amherst College. He is now 
librarian of the Museum of Fine Arts 
in Boston. 



HOCKEY 

fl "HI in. If rl fl 



II 

last year's scrubs are showing up 
well and seem more able than ever. 
There are a number of other men 
who are fast and aggressive and who 
will give these men a rub for their 
positions, which are by no means 
settled. 

The Freshmen are being coached 
by Donald Hill, the old Arlington 
star and now a special student here. 
He is developing a team that will fur- 
nish the varsity with mom excellent 
practice, for there are a host of good 
players in the Freshman class, in- 
cluding men who hare played on 
the best school teams around greater 
Boston, The Freshmen have a 
schedule alio and will doubtless put 
a strong team on the ioe and one for- 
midable enough to cope with the 
Dartmonth freshman, whom they 
play here Feb. II, 



NINETEEN THIRTEEN NOTES 

Lester Pease has "gone in" for 
apples and poultry ou his farm at 
Templetou, Lester writes that the 
"Class boy," Paul Jensen, is some 
boy. The winner of the class ran 
true to form, his birthday was Sept. 
7, 1914, Labor Day. 

"Willie" Covill aud "Herb" Brew- 
er have given the 1913 Athletic Field 
fund a good boost this last week. 
Who is next? 

"Norm" Clark spent Sunday at 
college. He is still with the High- 
way Commission, with headquarters 
at Worcester. 

"War" Little, vocation, engineer, 
county office, Salem ; avocation, bas- 
ketball and getting weekly trim- 
mings along with the other members 
of the Newbury port Y. M. C. A. 

Saturday "Bruin" Brown's old 
landmark, Brooks Farm, was burned 
to the ground. 

"Willie" Covill writes that he has 
been in Brooklyn since last summer, 
working on the construction of a new 
seven story reinforced concrete build- 
ing which the mercantile firm he is 
with has been putting up. .Ioe sends 
bis new address, 1115 Bedford Ave., 
Brooklvn, N.Y. 



An Especially Oood Communion Proposition— 

Cash for test ordet* - Article wiilrlv Atfveilixid 
Cats ilcwn ex reuse in powei Hauls— AridreAs 
Fni.inhkkini; St'priv Co., 2238 N. yth Mirrt, 
Philadelphia, Pa, 

The Holyoke Valve £ Hydrant Co. 

Jubhersof Wrought Iron and Hr»s* Pipe, Valvet 
♦nd Fittings for Steam, Water and Gi«, Asbestos 
and Magnesia Hoiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Kupnlle* Engireeis and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and P.ngire 
Connections. Holyoke, Mas*. 

ItlX IvM.W'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



»• HA1MI»»» 



" BIDE-A-WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty— And oilier good things to eat. 

MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 
Middle Street, Hadley, Mans. 

Tel 415 -W 

DR. R. C. BANGS 

Dentist 

NASH** BLOCK 
Eveninga by Appoint mi nt 

hotel uiarrcn 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T. «l. AHERN, HANACCN 



D„„« ^ t C i are supplied every year 

Durpee s ijeeds directtn,m,reAmeri - 

* can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914,~a bright new book of 1 82 pages, whicli 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 



Building., Philad* 



11a 



Page's Mior SStore 



CI Al NOTICE 



Bijj surprise for M. A. C. men at Ml store! 

Don't buy Footwear till you see us 

W IS 1*/\ I **I."VC4 — Double-wear Leather used, 



Scbool and College Photographer* . . . 




LOO ALLY: 5» Center St., Northampton, Mass.. 

and South Hadlcy, Mass. 

Main Ornes: 

1546-1548 Broadway. 

Ntw York City 



These .Studio* offer the beil ikill#d 
* artists and moil complete 

equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



"Joan", a malteae eat which has 
been a mascot of the dormitory men 
for the past at? en yean died recently. 



•DEALERS IK- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 14, i9'5 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 191 5. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOAKD OF EDITORS. 



TYLEB 8. ROGERS "IB. 
RICHARD W. SMITH 17 
FRANK J. BOHEUFELE 
THOS. L. HARR(M'K8'16, 
ALFRED A. 44IOIOSA '1« 
DWIGHT F. BARNES Hi. 
MlLFORI> R. LAWMEN*' 
ELLIOT HENDERSON 1 
WILLIAM SAVIU.E. .IK 
MARSHALL (>. LANFHK 



Editor-in-Chief 

Miinatfimt Editor 

•16, Assistant Editor 

Atbletic Editor 
i Athletic Editor 

Alumni Editor 
E *17. Sews Editor 
I, i k< i ■.»!■» in cut Editor 
. "17, Campus Editor 
Alt 'is. Asso'e Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

CHA8. A- HUNTINGTON, JR. *18, 

Business Manager 

MEHRILL P. WARNER 'II. 

Assistant Business Manager 

LESTER E. P1ELIHNO *M. 

Ailvfrtlsing Manager 
JAMES C. l"OWKLL 1«. < irtulatlon 



Subscription $1.60 per year. Single- 
copies, 6 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble tO C'UAKI.KS A, UlTNTISOTON, Jit. 

Entered as secondH-lass matter at the Amherst 
Poat Office. 



Vol. XXVI. Tuesday, Dec. 14. No. 12 



good society we will not command or 
indeed deserve that respect. While 
students at Aggie still appear to out- 
siders as ill mannered boors we will 
not be considered in the light of col- 
lege men no matter how fine our cur- 
riculum or our football team or our 
musical clubs. Conditions can be 
improved but not so long as certain 
men in the upper as well as the lower 
classes ridicule the efforts of those 
who are trying to win for Aggie some 
of the social recognition that they 
feel sbedeseives. The place of these 
scorners is not here, it is at some 
place where ideals far different from 
those of the cultured Connecticut 
Valley prevail. If we as a college 
want the recognition that we feel we 
deserve, we must suppress the element 
that looks upon slovenly attire as a 
badge of merit and dismisses (he at- 
tempts to cultivate the finer senti- 
ments as the efforts of scheming 
politicians to further their own selfish 
ends. 

T. L. H. 



ADDRESSES FLORISTS AND 

GARDENERS CLUB 

Professor Root of Illinois Gives Talk 
on "Color Combinations." 
On Wednesday evening Prof. 
Ralph R. Root of the University of 
Illinois delivered a most interesting 
lecture on "Color Combinations" 
before the Florists and Gardeners 
club in French hall. Professor Root, 
who for the month of December has 
exchanged professorships with Pro- 
fessor Wa ugh, took for an illustration 
of his subject the planting of a for- 
mal garden. Professor Root has 
charge of both the Senior and .lunior 
classes in landscape gardening, com- 
bining them in one section. The 
problem now being worked on by 
both classes is the designing of a 
country estate. 



JUST A FEW OF THE "TITLES" WHICH WE 

HAVE ON HAND TO SHOW YOU 

"WHEN YOU DROP IN" 



Vlvtai 



LippinooU'B " Farm Manuals," 7 vols. 

First Prim-iples of Agriculture, 

Principles of Soil Management, 

Lyon, Flppln. Bnckmui 



The Potato. 






Frawi 


Forage Crops, 






1'ipt 


Brooks' Agriculture, 1 vols 








Feeds and Feeding, 


Henry an 


d Morri»iH 


Vegetable Gardening, 






Walt 


Farm Management, 






Warre>! 


Elements of Agriculture. 






Vtarrei 


The Farm and Garden Rule 


liook. 


Kail. 


Manual of Fruit Insects, In 


nge 


rland 


aadfroabi 


Milk and Its Products, 






Winu 


And (itlieii,. 







JOHNSON BOOK CO. 

85 Pleasant Street. 
R. A. Mooney H. W. Bishop 



NOTICE 

Next issue of the Collegian Jan. 
4, 1016. 



UOi:ollNKi K» AND OTUKKS. 

Tiik day of the college rotighueck 
is over. He is vanishing with the 
peg top trousers, bull dog pipe, sweat 
shirt, and talkative waistcoats that 
ere wont to adorn the magazine 
■Off! boy. College men are realiz- 
<g that the young man in college is 
not so very different from the young 
man who is earning his living, that he 
is judged by the same standards, con- 
demned for the same faults and 
lauded for the same virtues as bis 
less fortunate neighbor. They are 
realizing that college men are if any- 
thing judged a little more harshly than 
those who are not in college for there 
will always be a certain class of well 
meaning but misinformed people 
who see in the college a hotbed of 
evil aud a stupid waste of time. And 
among college people, we who are of 
an Agricultural college havr a certain 
prejudice to live down that arises 
merely because of the word "agricul- 
tural." Our college is changing. 
From a place where men came merely 
to learn better farming methods, it 
has become an outlook to a new ami 
better rural community in our own 
and other states. From a purely 
technical school it has become in 
truth, a college. **o we have come to 
feel that we are entitled to the same 
advantages in the way of intercollegi- 
ate athletics, social advantages, and 
outside activities that the man who is 
working for an A. B. enjoys. We 
like to feel that we are entitled to the 
same respect as college men that is 
afforded to the man from Williams or 
Amherst or Dartmouth. And in 
truth, we are, when we deserve it. 
But while men parade our campus 
whose one ideal in life seems to be to 
show how dense an ignorance they 
have of the usages and the demand of 



The unusual privilege of being the 
first to produce the popular melo- 
drama "Under Cover," except by 
the original companies, has been 
granted to the Roister Doisters by a 
special concession. This play has 
not yet been put on the road and has 
just completed a two-year run in 
New York as well as long runs in 
Boston, Chicago and other large 
cities. It is very seldom that an 
amateur or college dramatic society 
can secure such a popular play until 
it has been fully exploited in profes- 
sional companies, and the Roister 
Doisters are to be congratulated on 
their success. 

The management plans to stage 
the play as the annual Pre* pro- 
duction, which means that there is 
but a verv short time for ti vouts and 
rehearsals. Since the Freshmen as 
well as the veterans will be eligible 
for the production there is every in- 
dication that the society will lie able 
to "put it across" as they did with 
the musical comedy of last year. 
To do this, however, the Roister 
Doisters will need the strong support 
from the students which they have 
had in the past aud which they de- 
serve in the future. 



0g LAVAL 

SEPARATORS 

Save in 
7 Ways 

nilAWTITY of cream that M other sepa- 
UUamii I rator will recover completely. 

nil II IfY of cream M evidenced 1» l>e 
yUAl.ll I i^val butter always scoring high- 
est in every important contest. 

I AHflR i" e\ery way. by turning easier, 
LADUn |„.| I1(C Dimpler. easier to clean and 
reimlring no adjustment 

TIUF u ? hours, by reason at greater ca- 
ll Bit pacitr and the same reasons that 

save labor. 

fiftCT since while a I ••• Laval may cost a 
UUOI | llt ie more than a poor separator to 
iM-gin with, it will last from ten to twenty 
years, while other separators wear out and 
require to be replaced In from one to live 
years. 

DDftEIT >n more and better creum. with 
rnUTII ie«a labor and eff.irt. 

CiTICClPTinli which can only come from 
OS 1 101 AU HUH hnow j„g y ,„, have the best 

separator, and are at all tlmea accom- 
plishing the best possible results, 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith. 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome, 

KKl.ll Alt SON DA V SERVICE AT 7 P M 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORUEk 

Suits Cleaned. Pleased and Dyed Ail kinds ol 

Repairing for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly dene. 

High-grade work by first class tailor. Work 

called for and delivered. Sell tickets lor pressing 

4 suits for |i.se 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, Prop 

Main Street, Amherst. Mass Nash Block 

On your way to the Post Office. 1 el. «3»- « 

E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 
Lenses ground while you wait 

COLLIGB JBWRLKY 

Violin. Banjo. Mandolin and Guitar String 

AMHERST, MASS. 
Next to Pott Office. 



Amherst 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

Itt Broadway New York 

29 E. Madison St.. Chicago 



GO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shuts. 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10 i$c 
a i-*c 
1 i-ic 

48c per dor. 

30c per dor 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing* 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Suit 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 
A well attended and interesting 
meeting of Le Cercle Franeaia was 
held last Wednesday evening in 
French Hall. The first part of the 
meeting was devoted to French con- 
versation led by Oliver Flint *17. 
The conversation consisted of replies 
to question* on a text read in the 
meeting. The club wishes to urge 
all men of the college interested in 
French, especially those intending to 
major in scientific subjects, to be 
present at the next meeting, Jan. If, 
1916. Batista '19, will take charge 
of the conversation at the meeting. 
Professor Harmoant will also have a 
few words to say. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN * DYER, Prop*. 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
— Pens— 



Stbphbh Lank Folosb 

MASI'FAITPMINII .1 KVV Kl.KR 

IftO BROADWAY, NEW YOW 

• I .1 it AND '"i.l.li.l 
PINS AND HINOB * 

i> amvrmi *»» mtowM m sn» u* 

S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at i.t Pleasant St. 

Oculists' Prascriptiorii Filled. Broken Lenses 

Ae<rtirst«lTR«pl*«d. Fi » W * uh R *P*«» n * 

Promptly and skilfully Done. 

n r ' Satisfaction Guaranteed 



R.T.FmosTvAfent; D.SMitiiiYAii.AMt Ai*m 
Try our ticket system -«■* 

Put full name and address on laundry 

FLOWERS UNO PLANTS 

drown by the Florkultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
Rowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses und*r 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON mi CAMPUS 

Telephone (09 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 

flood work speaks for Itself 

Nash Block, Amherst. M- * 



QUESTIONS OF CONDUCT 

DISCUSSED AT FORUM 



tions for bettering existing con- 
ditions, presented by T. L. Harrocks, 
H. W. Karnes and J. T. Nicholson. 



udents Bring- Forth Severe Criti- 
ismg of Existing Faults and Sug- 
gest Various Remedies. 

Wednesday's Assembly hour was 
given over to a Student Forum. 
The subject discussed was, ■•The 
Conduct of the Student-body About 
t he Campus," and the argument 
In ought some very able criticisms of 
existing faults, 

C. H. Gould. :t member of the 
.liiint Committee on the Student 
Forum, was the first speaker. He 
mid that we have athletic and non- 
uililetir iMjjaiii/.aiitiiis ostensibly to 
.i.ivi-rtise the college, bnt thut the 
i oiidix't of each man on the campus 
goetj a great way toward the making 
of the college's reputation. He 
divided the main subject into the 
following sub-topics : — conduct at 
the Dining Hall, at Chapel and 
AwHcmblv ; dress, especially in con- 
nection wiih luformals, and petty 
thievery. 

S. \V. Hall, president of the Sen- 
ate, called for discussion on the sub- 
ject "Conduct at the I lining Hall," 
and some timely remarks were 
offered bv H. G. Little, G. B. 
i'almer, Lewis Schlotterbeck aud 
I '. W. Moses. 

The second subject, "Conduct at 
< hapel and Assembly," was dis- 
cuased by R. F. Taber* C. H. Gould, 
•I 1). Kirchard and W. H. Boai. 

('. W. Moses and F. A. Anderson 
presented several suggestions in re- 
gard to the "Conduct at luformals.'* 
K. I; Selkregg made a stirring de- 
nunciation of "Petty Thievery." 
\ .1. Hicks also spoke or. this sub- 
ject. 

The discussion closed with sugges- 



INDEX SCRAMBLE 

Fight for Latest Junior Annual 
to Start Wednesday. 

AUTOGRAPHED COPIES 

To be Given to Winners in Unique 
Contest. 

With the firing of the opening gun 
by President Hall of the Senate Wed- 
nesday afternoon there will start the 
first and only " bales Scramble" ever 
held on the M. A. C. campus. At 
exactly 4-15 the scramble for the 
latest hidvx will begin over by the 
Drill Hall ami a honk worih "scram- 
bling" for is promised. According to 
the rules announced last week, each 
contestant must first purchase a ticket 
front some member of the board and 
hand in his name to the president of 
the Senate, or Business Manager 
Mayo, before BOOH of that day. 

Twenty books will be passed out, 
each autographed either by President 
Kuttertleld or the professor to whom 
the book is dedicated. The first 
three and the last one will be free. 
Immediately after the scramble the 
Index will go on sale at the Coi.lko- 
ia\ office at the regular pi ice of $2.*»0. 



JUNIOR BANQUET 

Mooiehouae, Whilcomh and I^a- 
thain, constituting the .Junior Ban- 
quet committee have been supervising 
the collection of the customarv dol- 
lar tax from the Freshman class for 
this annual event. By vote of the 
class the banquet will be held at the 
Hotel Nonotuck. Holyoke, on the 
evening of March IK. 



CAMPION 

Fine Tailoring 



COLLEGE OUTFITTER 



Eeady-To-Wear Clothes 

For Christmas Suggestions. Woolii-y 'i<>. Agent, i South College 
A line of samples always on hand. 







. A. SHERARD 

ME N'S STO RE 

Use Our New Cash Discount Card and Save Five Per Cent 

— ON — 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 

Come to us for 







ATTENTION ! STUDENTS ! 

Christmas Plants Make Ideal Christmas Gifts 

Take a Plant Home For the Folks 

The Department of Floriculture Offers a Complete Line of 
Christmas Plants, including: 



Poinsettias 
Ardisias 

Jerusalem Cherries 
Cyclamen 



Begonias 
Christmas Pi 
Primroses 
Fenu 



GET YOUE ORDER IN EARLY 

ft nts and Cut Flowers Carefully Packed and Shipped by Parcel 
Post or Express to Any Part of New England. 

PRICES REASONABLE 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trooser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see yon. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



FREE 



EE 



For a few days only here's your chance to get 

FREE 

With a 90c Humidor of Tuxedo Tobacco, a 
GENUINE FRENCH BRIAR 

PIPE 

SEE THEM IN THE WINDOW 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Recall Store On the Comer, 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 191 5. 



J. GINSBUKG 

11 i-a Amity Street 

Modern Sboe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

75c Special Half Sole, Rubber 75c 
iv i • * v i iv i :v« - 

Mack, Tan, White Work Guaranteed. 

i •ivk.-i;.-* 

KubberSokn , .... Ul.fto 

Kubber Soles, with Heels . 01. IS 

Soles Sewed, M* 

33 Shfiira for Slim 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours : Q to la A. M., 1-30 to 5 r. m . 



STEAM PITTING. Telephone 50— R 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty ol Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 
Winoows, Lead Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave., AMHF.KST, MASS. 



You'll Want a New Suit for Christmas 

Select it today. The new styles in Autumn and Winter patterns await 
your inspection. You will want a stylish, comfortable SUIT or OVER- 
COAT. Step in and examine our line. Style is the addition to the latest 
fashion, to your individual need. Custom clothes aie designed for YOU, 
not simply cut to fit the stocky sized man. ( >m < lents' Furnishings Line is of 

The Latest Goods in Shirts and Collars 

Kid Gloves, all styles New Dress Vests at very reasonable prices 



A I.I. KINDS OF KkP\IK WOKK NKA I I V AM) PK'»Mi'II.Y DONK 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Professor Quaife of the department 

I of animal husbandry gave a lecture 

before the Farmers' Association of 

Westhampton Wednesday. 

» • a 

After less thau a year's experience 
with no license, the city of Northamp- 
ton went back into the wet column 
last Tuesday by a considerable 
majority. 

• * » 

1'resident Buttertield has appointed 
the following joint committee on the 
Student Forum : Dr. R. L. Sprngue, 
Dr. C. (1. Crampton and Prof. K. L. 
Quaife of the faculty and C H. 
Gould, S. \V. Hall and C. W. Moses 
of the student body. 

• • • 

William A. Davis 14 instructor in 
agricultural in the Marl bora High 
school is attending the third annual 

Conference of Oounty Agents and 
Vocational Agricultural Instructors 
now being held at the college. 
Among others attending are Clud- 
stone EL (ale Mo. Albert H. .Icnks 
'1 1 and Daniel .1 Lewis '!.*». 



1YKINC 



AI.TF.RINC 



CLEANING 



PKKSSINO 



LABROVITZ, 



Custom Tailor 



.. AMITY ST 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 

the miwt rconninu *l von ran ass 

BetteR crops 

are the inevitable result. 

THE ROGERS * HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown. Conn. 

orrli •• «n.| H'i'U, I'.n ilniiil Conn. 




Huntington Ave., Exeter sad Blagden Sts., Boston, Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

AMOS M. WHIPPLE. ...... 



£&rptrvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 

No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, M»^. 



INDEX ELECTION 

At a meeting held after Wedn 
day's assembly, the class of 1 S 
elected Howard L. Russell, of Wor- 
cester, Kditor-iu-Chief and Kemvth 
L. Messenger, of Winsted, Conn., 
Business Manager of the ID 18 Ind.x, 
The members of the board will be 
selected by competition. At the 
same meeting, Howard B. Capen, of 
Canton, was elected class hotkey 
manager. 



FRATERNITY NOTES 

Phi Sigma Kappa entertained the 
members of the faculty at an informal 
reception at the chapter house oil 
Friday evening, Dec. 10. 

About 20 members of the Kappa 
Sigma fraternity went to Springfield 
Saturday afternoon to attend t he 
banquet of the Conuecticut Valley 
Alumni chapter at the High I am I 
House. 



CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 
\\\ organizing classes in the differ- 
ent parts of the state, F.dwin H. For- 
bnsh, supervisor of correspondence 
courses at M A. ('.. is adding much 
to the efficiency of this well-tried in- 
stitution. A class in poultry hus- 
bandry has been formed at Towuseod 
Hurbor, one in soil fertility at Beverly 
and <>ne iu in .rket gardening at 
Asonet. < Mlu is have heen formed at 
Pittafield and elsewhere. The mem- 
bers of these classes meet weekly 
under then leadei and discuss Hie les- 
ion aaaigucd before filling out the 
papers i" be seal back to the collage, 
wh.re they are corrected and graded 
by the professors in charge. These 
courses have so grown in popularity 
iii the leal few \ears that it has now 
become necessary to increase the 
number of instructors. 



JUDGE LINDSEY SAILS 

WITH FORD PEACE SHIP 

Judge Ben. B. Lindsey of Denver, 
who was scheduled to speak at a 
social union entertainment on Jan. *. 
has sailed with Mrs. Lindsey us the 
guest of Henry Ford on the pen., 
ship Oscar II. Whether the party 
will return in time for Judge Lindsey 
to fulfill his speaking engagement .it 
M. A . C. is uncertain. 



No* is the time to be planning for 

Frater n ity G rou ps 

— — Have them is ken at — ~ 

MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 

44 State Street, • Northampton, Mass 



LAST LECTURE ON BIBLE 
Prof. Flint) (Jrsntof Smith College 
will give the last lecture of his series 
on Bible history before the Y. H. 
C. A. in the chapel Thursday even- 
ing at 0-30. All interested sre cor- 
dially Invited. The meetings held 
so far have been very interesting and 
have shown Profeaeor Grant to be an 
able speaker with a message well 
worth listening to. 

MANY CANDIDATES FOR 

VARSITY RIFLE TEAM 

Squad Soon to be Cut Down to Twenty 
Men 

Competition has started Iwtween 
members of the varsity rifle squad to 
determine what men shall make the 
team. Two teams will be picked to 
compete and the scores will be 
considered in picking the varsity. 
There are now 3fi men out, but it is 
expected that this number will be 
cut down to about fO by Thursday. 



NINETEEN FIFTEEN NOTES 

"Jim" Harper is doing graduate 
work in dairy husbandry at Aim v 
Iowa. He has full chaige of an 
experimental herd of cows, and Ike 
work is to determine ••The Influence 
of Alimentary Fat and Carbohy- 
drates on the Yield ami Composition 
of Milk." 

"Slim" Severance has just come i" 
Springfield to work with Smith and 
Wesson, at which place "Merl" Lane 
la a l-o working. 

Owen Slein is a tree surgeon ami 
la working in Pi: is tie Id. 

Arthur .Johnson is working fa 
Bridgeport for the present. 

Oeorge Hall, bacteriologist, b 
located in New York city, Ledert* 
Laboratories, 

"Blondv" Marsh is working of 
vacuum cleaners on the long. suffering 
people of Greenfield, as a winter Job. 

"Blondy,** "Bill" Doran and M 
Towne requested that engagemtnH 
be kept secret for the present » w 
notice will be published till Int. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

University of Oregon 

If the plan of the Oregon L'l 
it? faculty Is carried out, the 
lie no more athletic conic* 
outside colleges, and inter* la- 
ities will be substituted. 1 
dent body strongly opposes 1 
ruling and has drawn up rem 
condemning it. 



Hill 

■th 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 1915. 






1 



,1: 

rii 



ALUMNI NOTES 

1 A I. CLUBS CONCERT AND DAM K 
AT BOSTON. 

he Aggie Musical clubs hold their 

annual concert and dance at the 

ley Plaza Hotel, Boston, on Tues- 

Dec. S3 at H-00 o'clock. Occur- 
; as it does during the Christmas 
rs ition period at college, there will 
Ik it least 100 couples present from 
tin undergraduate body and the 
alumni are expected to furuish an 
equal if not a greater number. 
since this is the first affair of its 
kind the college has attempted here 
in Huston and especially since it is to 
he held in the famous ball room of 
Boston's best hotel, your support is 
seeded to insure success. Invite 
your friends also — the concert and 
other features will be in every way 

w *? 

worth while. Those who do not care 
to take part in the dancing may pur- 
chase tickets for the concert only. 

The financial end of the affair is 
heing bandied by the college Musical 
iliihs, with the support of the direct- 
or* of the Alumni club of Massachu- 
setts and you, as an Aggie alumnus, 
should give it your support. 

Tickets may be obtained from 
Crank A. Anderson, manager of the 
Musical clubs at the college. It is 
suggested that teservations be made 
at once to assist the management in 
making arrangements. 

P. W. Pickard secretary of Asso- 
rted Alumni of Massachusetts. 

I. It. Holland '92, H. D. Haskins 
10 and V. H.Smith *97 have recently 
attended the annual meeting of the 
association ol Official Agricultural 
1 btfl lists held iu Washington Mr. 
Mi-kins was continued on the cora- 
mttte for the investigation of the 
"Htluhility of phospbatic slag. Mr. 
Walker '05 was continued as referee 
lot the chemical methods of deter- 
mining the availability of phosphatic 
Sag, Dr. Holland was appointed a 
Matber of the executive committee 
f the association and Mr. Smith was 
Bade secretary of the Asaocistiou of 
bserteaa Feed Control Officials. 

'•*" —George D. Leavens, presi- 
hnt of the Coe-Mortimer Co., hae 
*ea .langerooaly HI as a result of an 
"'i" '■■■»' iou for a prend iritis. HJ 8 oo . 
■tfcJt has improved in the last few 
sd it is expected that be will 
*eerrr unless something unforaeen 



EXPERIMENT STATION NOTES 

The Massachusett Experiment Sta- 
tion is now distributing the annual re- 
port on the inspection of commercial 
feed stuffs prepared by Philip H. 
Smith assisted by C. L. Heals and J. 
T. Howard. The samples collected 
from luM different places of business 
numbered 1043 and permits have been 
granted for 1 100 brands. Owing to 
the war and to shipments by the 
Pouama Canal the market conditions 
have been abnormal. The sale of 
molasses feed has Increased. The 
use of alfalfa iu prepared foods at 
grain prices is questionable. To pro- 
tect the consumer the station keeps a 
regular ami experienced inspectoi on 
the road for six months collecting 
samples, who is careful to note 
whether the state law is obeyed which 
requires that every feed sniff offered 
for sale shall be properly named and 
guaranteed. Purchasers must, how- 
ever, decide with the advice of the 
station whether or not the feed is 
worth the pi ice asked. 

This bulletiu gives the result of the 
protein, fat and liber determination 
and a statement of certified ingredi- 
ents with a discussion of the feeding 
value of commercial feed stuffs found 
iu the market during the year ending 
Sept. 1. Cotton seed meal has aver- 
aged better for the present year than I 
for the preceding year. It has long 
been considered the most economical I 
and satisfactory protein concentrate l 
that the New England farmer could ! 
buy. 

Dairy men will liu.l at the end of I 
the bulletiu iufonnatiou relating to 
the composition of cuttle feeds, then 
digestibility, method ol measuring 
their efficiency, and rations t.n yoBOg 
stock. 

EXI'KKIMENT STATION SI U- 

'*The Feeding Values of Apple 
Pomace" is the title of one of the] 
latest Experiment station circulars. 
This was written by Dr. J. B. Lind- 
sey, head of the station chemistry 
department, and is a revision of a cir- ; 
cular No. 4 7, now appearing as cir- 
cular No. 58. In a clear and concise 
way it takes up the composition, 
digestibility, experiments with dairy 
animals, and method* of feeding.' 
apple pomace and derives the con- 
elusion that apple pomace is in the | 
same class as average corn silage and 
should lie utilized whereeveravailable. 




LISTEN ! 

* 

Buy that Chiistirfns "ill f«>r your 
••wile," brother, father or friend, 
here and now. We have the finest 
and most complete assortment pos- 
sible of everything that a man needs in wearing apparel. Not 
gimcracks, but useful articles that a man will use ami appreciate. 

A FEW SUGGESTIONS : 

MACKINAWS, $5.00 to $10.00. The famous Patricks. 
MANHATTAN SHIRTS, $1.50 to $2.25. Soft and stiff cuffs. 
REVERSIBLE COLLARED SHIRTS, $1.00 to $3.50. S.** fine 

offerings in silks. 

H. AND P. GLOVES, 50c to $5.00. Lined or unlined. Fur lined 

01 silk lined. 

OAKES PURE WORSTED SWEATERS. Beat at any , rice. $5.00 
to $7.00. 

MUFFLERS IN EITHER SILK OR WOOL, 50c to $3.50 
COLLAR BAGS, $1.00 to $2.00. 

ALTMAN CRAVATS, BATWINGS OR FOUR-IN-HANDS, 25c, 
50c, 65c and $1.00. 

LEATHER BAGS AND SUIT CASES. All solid cowhide, $5 00 
to $10.00 

FULL DRESS LINKS AND STUDS Separately 01 i.. acta. 25c to 
$1.50. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



/■ 



"" .lames W. Kellogg has re- 

wnth been appointed chief chemist 

!hl 1'eunaylvania department of 

»|rieuHnre. 

Keeri 



Jwtupi 



On Nov. 19, a son, Frank 

was born to Mr. and Mrs. 

Bailey at Wareham. This 

aner of second place in the 

••on teat. Bailey expects to 

isana in a few weeks where 

come a partner in a 2100 

Ifu and potato ranch. 

iyru to Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 

Weaver on July 8, a son, 

tek, Jr., at Highiand.N.Y. 



1 W.i- |K TMK KXCKKIJHl s 
Tiou STAFF 

Charles W. Davis ami C. F. Het- 
tinger have been appointed to fill va- 
cancies in the experiment station 
staff, Mr. Davis is a last year's 
graduate from New Hampshire state 
college ami Mr. Hettinger is a 1913 
man from the University of Maine 
and has since then been tnkiug grad- 
uate work at the Mass. Institute of 
Technology. 

These appointments are to fill the 
vacancies left by the resignations of 
Walter S. Frost, who came hen 
from Tufts, and Norman II. Borden 
of Rhode Island. Mr Frost has ac- 
cepted a position as Assistant in Soil 
Chemistry to Prof. T. L. Lyon at 
Cornell University and Mr. Borden 
has accepted a more lucrative posi- 
tion in Washington in the Depart- 
ment of Insecticide Chemistry. 



EL Frank Coe Fertilize rs 

1 QC7 THE BUSINESS FARMERS* STANDARD 1Q1 C 
lODl FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS 1 Zf 1 D 

Your Opportunity 

The editor of one of our leading agricul- 
tural papers writes us under date of January 
12th, 1915, as follows .*- 

"I am doing all I can to induce farmers to 
plant grain crops this year. 

"Grain is very high sod it is going higher. 
Wheat is going to $2.00 per bushel and other 
grains wiU share in the advance. Wheat costs 
$2.50 per 100 pounds now, and pound for 
pound oats cost as much. 

"It feenu to me that the eastern farmer's 
salvation is to buy plant food and grow 

CORN, WHEAT, BARLEY, 
OATS AND BUCKWHEAT 

"Last fall I doubled my acreage of winter 
wheal and this spring I shall triple the acreage 
of oats. I managed to produce 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre, and sold the straw at 
$ I 7.00 per ton in the bam." 

THE OPPORTUNITY IS YOURS! 

Be sure that you buy 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

They are available plant foods that more than meet the 
exacting requirements, giving plump, sound, full head* of grain and vigor- 
ous, healthy straw. 

Eastern users of E, Frank Coe Fertilizers are raising 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre. The average for thr United States for three years 
is I4i'n bushels to the acre. 



\ 



THE OPPORTUNITY IS YOURS I WILL YOU MAKE THE MOST OF IT ? 



k 







The Coe-Mortimer Company, SI Chambers St 



, N. Y.J 




8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 14, W l 5- 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now lucilcil uvel |.usl uince. U (■ '»»*' ll'K 1 " 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal 1 icktt >y;>teiii 



lei. Jf»M 



SHOE STOKE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open -nttul.iy from 7-12. On your way to I'. 

The Highland Hotel 

Comer ol Hillman ana Haines. Mieet-., three 
blocks irom the Union Depot, u a modern hos- 
telry run on the European eUn. It is just .1 ->t^l' 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the ousiness district. 

Its room* are well tin iiisIhhI and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold ruinuriK 
water in every room, t'rices SI and up; room 
with bath (single) SJl.flo and up. 

It, excellent cuisine and well ventilated diiiinu 
room makes a meal a peasant memory— evei y_ 
thing of the nighest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible mannei 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once an.i w.u will 
anticipate staying there again. MbmC every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Otters courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestiy 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan* 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 

Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



Highland Motel, 



SIM Mlljlli LI. >!.,-». 




E 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated oooklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 




RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student rurnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

E, D. MARSH KSTATK 

Cox Sons & Vining 

•ji Madison Ave . New York 

Caps 
Gowns 
Hoods 

for all Degree* 

ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLER8Y AND CHOIR 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

37 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mats, 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

CfritH »«h Mm* r A. M *n A M 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee oil lutercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'd Association. 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteeu Hundred Sixteen ludcx. 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

M. A. C Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
S. W. Hall, Piesideut 
R. L. Holden, Manager 
A. W. Spauldiug, Manager 
L>. A. Ricker, Manager 
C. A. lluutiugtou, Jr., Manager 
N. Moorhouse, Manager 
H. Aiken, President 
J. T. Nicholson, Manager 
F. A. Anderson, Manager 
L K. Fielding, Manager 
F. W. Mayo, Manager 
K. L. Messenger, Manager 
A. J. Hicks, President 
K. h. King, President 
C. H. Gould, President 
R. F. Taber, President 



WKNEKUU BOOR \t. ► n 1 •>. 
Both »exes. for best seller published. Particular 

and outfit free. 
(1K(I. W. «OMKIM. »-!«. »«• AugOBtlne. Ma, 

COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



There are Se»«-ni .1 llttMMWM v.i.i.ould 
buy your 



COAL 

or 

R. ELDER 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 




RAHARS MN 

Northampton, MmSfllUSSttS 

EUROPEAN PtAM 

I "he U#»t ITare to IHne 

iii«H» PMM MtMUl MUtrAnr.h 

All Kind* of Sea Feod 

M-c«at Lanehewn tmm il* to! p,». 

Special Dishes at Ml Hours 

R. j, RAH AR, Prop. 




The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Ml., alongside tbt 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old I >e«rfield. thence to Green- 
field, Turner* Fails and across the 
"Plains'* to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

80 Mile* of Trackage -flodern 
Equipment- TrsM Dispatch- 
ing System Freight and Ex- 
press >erv ke over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Comoanv 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE BHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave AQOIB COLLEGE for HOI- 
YOKE at IS m»B. past tko hour. 

CARS 

Lmvo AMHEKST for AO(ilH COL- 
LEGE St 7 and 37 mln. past the hour. 

Cava at 



AMHERST t SUNDERLAND SI. It. CO 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 



For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished eaamptes of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons. 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniform.. " 

14*4-1426 Chentnut St*, FMUdeiphia, Pa, 



1 is 1 TBHPMY i«a wi< »w 

qaasiilai masfft* Rm "« 

<j„irk-.t a awle a . H*Wi*i !*«»*»* rri* 

"^TJsWi^K^r'inrTc 

HI, rHAHKMN. I'tfll' 
Rmt Naah Br% Ambarat Ttl N« N* < 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Co. 

•if Cbaatnut St., Philadelph • 

Jewelers and Silversmith* 
.....Diamond Merchant 

t% omciai mm **• 



.»• 



sr aoi alists III 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, * ,,u ** 
Mags, Cbarmt ...... Prises. T 

Medals Cot lags Was, Fe*» *^* 

R,n,a, Chirmi .*, .** 





MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVI. 



DEATH OF ROLLIN H. BUCK 
GREAT SHOCK TO COLLEGE 



Member of Class of 1918 Passes Away 

at Infirmary after Short Illness 

with Pneumonia. 

Rollii) 11. Buck '18, died of pneu- 
monia at the college infirmary Dee, 
l«'.. ufter an illness of hut four days. 
Book contracted a cold the week be- 
fore, but in spite of it attended the 
Inst Informal where the fatigue and 
• \|iosure brought on pneumonia. He 
entered the infirmary on Sunday, 
growing rapidly worse until his death 
on Thursday evening. His father, 
mother and two sisters were with him 
at the end. 

He was horn in Holden on .Ian. 10, 
I *'.»!. and lived there until six years 
ago when he moved to '.IN Chatham 
si net, Worcester. He attended the 
llolden schools and was a sophomore 
ui the high school when he trans- 
pired to Worcester. There he hi- 

I the English high school and 
»t once became prominent in at fa- 
ll' tics. He was substitute guard on 
tin; football team in the fall of 11*11, 
and the nest spring came into coo* 
siderable notice as one of the best 
'"'Mg distance runners of the school. 
In the fall of 19! J In- won the high 

•ol cross country series and was 

elected captain of the track team bis 

i sear. 

Buck entered M. A. ('. in Septcm- 

1913, and pledged Bettn Kappa 

Phi. He did not attempt running as 

doctor had warned him of a weak 
m nt. The second year however he 

"i on his class football team and 
Hade his numerals, and was also 

•ml string varsity This year he 
played in many of the varsity games 
ami was considered a prominent can* 

lie for next year's eleven. He 
planning to major in Microbi* 

<nles his parents, .Mr. and Mrs. 

1 .1. Buck, he leaves two sisters, 

M l -Sarah L. Buck and Mrs. Ham 

1 Williams, both living in Wor- 

i The funeral services were 

1 from the First Baptist church 

Sunday afternoon, Rev. Allyn 

g Kosiei officiating, and many of 

''•imcr classmates and school 

••Is were present. Burial was in 

me Grove cemetery in Holden, 

I'liincement of Buck's death 

uule in chapel Friday morning 

•-• vacation, and appropriate ser- 

were led by Dean Edward M. 



hi. 

fr 

It: 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 4, 1916. 



No. 13 



THE COLLEGE PURPOSE 

■■To be at home in all lands and all ages ; to count nature u familiar 
acquaintance, and art an intimate friend ; to gain a standard for the 
appreciation of other men's work and the criticism of one's owu ; to 
carry the keys of the world's library in one's pocket, and feel its re- 
sources behind one in whatever task he undertakes ; to make hosts of 
friends among the men of one's own age who are to lie leaders in all 
walks of life ; to lose oneself in generous enthusiasms, and cooperate 
with others for common ends ; to learn manners from students who are 
gentlemen, and form character under professors who are Christians ; 
— these are the returns of a college for the best four years of one's 
life." 

l'lfxitltllt Hyilf,i>t lli>ir,l,,i,i Cnllri/, 

Holiday Greetings from 

Kenton L. Bii u.ui ikuj. 



COPLEY PLAZA CONCERT IS 
FEATURE OF MUSICAL TRIP 



"(mibmed Clubs Well Received on 

Successful Christmas Tour of 

Boston and Vicinity. 

Successful socially and financially — 
a brief summary of the second annual 
trip of Musical elalm in Bo»ton and 
vicinity. In fact, last Friday night, 
the clubs completed the best trip in 
their history, a trip made up of six con- 
certs in five days, and every conceit 
successful. The big feature was the 
concert and dance in the Copley Plaza 
Hotel on Tuesday night. Dec. 2*, 
which was well attended by the un- 
dergraduates and their friends. 

The first engagement was Dec. 27 
at Marlboro. Under the auspices of 
the Cnion Club nf that city, a Win- 
ter Garden Cabaret was given at- 
tended by almost 1000 people in the 
Pastime Hall. Tables were arranged 
about the hall and a varied program 
of selections by the Glee ami Man- 
dolin clubs, the quartet and soloa by 
Worlfaley, combined with occasional 
dancing was enjoyed by alt. The 40 
men who made the trip were enter- 
tained at dinner by the I'nioii club. 
and spent the night at the homes of 
members of the club. For an initial 
concert, the Marlboro engagement 
was a credit to the college. Conch 
Knipfer of the Mandolin club said, 
"In all my experience ss a college 
coach. I have never seen an initial 
concert that was given with such 
smoothness and so exemplified by 
tine work, m the entertainment offered 
by the clubs at Marlboro," 

Tuesday night, the Copley Flaxs 
Hotel was invaded, and the clubs 
gave their finest concert of the trip 
and the best in the history of the 



I 



1 1 untlnnad on p*a*a fd 



HOCKEY TEAM LOSES TO 

DARTMOUTH AND M. I. T. 

Shinny Playing Characterizes Large 

Part of Both Games. Buttrick 

Keeps Scores Down. 

Defeated by both Dartmouth ami 
M. I, T . the Aggie hockey team 
opened its season at the Boston Arena 
rather inauspicioiisly to say the least. 
Teamwork was conspicuous by its 
absence and but for the goal keeping 
of Buttrick the score would have run 
considerably higher than it did. 

Dakimoitii I, If. A. C. 0. 

Poor team work and the greater 
individual brilliancy of the Dartmouth 
team resulted in a 4-0 victory for the 
Green over M. A. ('. at the Arena 
Wednesday evening Dec. 'JU. The 
Aggie team tried hard enough but 
they were not up to the task of de- 
feating the well balanced team of slick 
wielders from the New Hampshire 
iiistiiuin.il. Had Aggie not had the 
services of Buttrick in the goal there 
is no doubt but what the score would 
have been much larger, Buttrick 
stopped all kinds of impossible shots 
and many limes was the only person 
between two Dartmouth men and the 
net. Many of the ghofg that he 
shoved his faodv in the way of were 
labeled as sure goals but the Aggie 
goal guardian proved to be right on 
the job and he only lost four. 

Of the balance of the team there 
in not much that can be said for they 
•bowed little in the way of team play 
and they did not measure up to their 
Dartmouth op|>onent«. Dartmouth 
played a good game but not a spect- 
acular one. Their forwards had a 
tendency to bunch in the middle of 
the ice and this spoiled their team 

Lt'ontlnuad as page a j 



CANDIDATES FOR INDOOR 

TRACK BEGINS PRACTICE 

With Oood Nucleus of Last Year's 

Men to Build on, Fast Team 

is Expected. 

The indooor track season opens 
this week with work which will be 
very similar to than of last winter. 
The varsity team will have its usual 
series of dual relay races, and will 
probably compete at the B. A, A., 
and the Coast Artillery meets in Bos- 
ton, and at Hartford and Providence. 
This means that a team of Aggie men 
will have an opportunity to remind 
some 20,000 people that Massachu- 
setts has a college worthy of its name. 
The team this year ought to rank a 
little higher than it has for the last 
year or two, foi with Coach Dickin- 
son in charge, with a good nucleus of 
veteran men to draw from, and with 
more men interested than ever before 
prospects look good for a fast team. 

Coach D- S. Dickinson will be on 
the track vwry afternoon and ready 
to help every man who is interested 
in track. He is a man who knows the 
art of indoor running, and given good 
material can turn out a winning team. 
The Coach himself ran on one of the 
fastest, if not the fastest reiay team 
this college ever sent out, and anyone 
who has ever seen a team which he 
has coached run, can vonch for bis 
ability to give to the men the results 
of his experience. 

As last wiutei, a series of Inter- 
cotmt y races are to be run, and medals 
have been offered by the Coach for 
the leading team at the end of the 
■erics. A schedule of races baa been 
arrargeo so that teams from all Mas- 
sachusetts counties are to be i epi • 
sen ted. ss well as teams from New 
York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and 
a team made up of all others not in- 
cluded in the above This will make 
a aeries of some 116 races, ami this 
veai . in order to offer a little more 
inducement to fellows interested in 
running, these will probably be so 
arranged that on certain afternoons, 
probably Wednesdays, a aeries of 
some seven ot eight races will be run 
off. 

All men interested should get their 
candidates together, elect a Captain* 
manager, and start practice, for the 
first races will probably come on 
Wed oesd ay , .1 a n . 12. 

The annual intcr-clasi indoor meet 
will come about the first of March. 
All events will be scheduled aa far as 













The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 1916. 



is possible, and any but track letter 
men are eligible. Preceding this 
meet there will be a series of Inter- 
class relay race, from which all track 
letter men will be barred. The Inter- 
class relay this year will be along the 
Hound-Kobin type, and will be run 
and scored as follows : 

The first relay shall be of two laps 
the captains shall draw to determine 
which team they shall run first, and 
following these two prulimiuary races 
the two winners will race, and the two 
losers will race. The winning learn 
of the winners scores five ("») points, 
the losing team of the winners three 
(8) points, and the winning team of 
the losers one (1) point. 

The second relay shall be of three 
laps, and the conditions of the three 
lap nice shall be the same as that of 
the two lap, scoriug the same. 

All men interested in spring track 
ought to begin to take care of them- 
selves, and plan on a stiff season, 
the spring schedule is to be a full one, 
and hardei than any which this col- 
lege has had for a number of years. 
Weight men and hurdlers are needed 
to balance up the team, mid all men 
interested are urged to get busy for in 
these two lines practice counts 
especially. There is certainly plenty 
of weight material here if the men 
will become interested. 

At the last meeting of the Athletic 
Board, the following men \\eu 
awarded the « . If. c. ; Harold Aiken 
'10 ; T. \V. Glover *6 ; K. S. Hich- 
ards 'i$; E. S. Kussell '16. 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 



CHANGES MADE IN 

EXTENSION SERVICE 



The resignation of Beiijumin W. 
Kllis :\:\, assistant state leader in 
charge of county agent work took 
effect during the vacation. Kllis left 
to take up the management of his 
own farm in Bridgewater and also to 
take charge of a dairy farm in South 
Weymouth. 

S. R. Parker '04, has taken Mr. 
Kllis' place and holdn the position of 
assistant state leader in charge of 
county agent work, being both fed- 
eral ami college representative. Mr. 
Parker spent seYeral year* in Hawaii . 
after hit graduation, as a teacher 
and on a large plantation. From 
there he came to Hanlwiek, Mass., 
to manage Dr. Samuel J. Mister's 
1800 acre farm in that town. This 
farm was noted for its line Guernsey 
herd and was frequently visited by 
the M. A. C. dairy students. About 
two years ago Mr. Parker became as- 
sociated with the Franklin County 
Farm Bureau In Greenfield, where he 
has been until he came to Amherst. 



At Wednesday Assembly, Dec. 1.0, 
Hon. Klmer A. Stevens of Boston 
gave an interesting, though some- 
what rambling talk on "Some Obser- 
vations." A summary of his ad- 
dress follows : 

We are living in a rather peculiar 
time, when the pendulum is swinging 
back to saner conditions. Corpora- 
tions and many other organizations 
have been suffering in time past from 
over-capitalization, and more recently 
from over-agitation. It is hard to 
know which has had the greater ef- 
fect. These times are passing, how- 
ever, and better times are very near. 
College men, above all others, 
should not shun political positions. 
Bills relating to so many diffeient 
phases of business are brought up 
at each session of the legislature 
that only the exceptional man is com- 
petent to distinguish between the wise 
and the unwise. Lack of intelligent 
consideration of these bills is in 
large measure responsible for the 
multiplicity of laws in the Common- 
wealth, where without the counsel 
of a lawyer, a man never knows 
whether he is obeying or disobeying 
the law. 

Speaking of the opportunities for 
Agriculture in New Kngland, Mi. 
Steveus said that many western men 
are coming back to New Kngla id to 
live and carry on their l.usiness. 
Massachusetts has not been devel- 
oped as yet ; there are hundreds 
of acres lying idle, especially on 
Cape Cod, which is ideal for poultry 
raising. We import from the west 
and surrounding states a much greater 
supply of poultry provisions than we 
raise ourselves, and the same is true 
of all kinds of foodstuffs. 

In the neai future a bill will proli- 
iiMv be put through the Massachu- 
setts legislature providiug a compre- 
hensive plan for the drainage and 
development of the waste lain Is 
within the state. This development 
should, however, be made compul- 
sory. Some of the best corn I a ml in 
Illinois is a reclaimed swamp. In 
many other states of the west land 
development is carried on to a 
large extent. Many acres in New 
Kngland ooaW like wise be made 
profitable by some such plan. 

In closing. Mr. Stevens told his 
hearers that if one wants to succeed 
in business he must start out with 
the idea of being always absolutely 
honest. The trusted men of today 
are the ones who have proven them- 
selves at all times to be square ami 
upright in their business dealings. 



PROMINENT ALUMNUS 

DIES IN NEW YORK 

George D. Leavens '97, Was President 
Of The Ooe-Mortimer Company. 

By the death of Mr. George D. 
Leavens '97, in New York on Dec. 21, 
the college has lost one of her most 
brilliant alumni and the business of 
agriculture one of her best workers. 
Mr. Leavens entered college in the 
fall of 18U3, and graduated with the 
class in '97, He was unique in his 
position in college, for he was a city 
boy who came here to get the educa- 
tion which would enable him to take 
up farming. Following his gradua- 
tion be spent nine mouths in the fer- 
tilizer division of the Experiment 
Station, and left there in the spring 
of 189K. He began farming in the 
town of Grafton, near Worcester. 
He very soon attained a leading 
place in the town, and interested the 
fanners in modern methods of agri- 
culture. He was able to take his 
theories which he had learned in the 
class-room, and put them into suc- 
cessful operation. He was known as 
the man who raised one of the largest 
corn ci ops in Worcester County. 
His activities extended into the 
church and school committee of the 
town of Grafton* 

The continued use of commercial 
fertilizers led to buying large quanti- 
ties, and was the beginning of his 
acquaintance with the Coe-Mortimer 
Company. He soon took an agency 
foi their goods, ami after a few 
years of ■QCOOMfol farming he fol- 
lowed the business to New York and 
began as Agricultural Kxpert and 
second Vice-president of the t'oe- 
Mortimei Company. His expert 
knowledge, his successful methods of 
business, and his ability to do large 
amounts of of work led to his being 
made president of the company some 
years ago. 

In college he was always a leader 
of die class ; tarred a yeai as class 
president, and was editor-in-chief of 
the college paper during his senior 
year. He was a member of the Phi 
Sigma Kappa fraternitv. 

C A. P. 



■ UNDER COVER " CHOSEN 

FOR NEW PROM PLA 

Cast Selected and Rehearsal* Und« r 
Way. New Talent from Fresh- 
man Clans 

The Prom guestB will be treated t , 
an unusually fine entertainment 
the production by the Roister Dols- 
ters of "Under* Cover," the gre 
success of the New York season l».-i 
winter. This melodrama was from 
the pen of Roi Cooper Magrue who 
has this season added to his laurels 
the wonderful success "Under Fire.'* 
and who also wrote " It Pays to Ad- 
vertise." The original east m 
played in New York starred William 
Courtenay, DeWitt C. Jennings, 
Pheobe Foster, Rae Selwyn, Lily 
Cahill, and other popular people of 
the stage. The cast as selected bv 
the Roister Doisters promises am- 
ateur stars as great in their way as 
the professional actors whose parts 
they take. 

The cast as selected for the Proai 
production, subject to later revision, 
follows : 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 1916. 



James Duncan. 
i I :i ri > (iiltlis, 
.Sarah Psabod] . 
Peler, 

Daniel Taylor. 
Ethel Cartwrtght, 
AH--.- Harrington, 
Nora Kuileilu'-. 

Amy Ceita right, 



K. .1. Morton H» 

II. Warren il 

D. T. Neubold 'b> 

V 1 IUanpie.1 *\1 

W. II. McNaimht '1* 

.1. II. Smith 'if 

f, A. Andrews Hi 
C. Wilber 17 
W. Sawyer "I* 
Michael Banrlagtoo, »■ Cls'k ' |,i 

Lambert, *. » Majfo'tf 

Monty Vaughn, K. S. Storkwell - 1« 

Btepheo Dauby, .1. T, Nicholson l»i 

The parts of Stephen Denby sad 
Ethel Cartwright are the "leads" of 
the play. Some excellent talent 
seems to have appeared in the fresh- 
man class, especially among candi- 
dates for the ingenue parts, both 
being at present held by new men. 
New costumes and special scenery 
have been purchased for the prtxlue- 
tinn, and preliminary rehearsals ire 
being rushed in order to have time to 
bring the details up to the highwt 
possible perfection In the v.r\ 
limited time left before the Prom. 



ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 

Athletic supplies as required by the 
department of Physical Education are 
now on sale at the office in the Drill 
Hall at the following prices; 
( i y m suits 8 pieces il .00 

Sneakers (high) 11.15 

Suction shoes #3.00 

itshirts SI. 25 



•07,— Harry R. Francis is devel- 
oping a substantial line of landscape 
extension sendee in New York state. 
At the meeting of the American 
Civ ic association in Washington, Dec. 
il, he delivered an address "How 
New York educates Its People 
through the Landscape Extension 
Service." 



PROF, HICKS READS PAPER 

AT NEW YORK MEETING 

M. A. C. Represented At Important 

Athletic Councils Held Recently, 

Dean Lewis, Professor Hicks and 
Mr. H. M. (lore of the department of 

physical education represented M. A. 
C. at the meeting of the Athletic 
Research society, held at the Hotel 
Astor in New York, Dec. 27. On 
the following dsy they attended the 
meeting of the National Collegiate 
Association also at the Aitor. Wed- 
nesday. Dec. *2'». Professor Hicks 
read a paper on the "Construction of 

An Athletic Kifild," before the Society 
of Directors of Physical Education in 
College. This meeting was held at 
the Columbia University Graduate 
Club. 

Th«' M A. C representatives were 
also present at the meeting of the 
Intercollegiate Association of Ama- 
teur Athletes of America, Dec, 80, 



LARGE ENROLLMENT OF 

SHORT COURSE STUDENTS 

The annual ten weeks* course of- 
fered at the college during the winttr 
months opened Tuesday, Jan 1. 
About 175 students registered for the 
M courses which will be offered this 
year. The Y. M. C. A. has takes 
over the rooming proposition, *™ 
the result that much of the etaTa*** 
noticed in previous years has i«e« 
averted, The Y. M. 0, A.*Is» will 
give a reception Thursday evening it 
7-45 in the Social Union Boom* h> 
honor of the Short Course mm 
Light ref reshments will be sen 



GYM ASSISTANTS 

The following men have be I 
pointed assistants in physical * 
tion for this year : Schlatter!*- 
Darling *I6, Harris '10, Bolt- 
Dillon '18 and F, Grayson f 18. 



i Bi 



f ft 



HYSICAL EDUCATION 

DEPARTMENT REGULATIONS 

The Department of Physical Kdn- 
ation requires three hours of physi- 
■d exercise per week from Jan. 1 to 
\pril 1, of the three lower classes. 
Kvery man is expected to take at 
.'.ast one hour of exercise each week 
la some form of outdoor exercise. 

The following out-of-door spin is 
will be considered as equivalent : — 
cross country walking, skating, 
-now-shoeing or skiing. However, 
equivalents may be accepted by pre- 
arrangement with the office. The 
equivalent cards for this one hour 
outside credit must be handed into 
the Physical Education Office by 
twelve o'clock noon of soeA Sctiurday, 
No excuses will be taken for neglect 
to comply with this rule. Credit for 
the other two hours required work 
will be given for the following equiv- 
alents : 

1. Gym Work. There will be 
(Jym Classes the last two hours in 
ttie morning and last two hours in 
the afternoon every day but Satur- 
day. Classes start promptly at 
twenty minutes past the hour. For 
all indoor work the following equip- 
ment is required : white track jersey, 
trsek pauts, and soft-soled shoes. 
Only oue hour of gym eredit may be 
taken in one day. Ample time will 
l>e given at the close of each gym 
period for a bath ami every man is 
tenanted to take one. Equivalent 
<:irds for gym work must be bunded 
to the instructor on the floor at the 
Uginning of each class period. 

2. Members or candidates for the 
li >rkey, track or class basketball 
teams will be given equivalent credit 
for work done, provided each man 
reports to the instructor or the stu- 
deal manager in charge for his credit 
foi attendance each week. The men 
themselves are held responsible for 
this weekly checking up for attend- 
ance and nobody else. 

'•'•■ There will be a trek held 
eu-fv Saturday afternoon, for 
« liieh three-hour credit will be given 
for the following week. These treks 
will leave the Drill Hall at one o'clock 
i' m. sharp. Equivalents cards are 
t" he handed to the Trek Leader at 
tli- sad of the trek. 

I Credit will be given ont-of 
'I"! sports and other forms of exer- 
da to the extent of the other two 
alent hours, provided arrange- 
tut «ii is made at the Physical Educa- 
1 I Mllee he/ore the work is taken. 
' U /rill not !><• qii'vn for work that 

•'il nithftut nuperrixinii «ii/cm fttf 

i ■•« tt'jement , and equivalent cards 
tm iiis pre-arranged work must he 
'" I Physical Education Office by 
1- -lock noon of each Sstuiday. 

V n taking special exercises should 
■t arrangements with Professor 
Hit at once. Members of varsity 
will have their requirement re- 
frora three to two hours per 
Wf One hour credit per week will 
'"* • n for rifle shooting, provided 



the equivalent cards are signed by 
Sergeant Smart. Absolutely no 
credit will be given for men baking 
gym work unless uniforms are clean. 

HOCKEY 

[t'lmiiiiiieii from iiasre i ] 

work to a large degree. Tyler and 
Geran played the best game for the 
Green and Chisholm and Woolev were 

the best skaters for Aggie. 

Dartmouth got the jump at the 
start and caged the (irst goal about 
a minute after the start of the game, 
It came as a result of a pass from 
Tyler to Hepcroft who scored. Cap- 
tain Murchie and Geran showed some 
good team work at this point and 
there is nodoubt hut what they would 
have scored had it not been for Rut- 
tiick who swept aside a number of 
haul shots. On a face oil in front 
of the goal Tyler snapped the puck 
in for the second point. This ended 
the scoriug for the first half. 

In the second half Geran was put 
off the ice and during his absence 
the Aggie team appeared to get going 
but poor shooting resulted in ft scar- 
city of goals. When Oeran came 
back into the game tin attack shifted 
and Muttrick had to stop all kinds of 
shots. Cousins got a goal on ft 

rebound shot and followed it up n 

niotiient latei by another of the same 
kind. This ended the scoring fur 
shortly afteiwaid the whittle bleu 

The line-up | 

Il VIM Ml" m. \ < . 

Holme*. Kan born, iw 

rw.Saml.-is.. ii. H ili.i.u, ri-hiT 

ivier, i- Female* 

"i. i i. • IiUIm.Im, 

[(aj I'luli , •miiii h. < ..ii-.-ii.. i\\ Iw .W.M.Ii-v 

tialc. Walker, (.'nrrler, t*p < \>. Wthlnn 

Mim hi.\ p p. Pluisre.l 

N l""-e, u L .. Ilutf rick 

Sn.re Hard nli I, \| . \. i n 

Uoala i .his. I,- 1, UaMi.iii. Tyler, i ni- 

l>.M.<h .'lllll Kill l|l|l I Ml., .'II 

minute r»eii<Mt», 

M. I. T. 1. M. A. C. 0. 

In a doable bill, with the Dart- 
mouth vs. II A. A. game as the other 
attraction, tin- M. A.C. hockey team 
met defeat at the hands of the M I. 
T. team at the Boston Aiena on New 
Years eve, one goal, scored early in 
the game, winning for Tech. 

The game was culled at Mi and at 
the start promised to be interesting 
but after the first few minutes there 
was very little real hockey, though 
the speed of the B. A. A. fame may 
have detracted some from the appar- 
ent speed of the college gaUW. So»B 

after the game started, Captain Chis- 
holm look a bad fall and was in a 
dazed condition and later left the 
game for a short lime as a result of 
tie fall. In the first period, also. 
Plaisted was put off the ice for a 
period of three minutes and it was 



would lose it and for the most part it 
see-sawed back and forth around the 
middle of the rink ami only once or 
twice was either goal in danger. 
Woolev, with his puok carrying and 
ability to hug the edge of the rink, 
was the most interesting feature of 
the second period. 

Between the halves of the game, 
the Aggie men had the opportunity 
of seeing "Det" Jones and "Jack" 
Hutchinson, the former Aggie hockey 
stars, in action with the B. A. A. 
and they are still in their old time 
form. With "Kamic" Skilton, B. 
A, A.'s all round athlete, they form 

a combination hard to beat. 

The line-up of the game was : 

m. \. V. 
WotilcN , l« 
Fernalil, e 
rhisholin. i 

Kandsrson, Palmer, i « 

\\ iiilmi. ■]• • 

I'laiste.l. p 
llllttllik, u 



An I !«peclall) Uood CommUslon PronoalKon— 

i .isli fin test urclfis Artule wldch AdVertittd— 
Cuts liuwii H«|i>nsi' in t>i.«t-i i l.mts— .Addtcni 
KNi.INKHRINi. M'FI'IV t o., ji;S N gtli Sliest 
P!ill.lili-I|.|ll;l, I'.l. 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Inbhersof Wrought Iron mid Brass Hip*. Valves 
*nd Kittintjs for Steam, Watei ami Ga«. AibMtos 
and Magnesia Boiler and l»it»e Coverings, I'ipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Fngire 
Connections. Holyoke, Mom. 

ItlH-K.M.WS 

Candies and Ice Cream 

** II AMI' »• 



M. I. T. 

I M , TboutM 
c, Tute!t) 

r, fin Inane 
Iw, K.eler 

cp, S\\ ai II 
|i, Him .il \\ :inl 

u, Johnson 
<.nal < urliiaiie. Itelrice* |{. ]{, 

W :i ii;i m.ikiT, Sequin. 



DRILL HALL FOR PROM 

The I!H7 Junior I'mm committee 
has definitely decided that the I'rom 
will he held in the Drill Mali Friday 
.vening Fab. 1 1. and not at the Hotel 
Nonotuck as rumored some time ago. 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our S| M .,i a Jt v _^ n j other good lliiin-s to eat. 

MRS. L. M. 5TEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. 

Tel. 4,5-W 

DR. R. C. BANGS 

Dentist 

NAtH'i BLOCK 

Evenings by Appointment, 

hold Ularrcn 

South Dcerfield. Mass. 

T. .1 AHERN, MAMAGCR 



Burpei 



J Q are supplied every year 

!C S UCCQS (,iri '^ tt» nuirc Ameri- 
can planters than are 
the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914,- a bright new lx)ok of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 



Burpee Building,, Philadi 



««r^ 



hoe 



tore 



SPECIAL NOTICE 



\\\o surprise i<o M. A. C. rnrn .it our storr ! 

Don't buy Footwear till you see us 

IV 12 1 »,\ IWI.> , C4--l>ou.»l«-wear Leather a«*cl. 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 5a Center St., Northampton. Mass., 

and South Hadlcy, 



Maim Officii ; 

1 546- 1 548 Broadway, 

N*w York City 



Thene Si ndtoi offer iht beat *k tiled 
artitts and moat complete 

equipment ohtainablt 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



during this lime thai the singlf score. 
was luiide when the pink slipped l>y 
Huttrick and liiinliil in lln» «jige, 

In tin- second half there was verv 
little hockey of interest Ikiili fi-iuriN 

werea.h to« ar ,v tt„ ,,„< k h.if the Dry and Fancy Goods m6 Choice Family Groceries 

length of the rink, 1 * i ■ r Uere thev 



•DRALRRS IK- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 1916. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 



BOAKI) OF F.DITOltS. 



TYLERS. UOOKRS *16. 
RICHARD W. SMITH '17. 
FRANK J. B( HKI'KKLE'Ui, 
THOS. L. HAKRorKS'16. 
ALFRED A. OIOIOBA 'If.. 
DWIQHT F. UARNKS It,. 
MILFORH R. LA WHENCE '17 



EdRor-tn-Chlef 

MAnaitliiK Edttor 

Assistant Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Alumni Editor 

News Editor 



KLI.IOT IIKNDEKSON It, Department Editor 
WILLIAM SAVILLE. .IR. '17. Campus Editor 
MARSHALL O. LANI'HEAIt 'is. A sso'e Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

CHA8. A. HUNTINUTON. JR. *16, 

Business Manager 
MERRILL F.WARNER 17. 

Assistant Husiness Manager 

LKftTERE. FIELI>IN<i 1H. 

Advert lslng Manager 
JAMES C. l'OW ELL 'IS, Circulation 



leges, bringing them a message of 
faith in the power of religion and ser- 
vice in bringing about better political 
conditions. He travels at his own 
expense and gives his services to the 
colleges which are willing to stand 
back of him. At least fifty students 
must signify their intention of sup- 
porting the campaign before Mr. 
Robins will agree to come to the 
college. 

Lincoln I). Kelsey '17, who was the 
M. A. C. representative at the Robins 
campaign at Princeton a short time 
ago will head the committee in charge 
and has been given power to select the 
men who will work with him. An- 
nouncement of the committee will fol- 
low later. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 6 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Charles A. Hi ntisoton, Jr. 



Entered aa second-clans matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. 



Vol. XXVI. Tuesday, Jan. 4. No. 13 



The dreg in the otherwise pleas- 
ant cup of the Copley Plaza concert 
and dance was the very noticeable 
lack of support by the alumni of 
the college. Official recognition of 
the affair by the associate alumni 
gave promise of at I ast a fair at- 
tendance by the graduates who live 
within a few miles of Boston. Only 
about ten or a dozen were present, 
however, and consequently the great 
benefit the concert was expected to 
provide, that of closer association 
between the graduates and the stu- 
dents, failed completely to material- 
ize. 



RAYMOND ROBINS SECURED 

TO CONDUCT CAMPAIGN 

College Y. M. C. A. In Charge of Meet- 
ings To Be Held Feb. 14-16. 
An invitation has l>een extended to 
Mr. Raymond Ilobint of Chicago to 
conduct an evangelistic campaign at 
Massachusetts Agricultural college 
Feb. 14-10, under the auspices of the 
college Y. M. I • A. Inasmuch as 
two thirds of the colleges who wanted 
Mr. Robins were turned down because 
it was a physical impossibility for 
him ts keep all the engagements. M. 
A. C. is indeed fortunate in being 
able to secure him. While the cam- 
paigu will have an object similar to 
that of the Hurrey Campaign of last 
year, Mr. Robins is a man of an 
entirely different type. 

Raymond Robins started his career 
as ft Iftwyer but left the profession to 
seek gold in the Klondike. Here he 
made his fortune and has been a man 
of Independent means in Chicago ever 
since. He has been most actively 
engaged in politics in Chicago and 
was one of the leaders in the cam- 
paign to clean up the disreputable 
wards of the city. After his success 
in these activities Mr. Robins turned 
his attention to the men of the col- 



SOCIAL UNION CHANGES 

The Ford Peace party has ex- 
tended its influence to the Social 
Union committee's program. Its 
actions are felt here in the cancelling 
of the Ben Lindsey entertainment 
scheduled for the evening of Jan. 8. 
Mr. Lindsey is on the continent as a 
member of the party and in spite of 
his probable desire to keep his en- 
gagement will positively be unable to 
do so. Rather than leave the date 
open the committee has secured Le- 
land Powers for that evening. Mr. 
Powers' subject has not been an- 
nounced but the entertainment will 
begin at 8 o'clock in the auditorium. 
The Faculty entertainment to the 
student body which was on the Social | 
Union program for Jan. 22 has been | 
postponed for a week or two. The | 
faculty committee in charge consists 
of Mr. Forbush of the Extension ser- 
vice, Professor Waugh and Professor 
Lock wood. The committee plans to 
treat the students to an unusual en- 
tertainment, .including a playlet, 
three vaudeville acts and musical 
selections. Announcement of the 
final date will be made next week in 
the Collegian. 



for reference use only. The main 
College library will continue to be 
headquarters for all borrowing privi- 
leges. 

PROGRAM FOR USE OF 

DRILL HALL FLOOR 

The Gym floor is reserved evenings 
for the following parties : 
Monday night, Co-eds. 
Tuesday night, Graduates' Club. 
Wednesday night, 1917 and 1919. 
Thursday night, 191 G and 1918. 
Friday night, Class Games. 
Saturday night. Boys' Clubs. 

For other reservations, managers 
of class basketball teams aud all 
othere desiring use of the Gym must 
obtain same from Mr. Gore at the 
Physical Education office. 

Rubber soled shoes must be worn 
by all men using the Gym floor. 



JUST A FEW OF THE "TITLES" WHICH WE 

HAVE ON HAND TO SHOW YOU 

"WHEN YOU DROP IN" 

Llpldncott's " Kami HMOftlt." 1 *"'*• 

Kirst I'rimipIcH of Agriculture, Vivian 

Principles of Soil Martajremeril . 

Lyon. Pippin. Hiit'kniiiii 

Thv 1'otuto. Kra/i-i 

Koran** Crop*. l'ipto 

Hrooks' Agriculture, H vol*. 
(feeds anil l'.c«lini£, Henri and Morrison 

Vegetable Gftrdantns, watts 

Kami Manaiifiuent, Warren 

Elements of Agrtenitnrei Wane* 

The Kami ami Harden Hule Hook. Hailei 

Manual of Kruit Insects. Hinterland and Croat)} 

Milk and its l'roduits, Wim; 

And others. 

JOHNSON BOOK CO. 

85 Pleasant Street. 
R. A. Mooney H. W. Bishop 



0g LAVAL 

SEPARATORS 

Save in 
7 Ways 

nilAUTITY <>f treuni that no other sepa- 
yUanlll I ijitor will recover complete!?. 

mill ITY of iieaiii as evidenced l.y I >c 
yUALII I 1 jjvalhutter always Hiorinu hiu'li 
est in every Important contest. 

I ARM} i" «' v «' r > *">• b> »" r " in »f '•■<-"'• 
LADun i, e i nK stapler, enetei M •ma mm 

iciiilritiL' no adjustment. 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

Kl-c.l 1 \K SUNDAY SERVICE AT 7 P M. 



TIliE !»>' hours, hj reason of ftl'Mttf I 
IIIHC laxity and the same reasons tin 
save lalMir 



•a- 
hut 



PncT since while a Iw I-a^al may coat a 
UUOl utile more than a tioor se|»rator M 
liegln with, it will last from ten to twenty 
yean while other separators wear out and 
require 10 i»- repUeeri m from one lo live 
years. 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO OKDEK 

Suits Cleaned. Pressed and Dyed All kinds ol 

Repairing for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly dene, 

HiKh-grade work by fitstclass tailor. Work 

called for and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing, 

4 suits for I1.50 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, PROP. 

Main Street, Amherst. Mass. Nash Block 

On your way to the Post Office, Tel. 438-W 



E. E. MILLETT 

JKWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 
Lenses ground while you wait 

COLLBGB JBWBLRY 

Violin. Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Stnt>i« 

AMHKRST, MASH. 
Next to Post Office, 



Amherst 



REFERENCE LIBRARY 

IN STOCKBRIDGE HALL 

There has recently been estab- 
lished in Stockbridge Hall an agri- 
cultural reference library which 
promises to mean a great deal to all 
the people employed in or fre<juent- 
ing the tine new headquarter* build- 
ing of the Division of Agriculture. 

The equipment at the present time 
is not complete but the idea is to 
have always on hand a splendid up- 
to-date collection of the best agricul- 
tural reference book*, bulletin* and 
report* of the experiment station* 
and the United States Department of 
Agriculture and current files of agri- 
cultural journals. A card catalog 
covering »©*t of the material will b# 
of great help to all patron* of the 
library. Miss Ethel Turner, a mem- 
ber of the College library staff, has 
already entered upon her duties and 
will have the particular care of this 
new work in baud. 

It should be understood that this 
collection of agricultural material i* 



PROFIT 



in more and Letter cream, with 
less tabor and effort. 

CtTICCiPTIflU whlrli ran only rome from 
OAllorftOllUn hnowlmt you have the liest 
asMfMet. and He M ••" limes ar. ..in 
pllshtniz the hem possible results. 



THE OE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

166 Hroadway New York 

29 K. Madison St.. Chicago 



GO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts. 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 
a 1 jc 

* l-IC 

48c per riot. 
30c per dor 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1,50 a mm 



AMHERST ROOK STORE 

CURRAN A DYER, Props. 

Loose-Leaf Note Books and fountain 
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Accurately Replaced. Hne Watch Repairing 
Promptly and Skilfully Done. 

r Satisfaction Guaranteed 



R.T. FansT.Agent; D. Shebiwvap, As»t. Arem 

Try oar ticket sv»tem — 

Put full name and address on laundr> 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Floricultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of tut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This Mock 
is grown in modern houses un«!er 
ideal conditions. Roses, cartiat! 
violets, chrysanthemums and ■ 
peas in season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

T. I. .phone 300 

WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photograph 

Including Framing. 

Qood work speak* for Itse' 

Nash Block, Amherst. ** 



NEW HOCKEY RINK 

A new hockey rink is soon to be 

tiilt on the old athletic field under 

lie supervision of Professor Hicks 

ml Lawrence Dickinson, of the 

rounds department. It will be so 

tuated as to be readily flooded from 

he hydrant near the Drill Hall and 

•.ill insure for the hockey team bet- 

■ •: ice conditions than are at present 

; (igsuble. The construction of the 

rink will be based on ideas received 

v Mr. Hicks on his recent trip to 

New York, where he consulted with 

representatives from Beveral leading 

western colleges which have lately 

provided facilities for the sport. 



MUSICAL CLUB TRIP 

[Continued from i«ge 1] 

dubs in the big ball room of the hotel. 
Over 200 people were present, and 
sit least 100 coupler rnjoved daneing 
until is. M. in the (inest hotel hall 
room in the East. Aggie certainly 
was in prominence on this night. 
Manager Anderson was pestered l»v 
nt -wspaper leporters from the time 
(he concert began until "Sons of Old 
Massiu liiiMtls" was sung by all pres- 
ent. The success of the concert was 
due to the loyal support of the stu- 
.ii'iits in college, and the present in- 
dications are that the Copley Plaza 
concert and dance will be an annual 
affair for the Aggie undergraduates. 
Ilingbam was the next engagement, 
ud although handicapped by a com- 
I. inutiou blizzard and rainstorm, 
200 people were attracted lo Loring 
Hull to enj«»y the second annual con- 
cert and dance given by the clubs in 
that town. Everything went off 
■<!iioothly with lhc exception of the 
orchestra which suffered the loss of 
tvM. cornets and three violins. 

Thursday afternoon, a unique per- 

furtnance was given in the Tea Room 

of Pilene's store in Boston, and ac- 

< "i ling to Manager Harlow of 

tlic Kilene store. "The entertainment 

wis bully.*' The festivities were 

lueted in the form of a New 

\ . ir*s Tea. At least 700 people at- 

U 1 led, ami when the concert began, 

evrv table had lieen reserved. Fully 

100 people were disappointed who 

1] lo make reservations in ad- 

v Although it ia usually dilli- 

to obtain applause from an audi- 

thai ia dining, all the numbers 

he program, which was in the 

of a four page calender, were 

• ed. The **Aggie" club* were 

assisted by the Kilene orchestra. 

1 . the evening, a successful concert 

dance wa* given in Waltham in 

Wa» ne hall connected with the canoe 

NultiugB-on*the-Charles. This 

( " rt was run under the auspices of 

W« tubs, and was backed by Wal- 

l| ' ulumni. 

wburyport was next and last. 

A n-ert wa* given New Year's Eve 

1,1 City Hall before 700 people 

U nn by the Alumni Associa- 

The men made such a fine im- 

l' n on that Newhuryport will proba- 



bly be an annual affair in the future. 
During the intermission, the mayor of 
the city presented the high school 
football players with sweaters. After 
the concert, 150 couples adjourned to 
a nearby dance hall and the festivi- 
ties continued until '2 a. m. At mid- 
night, Worthley M* ushered in the 
New Year by singing "A Perfect 
Day." The men were entertaiued 
over night by the people of Newhury- 
port, and [Stunted Saturday morning 
to their homes. 
The program : 

I'UIT o\ 1 

1. TanerediO vert me, KossIbI 

( niie^e Ore best ra. 
1. "Swords Out fot Charlie," Bui lard 

Mr. Wnrihley and Glee Clul. 

B. "Briar i-o*e,' Debota 

Quartette, 

4. "Live Wire," Johnstone 

Mandolin Clul.. 

"1. SuIh, Selected 

Mr. Worth lev. 

5. "NowtheNlgbf InStartlt hplendot,' 1 

flOtn "Lucia dl baininerinooi ,'■ 

Donizetti 

(ilee (lull and Orchestra, 
r \ im TWO, 

7. "Ballet Egyptian," Lnlgfnl 

1. Allegro non truppo 

2. Allegretto 

:\. Andante ■oafBtttO 
4. Andaute ex|»ri»«»ive. 
College Orchestra, 
X. "A little l,o\c, ,\ Little Kiss," 

Silenu 

dies Club, 

9, " A T. ...-!. to Woman Hammond 
l^tiarlelle 

iu. "Bohemian Girl," trmstroug 

Mandolin Club. 

11. "Bolts of Old Massachusetts," 

Kninhi '<ri 

< .. II. I. Hie. I ( llil.s 



1913 NOTES 

Harold B. Bursley. Landscape 
Architect, care J. L. Goo«lwin Asso- 
ciation, Box 447, Hartford, Conn. 

Harold Cory writes that he had a 
very interesting experience last year 
as assistant superintendent of a 
boys' home. » "Red" is now manager 
of the Kberhardt Farm Co., R, 
Stroudsburg, Pa., and is trying to do 
away with the middleman and sup- 
ply farm products direct to consumer. 

Frank Culley ia now Associate 
Professor of Landscape Architecture, 
Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa. 

Albert F. Kdminister received his 
M. S. last June from Oregon Agri- 
cultural College and is interested in 
orcharding at Modoc Orchard, Cen- 
tral Point, Oregon. 

B. Ward Ellis has resigned his 
position on the College Extension 
Department as Assistant State lea- 
der and gone into practical work on 
his own farm at South Wevmouth. 



•OH.— H. K. Hayes is joint author 
of a bulletin on "Experiment* on In- 
heritance in Maize" recently pub- 
lished by the Connecticut Agricultural 
Experiment station. It will be 
remembered, however, that Professor 
Hayes is now in charge of plant 
breeding work In the University of 
Minnesota. 

Prof. Klihu Grant of Smith college 
will give the last of his series of lec- 
tures on Bible History in the Chapel 
Thursday evening Jan. 6, at 1-30. 



CAMPION 

Fine Tailoring 

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Ready-To-Wear Clothes 




F. A. SHERARD 

ME N'S STO RE 

Use Our New Cash Discount Card and Save Five Per Cent 



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Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



FREE FREE 

For ■ few days only here's your chance to get 

FREE 

With a 90c Humidor of Tuxedo Tobacco, a 
GENUINE FRENCH BRIAR 

PIPE 

SEE THEM IN THE WINDOW 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

I he kcxall Mora— On the Comer. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 1916. 



J. G1NSBURO 

ii i-j Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

75c Special Half Sole, Rubber 75c 

KBI'AIHINO 

Black, Tan, White Work Guaranteed. 

i >wn i— • 

K-ibber Soles •!.«» 

Rubber Soles, with Heels . ■ •l.1» 

Soles sewed. ...... ™ c 

■i-S MiIih- for Sl.oo 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DKNTAL ROOMS 

Williams Mock, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: o to n A. M„ i-jo to 5 r. *• 



si'KAM KITTING. Telephone »-K 

GAS KITTING. TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE A CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 
Windows, Lkad Uohts. &c. 

* Clifton Ave.. AMHF.RST. MASS 



You'll Want a New Suit for Christmas 

Select it today. The new styles in Autumn and Winter patterns await 
your inspection. You will want a stylish. Comfortable SUIT or OVER- 
COAT. Step in and examine our line. Stjle is the addition to the latest 
fashion, to your individual need. Custom clo'hes ate designed for YOU, 
IKK simply cut to fit the stocky sized man. Our Grntt' Fvrnk*il»jW Line is of 

The Latest Goods in Shirts and Collars 

Kid Gloves, all styles New Dress Vests at very reasonable prices 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas, It has pleased God in 
His Infinite Wisdom to take unto 
himself our beloved friend and for- 
mer cliiBsmRte Rollin Hugh Ruck, he it 

Resolved, That we, the members 
of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, Class of 1917 do extend to 
his bereaved parents our sincere and 
heartfelt sympathy in this their hour 
of sorrow, and be it further 

Resolvixh That a copy of these 
resolutions be sent to his parents,that 
a copy be inserted in the Massaohd- 
sktts Coi .i.kuian and lastly, that n 
copy be placed upon the records of 
the class of 1917. 

John Dickson Riiuiiaro, l'res., 

John T. Dizkk, Skc, 
For the Class. 

Dec 17, 1915. 



ALL KINDS W KKPaik WORK NEATLY AM> promptly I>ONE 



DYKING 



ALTERING 



CLEANING 



PRESSING 



LABROVITZ, 



Custom Tailor 



■ i ami rv sr 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 



the most economical you can u*e. 

Better CROPb 

are the inevitable result. 




\xz£& 



THE ROGERS * HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletoun, Conn. 

oriw-.- «ml Wotkn, l"«rHm»il, I'««m. 



Huntington Ave., Exeter awl Itlajcden SU., Boston, Mass. 
Headquarters for College Men *hen in the cit j . 

AMOS H. WHIPPLE, psop 



Carptrvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mas*. 



WhcretUy It has pleased Al- 
mighty God in His Inliuile Wisdom to 
take to Himself our beloved friend 
and brother, Rollin Hugh Bttcfc. 
therefore be it 

Rrsnln'ti, That the meiiibeis of 
Beta Kappt I'hi Fraternity do extend 
to his family our sincereM sympathy 
in this their hour of grief, and be it 
further 

ftf t fll WOT, That a <o|iy «' f ,,,ese 
resolutions be inseiibed ti|><m the 

reoorde nf mm Fraternity, ami that ■ 

copy DC publihhed in the M\--\m- 

sk.tts OofcVMtttl vn. 

For the Fraternity, 

Ukn.i. A. Gii.mouk, 
H vmi ki. V. NOYKS, 
RolOHT S. Hoj.hs 



CHRISTMAS GREETINGS 

TO BOYS CLUB MEMBERS 

(i reelings from 1 lie Mnaaathnaefta 

Agricultural college to the Roys* and 
(iiiis* club members of Massachusetts 
were sent out during the holidays in 
the form of a large card printed in 
color* with an attractive rural scene 
and bearing a message entitled "The 
Country" by I'rof. Frank A Waugh 
AUmt -JO.ooo were mailed from Fro- 
fessor Morton* office to the boys and 
girls enrolled in the state club work. 
The card contained the following : 



Now is the time to be planning for 

Fraternity Groups 

— —Have them laken at 

MISS McCnLjELLAirS STUDIO 

44 State Street, Northampton, Maw 



TIIK COI 

Cod made the countiy, and saw that 
it was good, 

Which means that it must be good 1 
for me. 

Its free, honest, straightforw*rd,open 
life 1 its friendly associations ; 
its contacts with nature on theone 
side and with men 011 the other ; 

Its sanity and independence and com- 
fortable living, without poverty 
and without wealth ; 

These are qualities which I seek for 
my own life. On their account 
1 Will love the country, 

I will love the sweet smell of the soil, 
the infinite open sky, the wide 
fields, the solemn forests ami all 
that grows out of the earth ', 

Here 1 would live, finding the substan- 
tial satisfactions of honest work 
fairly requited, of neighborliness 
and goodwill toward men, and of 
genuine service to my country. 



DRILL HALL RENOVATED 

Three barrels of bichloride of mer- 
cury were used during Christmas 
vacation in giving the drill hall a 
much needed cleaning. The floor 
was thoroughly washed with the solu- 
tion and the Bide walls sprayed, so 
that danger from infection will he 
reduced to the minimum. 

The lockers are being repaired by 
the heat and light department aud it 
is expected that all the students can 
soon be accommodated in the drill 
hall locker room. 

A new sidewall will soon be added 
to the handball court which will 
greatly improve the facilities for play- 
ing this game. Haudball is growing 
more popular every year. 

STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

Eric N. Boland '12 Gives Talk on 

"Swine Raising." 

Erie N. Roland '12, now engaged 
in the extension service, gave a very 
interesting lecture before the Stock- 
bridge club on the eveuing of Dec. 
14. Mr. Roland has worked exten- 
sively among the Iowa hog growers 
and thus was well fitted to take UP 
the subject of swine growing, lie 
believes that though Massachusetts in 
not a pork producing state, moie 
stleulion should be given to it. 
There should at the least be enough 
hogs on the farm to utilize the waste 
produced. Even those farmers who 
do keep a few pigs, however, pay n<» 
attention to stock. There is 
noticeable lack of conformity in hogs 
throughout the state. The farmer 
out*! nim for a lwtter stock. Q*e that 
carries a good fattening conforma- 
tion and will finish off early. QmL 
itv is also an important factor. It 
indicates lack of coarseness which Ii 
waste. In fact, quality is more essen- 
tial than conformity. 

Mi . Roland then discussed feeding 
as it is practised in different locali- 
ties. The large hog growers of tin 
west are beginning to realize that 
corn feeding alone is not good. 
They are turning more and more t«> 
the combination of rormge and fat- 
tening periods as usual In the east. 
By this method hogs are kepi in pta- 
turage on some such crop as rape 
until the ground freezes. Then thtv 
are fed on concentrates until Ikes 
finish off. Tsble waste is a big 
source of feed in this state. It U a 
very inexpensive way of hog raising 
but one very open to disease. 

The big question in nog nUsiuK " 
in all other phases of farming, is that 
of marketing. The farmer »h< «' 
study the market just as careful I ■• - 
he does methods of producing. As * 
rule the price of pork takes a • 
about the last of November and • '■■'■• 
not rise again until the latter pot f 
February. The alert seller a^ 
this period, He will sell his hot 
October, though not quite flni I 
off, rather than keep ihetn tfcp (ft 
this period. Many a farmer 
oat by keeping his hogs over 
the market is poor. 



ts 

til 



EXPERIMENT STATION NOTES 

Pot experiments to determine the 
ivailability of phosphoric acid in 
Basic slag are now being carried on 
at the East Experiment Station. 
Ibis work is in co-operation with the 
Basic Slag Committee of the Asso- 
•iatiou of Official Agricultural Chem- 
ists of which Mr. Haskins, head of 
the Station Fertilizer Department, is 
a member aud has charge of the local 
work. The work is a vegetation 
check on the laboratory (Wagner) 
:nothod of determining the availa- 
bility of phosphoric acid in basic slag 
phosphate and similar co-operative 
work is being carried on in twelve 
other states in this country. The 
crops to be grown in the pots are 
rape aud millet, preceded in one 
series by a soy bean crop to be 
turned under to furnish organic ma- 
terial and in the other series by 
f allow. 

The pots used in this work are 
cylindrical in shape, 14in. high, 10 
in. in diameter, and were especially 
designed for this kind of work by 
Dr. Wm. P. Brooks, Director of the 
Kxperiment Station, 

Work on the same lines will be 
carried on out doors during the com- 
ing summer on specially prepared 
plots. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'II. — An attractive magazine pub- 
lished by the College of Agriculture 
at the University of Nebraska print- 
in its December issue an attractive 
illustrated article by Tell W. Nicolet 
on the proposed state farm park. 
This is baaed substantially on land- 
scape studies made by Mr. Nicolet. 



NEW BOOKS IN LIBRARY 

The following volumes have been 
added to the library of the college 
by purchase during the year 1914-15 : 

Vnierlean Journal of Ps y chology, U 

sob. 

\ohiv fur rassen it ml u'esi-llnehaftH binl- 
'•trie, |4 vol*. 

Bailey, Standard cyclopedia of llorii- 

nib ure, vids. 1-3. 
U"» hemim-he zeiUi-rirlll . \»\h. I.". <..". 

1 900-1014. 

Hr.fHil, o. rnterHTu-hnngan sun ilem 
icesammtifelilele <ler m vkoloi/ie.voU. 
11-14, 

ftryutogfet, Wis. 1-18, 1MI»M-1I»|0. Index 
1-10. 

I ''iloruia Academy of gctaace s. OeCsV- 

*ionsl |,a|n-i,. yoIk. 1-7. 

' u&pfiM, Cyclopedia of painter* and 
paintings, 4 vol*, luia 

i'tiiini University studies in history, 

• iniiomi. -h and public law,Vots.&fMK), 

t'oaiptM rendu* hehdoirmdaireit soeiete 
lie blologle, vols. 74-78, 

' ' -.(N-raf ion in Agriculture, vol*. tt-H, 
HU3-10I4. 

n <i|Hiii loademy of Natural Scie nces , 

l'r«M'<»«Miini{>*. vol*. t$-*, lMMM-inon, 

iii^Ki' dcr phvulologie, vols. 1-N, 
008-1014, 

K; Hiilturnl cabinet and rlorwts' maffa- 
itte, Tola. 1-14, 1833-lK4fl. 

,,! -«. Dictionary of Mimic and Musi- 

iiin. S Vols, MM I. 
" and and Ajrriculrural Society of 
iiland TriinwH'tionfl, vote. 1-fi, 
"12-20, 

I Mcnhantm' Masar/me. 18 vote, 
*fional conference on (fonofics 
rni^edinys, vol* 1-8, tSttB-lBOo. 



Internationale mitteilun^eu Kir hodt-n- 
kuude, vols. 1-4. 1011-1014. 

Jahrhtich Uii wiHKeiisrliall lichc iinil 
praktisi-lic tieraucht, voIk. l-tt,MK)«l- 
MM4. 

JahreHberieht iiber die fortHchritle der 
ajiiikultiinlH'iiiie, vols. 10-1(1, 1007- 
1018. 

Journal of hereditv, (Kiiuland'i, vote, -1- 
4, MM 1-1014. 

Journal ol infection* diseases, vols. 1-0, 
1804-191 I. and Supplement 1-4. 

Journal of medical research, vols, 81-85, 
81-82, MHMI-1012. L918, 

Journal of political economy, vols. 1-11, 
1898-1008, 

Kollnidrhemisehe belaefte, vote. 1-4, 
1909-1913. 

National association of corpmatitui 
schools. Annual I'ouveution, vols. 1-2, 
MMH-MM4. 

National cyclopedia of American bioy- 

raphy, vols, 1-14 and liulex. 
National geographic inatja/.iiie, H vote. 

New international encyclopedia, Kd. _' 
vols. 1-12. 

New York Mate vegetable mowers' as- 
sociation report, vols, 1-8. 1011-14. 

New York Tims, vols. Jan, 1014-Junc 
MM.*,. 

Royal Scottish arboriculture! soviet) 

transact ions. vols. 27-20, 1918-1910. 
Scrihiirr'x Mminzinv, vols. 1-20, 1887- 
1800. 

Xcitschrift fur chemie uml indiistrie 
del'kolloide, 1-12, MHN1-MM2. 

Iu addition to the above the fol- 
lowing have been given to the library 
during the year 1914-16 i 

Agricultural (Experiment Station Bul- 
letins and Ueports, 180 volumes. 

American society of agricultural eegi- 
iicit> Transactions, vols. 1-4, loll 
1914. 

famegie Institution of Washington, 

I'uKlications, 14 vuls, 

Ooid, vol*. 1-.'i, 1WOH-1014. 

Farm Managemeni Mouthlv, vols. i:>, 
August, 1018-May, (918, 

i.ii.rnsev Breeder's Journal, vols. |-7, 
1010-1014. 

Hunt s Merchant! Magazine, 18 vols. 
Illinois Slate Koo«l Conimissioii Report, 

12 Vote. MHI1-MM4. 
Indiana department of Heology, 7 vols. 

Intel national institute of Agriculture 

RepoHa ami Bulletins, 12 vols. 
Interstate f'oiiituerce Commission |;,.. 
ports, 8 vols, 

Ireland, Department Of Nirricultural 
and Technical Institute RepOTta, 
vols. 1-14, MSKI-MM4. 

Jersey Bulletin and hairy World, 4 vols. 

Kew Royal Botanic t. aniens Bulleiin ui 
miscellaneous information, .; vols. 

Kimball's Dairy Farmer, 4 vols. 
Massachusetts Boa id of Health Monthly 
Bulletin, 7 vote. 

Mass.iilHisetls Town Hepotts. 1 vols. 
Minnesota * lop lnipio\emeut Assisia 

lion Annual Report, vols. 1-11, BUM- 

MM I. 

National Association of Corporation 
Schools Mullet in, vols, 1-10. 

Sew York city Produce Exchange 

Beport, 14 VOW. 1UU0-IIM4. 
New York state Chamber of Commerce 

Monthly Bulletin, vols, 1-fl, 1000- 

BMo. 
New York State liihersily Convocation 

Proceedings, vote. Mft, 1064-1907. 

I'arke, Davis »v (o. Detroit, Michigan, 
vote, l-H, 1818-1918, 

Princeton University Biology Labora- 
tory ( ontribiitioiis, 2 vols, BM2-IB14. 

Sapp<iro, Japan, College of Agriculture. 
Journal. 4 vote. 1008-BM4. 

State (Irange lie|M»rts,fi vols. 

Tokyo University College of Agriciiltiire. 
Bulletins, 2 vols. 10<hm«h»0. 

Tokyo I'inverslty College of Agrictll- 
lure, Jolillial. 2 VOte. IW0W-J011. 

!', i Department of s gr"u*ui t nre Far- 
mer*' Bulletins. 1-025, 

r "s. Library of Congress IJst of Arner- 

iiiii Doctoral Disseratbm, 2 vols, 

MM2-1W18. 
I". H, licelaniatioii Service, Annnal 

Report, o vols. 1002-1014, 
Washiiigtori Academy «>f Sciences Jonr- 

nal, vols. 1-1, 1»1*1-1»14. 



OUR PRICES ON HIGH-GRADE SUITS 

AND OVERCOATS ARE ALWAYS 

THE LOWEST 

Now to reduce our stock for inventory we are offering our entire 

stock of 

Suits and Overcoats at a Reduction 
of 20% from the Regular Prices 

This stock is made up of Hart Schallner and Marx Clothes to- 
gether with other high-grade lines. 



Stock up on Shirts-Manhattan Shirt Sale 



$2.00 Shirts 
$1.50 Shirts 



Now $1.55 
Now $1.15 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



/Z 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizer s 

1 QC7 THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD 1Q1C 
loo/ FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS lJlO 

Your Opportunity 

The editor of one of our leading agricul- 
tural papers writes us under date of January 
12th, 19 1 5. as follows > 

"I am doing all I can to induce farmers to 
plant grain crops this year. 

"Grain is very high and it is going higher. 
Wheat is going to $2.00 per bushel and other 
grains will share in the advance. Wheat cosls 
$2.50 per 1 00 pounds now. and pound tor 
pound oats cost as much. 

"il reem to me that the eastern farmer's 
salvation is to buy plant food and grow 

CORN, WHEAT, BARLEY, 

OATS AND BUCKWHEAT 

"Last fall I doubled my acreage of winter 
wheat and this spring I shall Inple the acreage 
of oats, I managed to produce 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre, and sold the straw at 
$ 1 7.00 per ton in the bam.** 

THE OPPORTUNITY IS YOURS! 
Bo sure that yon any 



\ 




IL Frank Coe 



•i* 



They are available plant foods that more than meet the most 
exacting requirements, giving plump, sound, full heads of gram and vigor- 
ous, healthy straw. 

Eastern users of E. Frank Coe Fertilizers are raising 40 bushels 
of wheat to the acre. The average tor the United States for three years 
is I 4i'u bushels to the acre. 



the omjsmNTnr is yowb i will you wake the most op it? 



V 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, SI Chambers St, N. Y. 




8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 1916. 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 

EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 



Ni.'«. located over post office. 



U p one Itiy lit 



Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System TM. J 6 "** 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open SuocUy from ft*. On your way to P.O. 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and U.trnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is • modern hos- 
telry run on the European Flan. It is just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business disti let. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices •! and up; rooms 
with bath (single) »l .fto and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meat a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the nighest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science* 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



evening. 



D. H. SIEVERS, 



Hlchland Hotel, 



>im-IiikII<'I<i. Mm*. 



SiIUEIiFIIIUUE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
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LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
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WOODWARD'S 
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a 7 Main St, Masonic Bldg., 
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Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

CUttd <mh Mm I A. M. * 4 A M 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated uooklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan's 

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Thirty-six dozen pens to select fron 

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money refunded." 



DEUEL S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 




Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'.d Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
S. W. Hall, President 

K. L. Holden, Manager 
A. W. Spaulding, Mauager 

D. A. Ricker, Mauager 
C. A. Huntington, Jr., Manager 

N. Moot house, Mauager 

H. Aiken, President 

J. T. Nicholson, Mauager 

F. A. Anderson, Manager 

L. E. Fielding, Manager 

F. W. Mayo, Mauager 

K. L. Messenger, Manager 

A. J. Hicks, President 

E. L. King, President 

( . H. Gould, President 

R. F. Taber, President 



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and outfit tree. 
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COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 

MODERN REPAIR OEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave AOC1IE COLLEGE for Hot • 
YOKE at 15 ml». past Use hour. 



CARS 



T her* are Sere n i >od K*i*ons«rhy voushould 
buy your 



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Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
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A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



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The Best I'lni'r- to M8S 

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The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loal Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerrield, thence to Green- 
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"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
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50 Miles of Trackage -riodern 
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Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
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Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 



M 



For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
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are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

M alters of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

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Medals Colleje Pins, Fobs, SB* 

Rings, Charnot .*. 





JAN 




irml 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 11, 1916. 



AGGIE LOSES ONE OF 

ITS MOST NOTED ALUMNI 



Death of W. H. Bowker '71, for Thirty 

Tears a Trustee, Removes a Loyal 

Friend of the College. 

William Henry Bowker '71, died 
at his residence 295 Bacon Street, 
Boston, Tuesday evening, Jan. 4. 
Rnneral services were held at Em- 
manuel church, Boston, Thursday 
afternoon. The college was repre- 
sented by President K. L. ButterSeld, 
Director W P. Brooks, Dean Lewis 
and Treasurer Kenney. 

Mr. Bowker was born July 3, 1850 
atNatick. Later the family removed 
to Phillipston and it was in this town 
and in the neighboring town of Tem- 
pleton that he received his early edu- 
cation, graduating from the high 
school of the latter town. His father 
desired that be fit himself for the 
ministry, but be had a strong inclina- 
tion toward the sciences, especially 
in their relation to agriculture, and 
he entered M. ▲. C. Oct. 2, 1867, 
ss a member of its pioneer class or 
the "old guard" as he loved to call 
it. He referred to Clark, Goodell, 
lockbridge and Goessmann — bis 
lachers— as the "Big Pour" and 
•peatedly emphasized the encour- 
gement and inspiration he received 
om their teaching and strong 
ersonalities. 

After graduation, July 19, 1871, 

e began his life work as a teacher 

„ nd Journalist and afterwards entered 

ito partnership with his brother 

in the drug and chemical business in 

Boston, Later he associated himself 

with a classmate as a manufacturer 

of fertilizers with a factory at 

Itrighton. This finally led to the 

organization of the Bowker Fertilizer 

Company of which he became 

the president and so continued until 

his death. He was also president of 

I Continued on pa«e 2 1 



HOCKEY TEAM TO PLAY YALE 
AND COLUMBIA THIS WEEK 



LELAND POWERS PLEASES 

WITH "M. BEAUCAIRK" 

Mr. Leland Powers gave a very 
pleasing interpretation of Booth 
I'arkingtou's "Monsieur Beaucaire" 
in the Auditorium Saturday evening. 
The entertainment was under the 
auspices of the Social Union. The 
story, which consists of three acts, 
was very cleverly interpreted and 
ield the close attention of all. At 
lie close Mr. Powers recited Alfred 
^oyes' famous poem "The Highway- 
man. * 



Handicapped by Lack of Practice, Will 

Line Up for Two Hard Games. 

Ross Back at Point. 

The hockey team will go to New 
Haven to meet Yale Wednesday with 
but very little practice. The efforts to 
flood the new rink have not been 
very successful and the team has had 
to work on the pond when possible. 
What the chances of victory against 
the strong Yale team ire cannot be 
predicted, but with the return of Ross 
at point the defensive ability of the 
team will In- greatly increased, while 
his remarkable dashes down the ice 
will be remembered by all those who 
saw the games last year. 

Columbia will be played on the 
campus Thursday, provided tin- ice 
conditions are suitable. The Colum- 
bia team is stronger than the one 
last year, when it met defeat at the 
hand* of ^aptain *-'**' : h#W*« men. 
but Aggie looks for a victory. 

The Freshman hockey team is 
coming along in good shape and it 
would not be at all surprising if some 
of the members were drafted for the 
varsity when the second semester 
opens. Mansell, Harding, Chisbolm 
and Willis are showing up well in the 
forward line, while Ross and Poole 
seem to be stars at the defensive 
game. fjuiinhy is the leading candi- 
date for the goal position at the 
present time and he seems likely to 
develop into a second Buttrick. 

COUNTY RELAY RACES 

The first of the County relay races 
will start this week Wednesday. 
The favor that these races met with 
last year, when Hampshire county 
finally won out, was so great that 
the management did not hesitate to 
schedule them again this year. 
Medals of some sort will probably 
be given to the winners. The sched- 
ule for this week is as follows : 

W I I.NIv-I.W ..li\. IS, 

Barnstable w Plj meuth. 

I.. i k-iiirc ra. Mas Jeraej , 
llriotol \h. Niw York, 
rniinerliruf ra. Mnffnlk. 
I teas rs. Middlesex. 
Franklin vs, Norfolk. 
Hampden \«, Hampshire. 
Worcester ra. World YVi.l. 

Fbioay, Jas. 14, 
licrkuhirc vn. Worcester. 
Bristol VS. Suffolk, 
Ooanaetlent vs. Norfolk. 
Franklin vs. New ,fen»ev. 



LOWER CLASSES COME OUT 
WINNERS IN OPENING GAMES 

Freshmen Defeat Seniors, and Sopho- 

morea Best the Juniors in First of 

Interclass Basketball Series. 

In the first of the inter-class basket- 
ball series in the Drill hall Friday 
night, the freshmen defeated the 
seniors 19 to 13, and the sophomores 
came out victorious over the juniors, 
25-15 Neither game showed any- 
thing spectacular iu the way of fast 
basketball, though the passing in the 
senior-freshman game was very good. 
Leslie Mann of .Springfield, coach of 
the Amherst college vaisity, refereed, 
and gave perfect satisfaction. He 
has been secured to officiate at aU the 
games of the series, 

1919, 19 1 1916, 18. 

For the first game in which they 
worked together the freshmen showed 
remarkable team woik. Besides 
passwork that was fast ami accurate, 
Uieir defense, especially in uic second 
half, was good. Fouls were frequent, 
however, and cost the freshmen many 
points, particularly in the opening 
period, which ended 8-5 in favor of 
the seniors. In the second half the\ 
came back strong ami soon overcame 
the lead. Perry's seveu goals from 
fouls were the features of I916's 
play, while the work of Pond and 
Crowe did much toward a freshman 
victory, Williams, after playing a 
hard game for 1919, was taken out 
because of the four personal fouls 
rule, and Whittle substituted. 

IM8, 2V !«»17, 15. 

The second game was featured by 
lack of team work on the part of the 
juniors, whom the fast sophomore 

[Continued on pa«a*] 



HOCKEY GAME CANCELED 

Poor Ice Conditions Prevent Satur- 
day Game With R. P. I. 

The ho.ky game with H. P. I. 
scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 8, was 
canceled by Manager Huntington, 
because of lack of good ice in the 
rink. Though the new rink being 
built on the old Bald had been flooded 
several times, not enough . water re- 
mained in il to provide a good sur- 
face when it froze. 

Cornell, which was scheduled for 
.Ian. Id, has also been cancelled, 
giving lack of funds for the guaran- 
tee as the reason. Negotiations are 
now under way with Trinity in re- 
gard to this open date. 





No. M 




FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 1916 


Oct. 7. 


Conn. Agn. College, at 




Amherst 


Oct. 14. 


Dartmouth, at Hanover 


Oct. 31. 


Harvard, at Cambridge 


Oct. 38. 


W. P. I., at Amherst 


Nov. 4. 


Tufts, at Hedford 


Nov. 11. 


Williams, at Williams- 




town 


Nov. 18. 


Cornell, at Ithaea 


Nov. 95. 


Springfield Y. M. C. A. 




College, at Springfield 



FOOTBALL TEAM SCHEDULED 
TO PLAY CORNELL IN 1916 

Manager Holden Announces List of 

Eight Oames, Including Harvard. 

C. A. C. to Open Season Oct. 7. 

The 1916 football schedule, re- 
cently announced, appears to be one 
of the hardest that an M. A. C. team 
has undertaken. Next year's team 
will meet three of the strongest col- 
leges iu the Fast when they line up 
i "uust Dartmouth, Harvard and 
Cornell. The schedule opens one 
week later than waa the case this 
vear, due to the fact that the college 
will not open until late in September. 
It closes with a final game at Spring- 
field which will also be the final game 
for that college. 

The first game of the season will 
be against Connecticut Aggie on 
Alumni Field. This game was sched- 
uled to give the team an easy con- 
test for the opening of the season in- 
stead of meeting the heavy Dart- 
mouth team. The Green will be the 
second opponent and will be played 
at Hanover and on the following 
Saturday the team will Journey to 
Cambridge to meet the Harvard 
eleven, A home game had been 
originally scheduled for this date but 
the other team claimed a misunder- 
standing and the Harvard game w:m 
scheduled instead. On October M 
Worcester Tech will be nt Alumm 
Field and on Nov. 4, Tufts will be 
played on the Med ford oval. Wil- 
liams has the nest date at Williams- 
town and the team will go to Ithaca 
on the nest Saturday to meet the 
Cornell warriors. The final game of 
the season will be on Nov, 2o at 
Springfield. 

Colby, Middlebury, and Holy 
Cross have been left off the schedule 
for various reasons, largely because 
the managements could not connect 
with right dates and Connecticut 
Aggies, Williams and Cornell have 
taken their places. The only thing 







The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 11, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 11, 1916. 



about the schedule seems to meet 
with criticism is the fact that the 
Cornell game comes just before the 
big game with Springfield. Accord- 
ing to the management this could not 
well be averted and the former game 
looked very good from several points 
of view. Only those who have tried 
It know the difficulties of schedule 
making and the management worked 
hard to get a good one. There is 
a possibility that the 1917 Tufts game 
will be played here in Amherst with 
the games alternating after that year. 
This would surely arouse interest 
among the student body and the 
alumni for it would mean a really big 
home game. 

Of course the outlook for next 
year can not be predicted. There 
are too many factors in the way of 
eligibility, development and coaching 
that enter into the problem of out- 
lining a team but generally speaking 
the outlook is good. The 11)16 men 
will be missed, for they were main- 
stays on this yeaiB eleven but other 
men are ready to step into shoes left 
vacant and fight for another winning 
Aggie team. 



NOTED ALUMNUS DEAD 

[( .iiitiiui«-il from itfuje 1] 



the Bowker Insecticide Company, a 
director of the American Agricul- 
tural Cbemical Company, with which 
his firm later became affiliated, a di- 
rector of a number of water compa- 
nies located in uifferent parts of the 
country, and a member of the Uni- 
versity, Exchange and St. Botolph 
clubs of Boston. 

THIRTY-ONE YKAKS AS TKUSTEK. 

Mr. Bowker continued his interest 
in his alma mater and was appoiuted 
a trustee in L886 and served unbrok- 
enly for a period of 31 consecutive 
years, he being in point of service 
the oldest trustee ever associated 
with the college. He was also a 
member of the board of control of 
the Massachusetts State Agricultural 
Kxperimeut Station during the years 
1892, 1893 and 1894. 

He suggested the plan of organiz- 
ing the board of trustees into com- 
mittees thus greatly facilitating its 
work. He was chairman of the com' 
mittee on buildings and grounds and 
a member of the committee on 
course of study and faculty. He had 
also served on the experiment sta- 
tion and finance committees. He 
assisted in selecting the sites of 
Clark Hall, the Entomology build- 
ing, Wilder Hall. French Hall, the 
Grinnell Arena, Flint Laboratory, 
Stockbridge Hall, and often remarked 
that he hoped to live long enough to 
witness the erection of a chemistry 
laboratory and a new library. 

Many able men have given freely 
of their time to the college, but it 
can safely be said that the time, 
energy and thought given to the in- 
stitution by Mr, Bowker exceeded 
that of other individuals. In fact, 
hi* whole soul waa wrapped up in 



the success of the institution. He 
gave enployment to a large numher 
of its graduates, and was present at 
every Commencement, remaining to 
the end, and was also on hand to 
take part in the gatherings held at 
the college during the academic year. 

He gave many public addresses at 
the institution, including the follow- 
ing: 

A Tribute to Levi Stockbridge at 
Memorial Exercises, Jan. 15, 1904. 

The Old Guard ; the famous Fac- 
ulty of Four, etc., at the fortieth 
Anniversary of the college, Oct. 2, 

1907. 

Address at dedication of French 
Hall, March 12, 1909. 

Address at acceptance of Goess- 
mann portrait, June 21, 1910, and of 
Stockbridge portrait, June 17, 1913. 

Address at dedication of Grinnell 
Arena, March 13, 1912. 

His last public address was de- 
livered at the dedication of Stock- 
bridge Hall, Oct. 29, 1915. 

AN AUTHORITY ON ■■■III HUM 

Mr. Bowker was a recognized au- 
thority on the manufacture of ferti- 
lizers and on the fertilizer industry, 
and he, together with Goeasman 
and Stockbridge, was instrumental 
in seeming the passage of the first 
fertilizer law in Massachusetts 
(1873). He wrote many pamphlets 
and delivered many addresses on 
the subject of fertility, including 

those entitled, " Plant Food, Fhe 

Harvest of the Sea," "Problems of 
Fertility in the Middle West," 
"Homeopathy in Agriculture" and 
"The Relation of the Fertilizer In- 
dustry to the Agricultural and Indus- 
trial Development of the Country," 
the latter being delivered before the 
National Fertilizer Association at 
Hot Spriugs, Va., July 19, 1915. 

Mr. Bowker was a wide reader, 
not only on subjects connected with 
his profession, but also in political 
economy and polite literature. He 
was a man with constructive ideas, a 
hunl worker, and of great energy 
and determination ; in fact, what has 
often been determined "a fighter." 
He frequently gave hard blows in 
his efforts to impress his ideas upon 
others, and was willing to receive 
like ones in return. He always ap- 
preciated a man who had the courage 
to combat him in argument, especial- 
ly, as he expressed it, "if he fights 
in the open." On the college board 
of trustees he often found himself in 
disagreement with the other mem- 
bers, and after heated arguments, his 
propositions were sometimes voted 
down. He generally took his de- 
feats with good grace and was ready 
in the future with new ideas for con- 
sideration. 

He was a strong supporter of Pres- 
ident Butterfleld and rejoiced to §## 
the college gaining in numbers, repu- 
tation and public eateem, The few 
remaining older members of the fac- 
ulty will miss his rugged thought, his 
energy and his frequent emphatic 
suggestions. In his passing, the 



agriculture of the state and country 
and our own beloved institution has 

* 

suffered an irreparable loss. j. b. l. 



GOD'S WORK IN THE WORLD 
THEME OF SUNDAY SPEAKER 

Rev. Hubert 0. Herring Sounds Note 

of Faith In Chapel 

AddreBs. 

Dr. Hubert C. Herring of Boston 
gave a very interesting address at 
Sunday Chapel, taking as his text 
the sayingof a f amyous group of men 
who lived in the time of the prophets. 
"The Lord will not do good and he 
will not do evil." In developing this 
test Dr. Herring pointed out the 
fallacy of this point of view. He 
showed clearly that their ideas were 
quite the contrary of the correct 
opinion, foi God is ever working 
good among his peoples. 

POULTRY STUDENTS 

TO HOLD EXHIBIT 



Dressed Poultry Will Be Shown In 
Stockbridge Hall Jan. 21-22. 

The first exhibition of dressed mar- 
ket poultry will be held in Stock- 
bridge Hall and managed by the stu- 
dents majoring in poultry, with the 
cooperation of the poultry depart- 
ment. The officers of the M. A. 
C. Dressed Poultry Show are : 
President, William B. Ryan 'IB; sec- 
retary, Roswell W. Henniger'17; 
treasurer, Harold N. Caldwell '16; 
premiums, Harold T. Whitney '16; 
superintendent, Alfred E.Topham *16. 
The doors will be open Jan. 21 
from 1 to 10 p. m. ami on Jan. 22 
from 10 a. m. to 4 v. M. On the 
afternoon of the second day an auc- 
tion sale will be held. 

This is a type of show that will 
take its place as a valuable ami per- 
manent asset in the business life of 
farmers, commercial poultry raisers, 
butchers, and produce dealers. Be- 
side* this bov«' and girls' clubs will 
act as a medium for the transmitting 
to the rising generation the problems 
offered by the market poultry and 
their solution ; also students of agri- 
cultural colleges will be brought 
closer in touch with the business 
world and its methods. 

It is the first effort ever made to 
do for market poultry what Boston, 
Madison Square Garden, Chicago 
and other places have done for staml- 
ard-bred poultry, and what the egg 
contests at Connecticut, and else- 
where have done for the egg produc- 
ing phase of poultry industry. 

Exhibits are to be divided into 
five primary classes, A, 11. (', D, 
and B, according to the occupation 
of the exhibitor. All of these ciaaaes 
will be eligible to compete for the 
Grand Sweepstakes prize. Several 
atate agricultural colleges of New 
England and the Middle Atlantic 
states will send exhibits, and a num- 
ber of boys* and girl*' poultry eluba 
have entered exhibits in the show. 



Through the generosity of sevei d 
dealers, poultryraen, and other int. - 
ested parties special premiums n e 
offered. The American Buff Wyan. 
dote club offers a silver cup for tue 
best display of Buff Wyandott 9, 
The American Poultry A<lvo<-ate off i->-* 
10 yearly subscriptions to be divided 
among the winners of class C (farm- 
ers and commercial men) iu the breed 
classification. Other premiums to 
the remaining classes are offered sm-li 
as subscriptions, settings of eggs, 
books, a No. 7 Mann Bone Cutter, 
etc., and a silver cup is offered l>\ 
Professor Morton for the best pair of 
birds in class A exhibited by a boy 
or girl. The progam is as follows: 
Pmbai , Jar. 21. 

HAH) A. M. -Judging "I exhibits. 
1-tH) r. m. -The first Annual P ra i sed 
Market Poultry Show <>|>en ii. 

imbue. Admission free. 

7-:$0 r. m. Illustrated lecture by tlw 

judtfe. 
8-1*. v. m. Demonstration in killing ami 

ploking; Alfred <». Luaa, 

extension instructor in l'oul 
try Husbandry, M. A. «'. 
8-45 r. M.— Demonstration in tn»*in| 

and boning; Loyal V> Payne, 

instructor in Poultry Hu- 
lun dry. M. A. 0. 
S vit iii> v> , .1 vn. '2il. 
HH) \, M. -Open to public. 
•2-W r. m Student*' dry picking I 

tenl for the •'Mullen Tropin 
:;-(»o r. m,— Auction sale of exhibits. 

It is difficult for an institution or 
an individual to initiate a new move- 
ment and not exaggerate the proba- 
bilities of Its development and in- 
fluence, yet this market poultry show, 
the fiist in all the land is bound to 
wield a mighty influence as the fore- 
runner of a new and momentous trend 
in the poultry world of today. 



GLEE CLUB CONCERT 

AT HADLEY FRIDAY 

Spacial Car Will Accomodate Student* 
Who Wish To Go. 
Kriday evening, Jan. 14, at 8-H(t 
r. m., the combined musical cluhi of 
the college will give a concert at the 
Iladley Town Hall. The concert. 
which is under the auspieea of Hop- 
kins Academy, will laal until '.»:•" 
Dancing will then be enjoyed until 
1*2. To accommodate any Aggw 
meu who wish to attend, the msnage- 
incut has made arrangements fori 
special trolley car to leave Hadle\ fl* 
Amherst at "l2-i:». The same -««• 
gram will be offend aa that on the 
successful musical trip during Cbrwt* 
, ,.as vacation. The concert will if" 
ford an excellent opportunity for the 
men who were unable to take in <> 
entertainments at that time to M^ 
the program which met with so 
■uccesa around Hoston. Fen 
will be selections by the orelir « 
Mandolin and (llee Club*, the «-••"* 
tet, and solos by Worthley '>* 
Tickets may be obtained from W 
shires *18- The price of adnm "J" 
including concert and danci rt 
| twenty-five cents. 



One week from Friday night the 

uubitied musical clubs will give a 

..ncert in Holyoke, under the aus- 

i-cs of the Athletic Association of 

ie Holyoke High School. 



PROFESSOR PHELAN AT 

WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 



Says Rural Life Offers One Of The 

Best Opportunities For College 

Men. 

Professor John I'helan of the De- 
partment of Rural .Sociology spoke in 
Wednesday's assembly on the influ- 
ence of college men and women in the 
ran] welfare. 

"We are surprised," he said, "that 
an obscuK force should come to the 
front to help solve a national problem, 
just as the overlooked lumber jacks 
in the time of the Civil War suddenly 
drew attention to their existence by 
freeing a fleet trapped in the lied 
River. 

"We see now it is the force operated 
hv men and women from agricultural 
colleges especially who are to uphold 
the part of agriculture anil country 
life. One of the fundamentals behind 
this force is the inspiration derived 
from the college, the unselfish spirit 
of science. It is this spirit which 
sustains the worker against the time- 
worn, traditional, narrow ideas which 
lie must combat. We all must have 
tin- courage of our convictions and 
Mill keep away from the rut. the one 
idea, sole aim, ami object of life. 
The more technical knowledge we at- 
t:iin in preparation the better, but 
knowledge is relative in value 

•We all wish to live a useful. happy 
life; technical knowledge bean 
directly on this end. A common 
fallacy is the belief that when a man 
is put in the bent circumstances the 
iitails of life will naturally follow, 
iti'teiidof believing that a man should 
wort up through the details of life 
into the best- Thf. rural life offers 
tlie college man his greatest oppor- 
tunities. All the states are awaking 
to the importance of rural welfare and 
each vies with the other in raising the 
>' a in lard of its country life above 
that of the neighboring states." 



ACME TIED FOR FIRST 

HONORS AT NEW YORK 

Piiltry Judging Team Equals Work 

of Cornell at Madison 

Square Show. 

M. A. C. shared first booon with 
1 in II in the first annual poultry 

mg contest held at the Madison 
fi re Garden Poultry Show on Jan- 
first. Four teams competed, 

ell. New Jersey and Connecticut 
I ics and Maiaacnoaatta. M. A. 
f with the best balanced team en- 
ti i. placed as follows; A. E. 
I uu, seeon ; W. E. Ryan fifth ; 
M II. W. Henniger seventh. In 
"i of the fact that the other three 

uling colleges in the poultry 

1, their work did not prove 



superior to that of M A. C. 

l'laus «re now being formulated to 
continue this contest as an annual 
affair, with the place of meeting 
changed yearly, one year being in 
New York, the next iu Boston, and 
the following in Chicago. Several 
other colleges are expected to partici- 
pate next year. 

In the future the event will include 
the utility side of poultry raising, the 
judging of eggs, egg production, 
market and dressed poultry, as well 
the judging of fancy stock. The 
committee in charge of this move- 
ment is made up of the following 
men : Professor Bice of Cornell, Pro- 
fessor Lewis of New Jersey, Profes- 
sor Kirkpatiick of Connecticut, and 
Professor Graham ind Mr. Payne of 
M. A. C. 

The contest showed Aggie in a new 
branch of activity at the leading 
poultry show of the United States in 
which each year thousands of people 
show great intereat. 



TRIBUTE TO LEAVENS 

The following editorial from the 
Rural Ntt Yorktr concerns an hon- 
ored alumnus of M. A. C. : 

During the paat year death has 
tout bed many dear and loyal friends 
who had become a part of business 
and social life. The latest one that 
has passed off into the shadow is 
(icorge D. Leavens, president of the 
Coe-Moi timer < ompany. Through 
many years of intimate association 
we hail come to know (Jeorge Lea\ ens 
as a bip, strong, tine, tender-hcai led 
man; the soul of business honor. 
white as the MOW in character, sound 
as a rock in loyalty and friendship, 
and with a deep, kindly sympathy for 
all who needed his help. He hated 
humbug and sham, and he loved 
honestv and sinceritv. We alwavs 
knew just exactlv where to find 
( icorge Leavens, and we always knew 
that his advice and council needed 
no Investigation or question. This 
big, strong, faithful friend lived bis 
life well. The world is better be- 
cause be baa lived in it, and life 
would seem a little darker now that 
he baa gone were it not for the hope 
and brigetneaa which such lives leave 
behind them. He has passed OB into 
the unseen country, but his memory 
will ever live with us like a beautiful 
picture of a dear friend. 



CERCLE FRANCAIS 

A very important meeting of "Le 
Cercle Francala" will be held in 
French Hall on Wednesday evening, 
Jan. 12, at 6 r. N. All those inter- 
ested in passing Final examination* 
in French, Spanish or German should 
come out to the meeting and hear 
Prof MacKimmie talk on * 4 The Dm 
of Language in Final Examinations. 
This information, although valuable 
for all, is especially so for freshmen 
who would greatly profit by hearing 
the lecture. Everyone is cordially 
Invited and urged to be present. 



COMMITTEE ANNOUNCED 

FOR ROBINS CAMPAIGN 



Will Plan for Meetings Conducted by 

Famous Chicago Social Worker, 

February 14-16. 

At a meeting held at the Beta 
Kappa Phi house Sunday afternoon 
L. D. Kelsey '17, chairman of the 
Robins Campaign Committee, an- 
nounced the following appointments : 
H. A. Mostrom '16, group leader- 
ship; R. W. Smith '17, program; 
s. S. Clark '18, continuation work ; 
R. W. Rogers '17, advertising ; U. O. 
Merrill '17, in charge of short course 
men. 

Thursday evening at 6.30 in the 
chapel there will be a meeting of all 
men interested for the consideration 
of ways and means of preparation 
for the campaign. 

Prominent alumni members of the 
different fraternities have expressed 
a desiie to come back and take part 
in this movement, which will be an 
entirely different kind of campaign 
than the Hurrey Campaign of last 
year. Raymond Robins will present 
his subject in a way that is sure to 
appeal to the men of M. A. C. His 
first public meeting will be on Mon- 
day, Feb. 14, and those who hear 
him then will not fail to attend the 
rest of the campaign. 



*09.— Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Whitney 
announce the birth of a son, Roger, at 
Reading, M 



The Freshman basketball team has 
gone to the training table. The 
squad is composed of Baker, Batchel- 
der, Blanchard, King, Macarthy, 
1'aik hurst. Pond, Williams, Wood 
and Chisholm, mauager. 

An Especially Oood Commission Proposition- 
Cash for test orders— Article widely Advertised— 
Cuts down expense in power plants— Address 
t' Ni.isi -i-.kini. Surety Co., i»VS N. 9th Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

(obbersof Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
tnd Fittings (or Steam, Water and Gas. Asbestos 
and Magnesia [toiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Kngins 
Connections. - « Holyoke, Mass. 



mci KMAWS 

Candies and Ice Cream 



** IIAMP" 



ii 



BIDE-A-WEE 



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Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

(Mo Specialty —And other good. 'things to eat. 

MRS. L- M. STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. 

Ttl. 4is-W 



DR. R. C. 

Dentist 
nasms BLOCK 

Evenings by Appointment. 

Bote, Ularrcn 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T. .1 AHERN, MANACCS 



T\ J O ' are supplied every year 

DurDcc s deeds direct to mon ; Amcri - 

i can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive B ui pee * a 
Annual for 1914,— a bright new hook of 182 pages, vvhich 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE k CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 



Potce'« Shoe .Stoi?© 

Largest Stock — Lowest Prices 



Ivxpert Repnirl 



Beat lenther n .*»«-< i 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 5* Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Maaa. 



Main Orrrcz: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the beat skilled 
artists and moat complete 

equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



-DKALKRS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. U, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 11, 1916. 



TBE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Student* <>f the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

TYI.KIt 8. lUMJKKH '16, Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD W. SMITH '17, Managing editor 

FKANK 3, SCfiEl'KKI.K '16. Assistant BdltOT 
THOH. L. HARRUCKB'lfl, Athletic Editor 

ALFRED A, UIOUMSA *1«, Athletic Editor 

DWIGHT F. BAHNKS Hi. Alumni Editor 

MiLFORD R. UWUKSCE '17. News Editor 
ELLIOT HENDKHSON '17, Df|»rtnient Editor 
WILLIAM SAVILI.E. . III. '17. < n in pun E<iltor 
MARSHALL O. LAM'HEAU MS, Asso'e Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

CHA8. A. HUNTINI !T< >N . .1 II. MB, 

IstiHineMi Manager 

MERRILL T. WARNER 17. 

Assistant Business Manager 

LESTER K. FIELIUN<i 1«. 

Advertising Manager 
JAMES C. TOW ELL TS. Circulation 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 6 cents. Make all <>nU<rs paya- 
ble to Charles A. Hi vnsi.roN, Jr. 



Entered aa second -<• lass matter at the Auiherat 
Post Office. 

Vol. XXVI. Tuesday, Jan. 11. No. 14 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
A new system of final examina- 
tions has been established by the 
faculty to take place tins semester. 
The object of making the change was 
primarily, we suppose, to make the 
examinations less of a strain on the 
students, and, by other previous ac- 
tions of the faculty, to lay less stress 
on them in the final marking in a 
course. The plan as finally an- 
nounced is plainly an experiment, 
for the two lower classes are being 
given an entirely different schedule 
from that of the Seniors and Juniors. 
The question has arisen in the minds 
of many of the students and some of 
the fatuity as to whether the new 
schedule will uot work mote hardship 
than the the old. 

The plan is In two parts. The 
lower classes, it is understood, will 
l>e given a week devoted to two hour 
examinations. The upper classes, 
however, will have classes as usual 
to the end of the semester, but dur- 
ing the last week may receive one 
hour finals any time during the reg- 
ular lecture or recitation periods, 
there being no attempt made to 
schedule the examinations or to pro- 
vide for finals. 

To many uppcrrlasamcn this 
means that they will receive several 
final examinations on the same day, 
some will have several in succession. 
No provision is made for time for the 
student to put any time on the re- 
view of his course except that which 
he regularly has during vacant hours 
and in the evenings. lie moat at- 
tend his regular classes, prepare 
work (or them, and at the same time 
prepare himself for the big test of 
the temester. Whatever the sys- 
temof examination thai may exist, 
the hardest part seldom or never 
comes during the test period, hut ii 
•pent by the students tn preparing 
for the great unknown, the examin- 
ation questions. Hours of review 



are always spent in this work, more 
hours of worry are often spent, and 
whether the test itself occupies ore 
hour or four, does not lessen the 
amount of time required to com- 
pletely review the semester's work. 
It is the preparation, then, and uot 
the examination itself, that wears 
the students out, and that makes the 
final examination period the most 
dreaded of ihe year. 

Undoubtedly the exponents of the 
new plan will say that with the 
shorter examination a less thorough 
preparation is needed, or that the 
good student should not have to re- 
view his work if he has done it prop- 
erly throughout the year. In answer 
to the first we would call attention to 
the way different members of the 
faculty are actually interpreting the 
plan. In one case, where the exam- 
ination questions have always been 
announced some time before the end 
of the semester, precisely the same 
questions have been assigned this 
year as any other, meaning that just 
as much work must be done in prep- 
aration, In another instance, the 
professor has taken the stand that if 
he cannot give one long examination 
he will get around it by giving three 
one hour tests, requiring as much 
preparation as one three hour test did 
formerly. Another, feeling that one 
hour was uot enough, has assigned 
to the class a goodly amount of out- 
side work to be completed and 
handed in as a part of the final ex- 
amination. These few instances, 
taken at random, from the experi- 
ence of one person, are cited only to 
show that the faculty are not basing 
their examinations on the idea of a 
shorter, simpler test, but seem to be 
evading the supposed object of the 
new scheme and are requiring just as 
much preparation as under the old 
system. It is this preparation, we 
repeat, that works the greatest stiain. 
The second defence suggested, that 
no preparation is ueeded if the work 
has been properly done throughout 
the year is theoretically excellent. 
We ask, however, how many learned 
men or public speakers, uo matter 
how well they understand the subject 
they are to talk about, can do their 
best in a speech of any great import- 
ance without a very considerable 
preparation before the occasion. 

Hence, it seems to us, the new 
plan, being loosely organized ami 
variously interpreted, will cause more 
dilliculties and work more hardships 
on the students than the other. We 
believe that to accomplish the appar- 
ent purpose of the faculty, the lessen- 
ing of the worry and strain of exam- 
ination week, the students should not 
be required to attend any clasess 
other than their examinations, and 
that these examinations be placed on 
a schedule ; in other words, revert to 
the old system, except make the 
tests shorter, and make them count 
not over one-half in the final rating. 



of the 1916 football schedule has 
brought forth expressions of approval 
and enthusiasm from all sides. 
Although harder than it was expected 
to be iu respect to the calibre of the 
teams to be played, it is well balanced 
and so arranged that the opening 
game does not come until the first 
week in October, a distinct advantage 
when it is recalled that college does 
not open until Sept. 26. Occasional 
"doubting Thomases" are found who 
fear that owing to the loss of so much 
vaisity material in this year's class 
the season next fall is predestined to 
be a dismal failure. Not so. A 
glance over the list of this year's 
second team and substitutes shows a 
goodly abundance of candidates foi 
all positions among the three under 
classes. And best of all these men 



JUST A FEW OF THE "TITLES" WHICH WE 

HAVE ON HAND TO SHOW YOU 

"WHEN YOU DROP IN" 

Lippincutt'B " Farm Manuals," 7 vols. 

First Principles of Agriculture, Vivian 

Principles of Soil Management. 

Lyon, Fippin. Bueknian 

The Potato, Frazer 

Forage Crops, Piper 

Brooks' Agriculture, 8 vols. 

Feeds and Feeding, Henry and Morrison 

Vegetable Gardening, Watts 

Farm Management, Warren 

Elements of Agriculture, Warren 

The Farm and Garden Kule Book. Bailey 

Manual of Fruit Insects. Dingerland and Crosby 

Milk and its Products. Wing 

And others. 



JOHNSON BOOK CO. 

85 Pleasant Street. 
R. A. Mooney H. W. Bishop 



WHIiiH WILL YOU BUY 

A "cream thief" or 
a " savings bank " 
Cream Separator 1 



A CREAM SEPARATOR IS used 
twice a day, 730 times a year, and if 
it wastes a little cream every time 
you use it it's a "cream thief", and 
an expensive machine even if you 
got it as a gift. ■ 

BUT IF IT SKIMS CLEAN TO 
the one or two hundredths of one 
per cent, as thousands and thou- 
sands of tests with a Hancock Tester 
show the Ue Laval does, then it's a 
cream saver, and the most profitable 
machine or implement on the farm 
—a real "savings bank" for ttt 
fortunate owner. 

THE MOST PROFITABLE ma- 
chine on the farm is a De Laval 
Cream Separator. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

in. Broadway New York 

2» K. Madison St., Chicago 



CJNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

REGULAR SUNDAY SKRVICK AT 7 P M. 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDEK 

Suits Cleaned, Pressed and Dyed. All kinds of 

Repairing for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly done. 

High-grade work hy first class tailor. Work 

called for and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing. 

4 suits rot fi.so 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, Prop. 

Main Street, Amherst, Mass. Nash Block 

On your way to the Post Office. Tel. 43*-W 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground white you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strinft 

AMHERST, MASS. 
Next to Post Office. 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 


10-15C 


Collars, 


2 I-JC 


Cuffs, ■ 


X 1 :< 


Plain wash, 


48c per dot. 


Same, rough dry. 


- 30c per dot. 



FLEMING'S SHOE S 



Northampton 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, J1.50 a Suit 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN * DYER, Props. 

Loose-Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
-Pens— 



• ■a iwn 



Manager Holdeu's announcement 



Stkpurn Lank Foloer 
UJknvTAorvnma jhwbl.br 

lao hroaoway, nmw york 

CSliVB AND OOrjlUKGK 
I'I.ns AND RINOS •» 

„„,.„. Ml 1 V KH AJTD IIHO.-*fcR miiArji 

S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

New at 13 PtesHit St, 
nrulists* Prescriptions pilled. Broken Lenses 
Accurately Replied. Fit* Watch Repairing 
Promptly and skilfully Done.^ 
Satisfaction Guaranteed 



R.T. PansT.Agent; D. Shbeihtar, Astt. Agent 
Try our ticket system — — 

Put full name and address on laund r> 

FLOWERS AND PUNTS 

Grown by the Florlcultural l>ept . 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums ami sweet 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 
Telepboaa 



WEBS' 



Everything in Photography 

GROUPS A SPfCIALTY 

Good work speaks for Itself. 

NASH BLOCK, MWBI. K» 



I i '.rides trained, and it goes with- 
er saying that this is a long step 
to ird success. Let us hope thtit 
« I n a final decision is reached in re* 
n i to the return of Dr. Brides, it 
«! be of tbe proper nature to allay 
ull fears of the doubters. 



CAN IT ISE DONE? 

Many suggestions in regard to stu- 
dent conduct at cupel and otber col- 
lege exercises have been made from 
time to time, both by President But- 
tei'ield and by ihe Senate, and 
although it seems strange that mat- 
ters of such a nature in a college are 
uot self-adjusting, yet there has been 
little sign of improvement. One who 
is at all observing cannot fail to notice 
the noise and the apparent laek of at- 
tention which greets every speaker 
whether a faculty man or a student, 
unless that speaker has some startling 
uiinoimcement to make. This is the 
season of the v#sf for nil colds, 
coughs, and wheezes, it must be ad- 
mitted, particularly if one has heard 
the incessant manifestations of these 
ailments during the chapel hours. 
Hut it is furthermore true that this 
can be suppressed- It is suppressed 
during the prayer, but tbe moment 
that is over and the speaker steps to 
the front to make any announcement 
the chorus begins again, evidently 
inspired hy the glee club's waivering 
attempt at an Amen in response to 
the previous praper. It is not impos- 
sible to maintain at least a dignilied 
quiet for five minutes when reverence 
demands it ; will not the application 
of a little care and respect for the 
speaker make it possible for fiftc. ■ 
minutes ? 



INFORMAL SATURDAY 

The fourth informal of the year 
will be held in the Drill Hall Satur- 
day afternoon, Jan. 15, st 3.30. 



\RMY OFFICERS TO 

ADDRESS CADETS 

Lieutenant Fleet Arranges Schedule 
Of Lectures In Military Science. 

Tin ough the activities of Lieuten- 
ant II. W. Fleet, a very interesting 
oottrae of lectures will be given dur- 
ing the winter months by the military 
department in connection with the 
course in Tactics. All lectures will 
be held in Stockbridge Hall at 3-10 p. 
«, <m Wednesday. There will he no 
regular Tactics classes during the 
*eek these lectures are held, but 
Junior, Sophomore and Freshman 
cltMes will be combined for these 
tolk- All cadets in the military de- 
part = . Dt are requested to take the 
sunt- seats as at assemblies. The 
['libit is Invited to attend. 

Ja 11. General C. H. Cole, Ad- 
jutat; Ueneral Mais. Volunteer Mili- 
ti». Will speak on the subject of "The 
Mili* " General Cole is considered 
"'«• the best Adjutants General 
4ti <• has ever had*, although a 
*'•< rat and appointed by Gov. 
^ : »l- his reappointment last month 



by Governor McCall has re- 
ceived the most general approval. 
To General Cole more than any 
other man is due the efficiency of the 
Massachusetts Militia. 

Jan. *2fi. Colonel K. F. Glenn, 
Genera] Staff, V. S. Army will speak 
on the "Military Policy of the IT. 8." 
Colonel Glenn is Chief of Staff to 
General Leonard Wood, command- 
ing the Depart incut of the Kast with 
station at Governors Island, N. Y. 

Feb. 9. Lieutenant Colonel W. 
W. Stover, nth Infantry Mass. Vol. 
unteer Militia will upeak on the 
"Militia Officers Training School." 
Through his efforts about forty non- 
commissioned officers, from regiments 
over the Btate went into camp last 
June with the West Point cadets. 
The school is a new feature of mili- 
tia training, and promices to be very 
valuable. 

March 15, Major II. II. Ilnnd- 
holtz, 80th Infantry. I'. S. Army, 
will speak on the suhject of "The 
Philippine Island Conslaluilarv." 
From 1913 to 1914 Major Itimdholtz 
was chief of the P. I. Constabulary 
with the rank of Brigadier (ieneral. 
His success in making from a disor- 
ganized and undisciplined police 
force one of the most efficient bodies 
of native troops in the world, was 
equal to the best work of Hiitish of- 
ficers in India and Egypt. For his 
officers General Handholtz went to 
land grant schools, and military col- 
leges, G. P. Nicholson, '11 and L. 
P. lirown '10 were appointed fiom 
M. A ('. 



CAMPION 



Fine Tailoring 



COLLEGE OUTFITTER 



Eeady-To-Wear Clothes 




F. A &HERARD 

MEN'S STORE 

Use Our New Cash Discount Card and Save five Per Cent 

— ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 

Come to us for 




THE AMATEUR DEFINED 

"An Amateur sportsman is OM 
who engages in s|K>rt solely for the 
pleasuic, physical, moral, mental 
and social benefits he derives there- 
from and to whom sport is nothing 
more than an avocation." So de- 
creed the meeting of representatives 
of nearly every big sports governing 
association of the Doited States and 
Canada at a recent conference held in 
New York. The proposals were 
framed by tbe Intercollegiate Asso* 
elation of Amateur Athletics of 
America, and with slight changes 
were ratified by the convention. 
Their object was to give a deflnation 
of tbe amateur which might lie uni- 
versally adopted and that would be 
acceptable to all lovers of pure ath- 
letics. A long but concise stare- 
ment of what debars a man from the 
ranks of • tbe amataur was also 
adopted and because of the broad 
representation at the convention it is 
expected these rules also will become 
standard. 

Professor Curry S, Hicks and Har- 
old M. Gore were present at this con- 
vention representing the college. 

Dartmouth will play Syracuse in 
football next year at Springfield on 
Nov 4 This will be the first appear- 
ance of of a Dartmouth football team 
in Springfield since their last game ' 
with Brown, held there in 1906. 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



FREE FRE 

For a few days only here's your chance to get 

FREE 

With a 90c Humidor of Tuxedo Tobacco, a 
GENUINE FRENCH BRIAR 

PIPE 

SEE THEM IN THE WINDOW 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store-On the Corner. 



PI 



- 



. % 

t 



m 



i 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 11, 1916. 



it 14 Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

75C Special Half Sole, Rubber 75c 

RBPAIRINO 
Black, Tan, White Work Guaranteed. 

PRICBS 

Rubber Soles •l.so 

Rubber Soles, with Heeli . . 01.7* 

Soles Sewed, ...••• 7ftc 

3* Shluei for Sl.OO 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours : o to it A, M„ 1-30 to 5 p. U. 



THE STORY OF 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone 59-R 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 
Windows, Lead Lights, &c. 

4 Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS. 



"UNDER COVER' 



NATIONAL DAIRY SHOW 

COMING TO SPRINGFIEL1 



HOW ABOUT A NEW SUIT ? 



Select it today. The new styles in Autumn and Winter patterns await 
your inspection. You will want a stylish, comfortable SUIT or OVER- 
COAT. Step in and examine our line. Style is the addition to the latest 
fashion, to your individual need. Custom cloihes are designed for YOU, 
not simply cut to fit the stocky sized man. Our Cents' Furnishings Line is of 

The Latest Goods in Shirts and Collars 

Kid Gloves, all styles New Dress Vests at very reasonable prices 



ALL KINDS Of RKPAlk WORK NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE 



DYEING 



ALTERING 



CLEANING 



PRESSING 



A Popular Melodrama With A Sur- 
prise. By Roi Cooper Megrue. 
A melodrama of crime nud its 
detection, of smuggled jewels and the 
forces of the law closing in upon the 
smuggler, of a girl driven to aid them 
against the promptings of her affec- 
tion, of alarms in the night, of 
whistles heard out under the shruo- 
bery, of lights switched on and off, 
and of revolvers fired in the dark — 
this is "Under cover." Thus far it 
is not strikingly different from the 
melodramas which in overflowing 
numbers have been invading the 
theatre. But "Under Cover" is 
something more. Above all, it is an 
ingeniously fashioned play, so con- 
structed that its most vigorous thrust 
comes in the form of a surprise which 
is withheld uutil the very last act is 
well under way. Its full force is felt 
at the moment wheu only too often at 
the theatre some members of the audi- 
ence are beginning to reach restlessly 
for their wraps. 

Roi Cooper Megrue, the author, 
has reached this by the device of 



LABROVITZ, 



Custom Tailor 



11 AMITY ST. 



WAR ANO POTASH 

War issittinn on the lid of the German I'otaih lUrrrl-Th.- Aim-nun Komcr has 
tow without it in 1916-Yet iq»6 will he the year of bi««t priers b» Macro*), 
and should be the year of biggest crops for hit benefit. What's ihe answer? 

The Potash Is In your Sell— Start it working ! 

Nitrogen and Phosphoric Acid will do St. They will produce plants sufficiently 
strong and vigorous to help themselves to the inactive Pm..,h now la<rnt in your soil. 






Hubbard's Bone Base Fertilisers 



W1 . ,, contain the nitrogen and phosphoric acid in right per- 
''T/f centagt-s for whatever crops you warn lo raise. 



: b::e. 




omcK 



THE ROGERS tt HUBBAKD COMPANY ,,-'K n ,, 



Huntington Ave, Exeter and Blagden Sts. t Boston, Mess. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

AMOS H. WMii'Pii .-.- 



C&rp<rvter & Morehoust, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Masa. 



Now is the time to be planning for 



Fraternity Groups 



-Have them taken at- 



keeping a secret from the audience 
It would be a fearful task to have to 
roimt all the paragraph** that must 
have been written in profound explan- 
ation of why this is something which 
playwrights must never, never do. 
When a playwright elects to play this 
I particular trick r,| ton his audience, he 
must see to it that however much mis- 
led and possibly mystified by events 
passing on the stage, the people out 
front shall be kept Interested in those 
events as they ■fleeted on* another 
and aa act HO C — ds act. In this Mr. 
Megrue is successful. 

The Story of "Under Cover" con- 
cerns a certain lovely necklace brought 
undeclared Into this port by one 
known to his acquaintances as Steven 
Denby. Necklace and all, he joins a 
■mall house party at the home of 
■one steamer friends on long Island. 
There the officers from the Customs 
House close in about him, guided from 
time to time by the girl f« whom 
Denby cares and who cares for Denby. 
The task is a bitter one for her, bol 
the ruthless deputy collector forces 
her to take it up by threatening to 
expose her younger sister for a crime 
half'innocently committed. 

The crash comes when Denby traps 
her in his room, to which she has 
come to And the necklace, and when 
all unconsc iously he gives the signal 
which was to hart been her sign that 
the customs authorities were to raid 
the boose. How a few moments later 
the tables are turned and Denby 
•scapes from the toils of the collector's 
office, that is the material of the last 
act, and that Is Mr. Hegrue's Utile 
secret. 



World's Greatest Pairy Exhibit Will 
Do Much for the State and College 
Through the efforts of Prof. W. P 
B. Lockwood, head of the dairy de 
partment, and 19 Springfield au«l 
Hampden county business men, the 
National Dairy Show will be brought 
to West Springfield for next year. 
The coming of this show promises 
much for the upbuilding of the daii v 
industry of the whole state and will 
have a very strong influence on the 
work of the college along these lines. 
About $200,000 must be raised within 
about a month in order to fulfill the 
terms of the contract, but the en- 
thusiasm so far shown indicates the 
ultimate success of the campaign. 

The show was secured for New 
England only after a great struggle 
because of the dilliculty in taking it 
away from Chicago. Great manu- 
facturing concerns have built in the 
exhibition space in that city perman- 
ent structures to accommodate their 
exhibits of mechanical equipment 
along dairy lines, the show receiving 
annually more thau $42,000 for rentals 
from these. The show has a mem- 
bership of over 75,000, and has at 
its head a general manager and a 
well organized executive force. Tin- 
attendance at the last show wsj 
365,000, and many of these are sun- 
to visit the college to inspect bs 
equipment while in the state. Tin- 
■how will be held for 10 day* in Oc- 
tober. Kansas City and Columbus*. 
Ohio, were the principal contestants 
against Springfield. 



NINETEEN-F1FTEEN NOTES 

Leon Damon left his job as herds- 
man a month or so ago, on account 
of ill health. Now be is at home, 
and is learning his fathers's business. 
Congratulations are doe "Glad" 
Csle, who married Miss Chapin -»f 
West Springfield, Dec. 18. Their 
home will be in Middleton. 

**Kippy" Goodwin is working os 
a landscape job in Greensboro, % 
C. Address care of Y. MCA, 

•Sid" Masse, bacteriologist for K. 
K. Squibb. New Brunswick, K. J. 

"SUn" Wright is in Worcester 
for the winter, and then expects to 
begin work in Northampton agnin 
in the spring. 

"Phil" Whitmore is working in tN 
dairy department during the short 
course, so for the next 10 week« ** m 
class notes, money or flowers to uim 
in Amherst. 



: t %\v 



44 State Street, 



McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 



Northampton, Mast 



At a meeeting of the 1918 track 
men, held last Thursday, I^ouis M. 
Lyons of Rockland was elected cap- 
tain of^the class track team. 




Philip Schwartz, a Princeton 
nate, who has just returned from *o 
extended stay in Russia, wh« b* 
has been engaged in Y, M. I 
work will address the college V M. 
C. st the meeting Thnrsdsy sv hd| 
at 6-30. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 11, 1916. 



BASKETBALL 

[continued from tmite 1] 

est!) kept on the jump from the start, 

h«>ugb at no time up to the last few 

ninutes did the 1918 men get far 

•.head to be sure of the game. Again 

a last year Vickers proved 1 baffler 

to the 1917 team, his diminutive size 

being an advantage to him rather 

than a handicap. Fouls played an 

important part in the scoring, the 

sophomores getting 7 out of 16 tries 

mil the juniors 7 on 14 shots. K. 

Grayson was chief scorer for the 

juniors while his brother, F. Grayson, 

who played opposite him, caged the 

greatest number of haskets for the 

sophomores. Sedgwick showed up 

well for 1918 on the defense. 

The line-ups : 

1910 ItlKI 

V F<; i- 1 11. r 

( rows, If, 2 4 rg, Moses, 1 t) 2 

I'.itklmrsl.rf, (I (l \ ii> Little, (I 

Pond, C, 4 :t 11 .-. IVrrv, 1 7 U 

M«( ■ i irthy,l>r, 2 (l 4 if, Kinu, 1 U 2 

Williams, rg, »> U It. Hall, (» 
Whittle, rg, U 



19 



1:1 



1910 UH7 

line 1 1 . 1 

Minor, If, 1 2 rt,', Hauelstein, 

\ IckSfS, If, 1 H It;, Mark, 

lollette, rf, If, iCorstroin, 

1 i;rayson,c, 4 l » e, K.Grayaon, 2 7 11 

Sedgwtek,1g, 1 4 rf, Squires, 1 2 

Basses, r^r, 1 2 if, Irving, 1 2 



■i:> ir» 

l,i tine - Mnnii of BptiagScld. Timer 
Professor Hick* of M. A, C. Nnrer — 

U oreti T7. Time-2l)-HiiiMiir halves. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB NOW 

MEETS ON WEDNESDAYS 

The officers of the Stockbridge club 
announce the change of time of their 
regular meetings. Hereafter they 
will be held Wednesday evenings at 
6--lf> in room 214 Stockbridge hall. 
Under this new schedule will come the 
lecture Wedndsday night. At that 
time Professor Clark, head of the M. 
A. C. forestry department, will give 
au interesting talk on the farm wood- 
lot. The lecture will he illustrated 
by lantern slides. The officers also 
wish to call the atteution of the. short 
course men to the work of the Stock- 
bridge cluh and urge their attendance 
at the meetings. The purpose of the 
cluli is to foster the interests of agri- 
culture in the college Interest- 
ing outside speakers, men such as 
Herbert Collnigwood, editor of the 
Rural Xeir Yurkir, and George A. 
Drew, manager of Conyei's Fruit 
Farm, address the cluh at the 
weekly meetings. Sometimes »tti- 
dents lecture before the club. Three 
excellent outside speakers, live wires 
on agricultural subjects are to come 
soon, and the cluh is in correspond- 
ence with several others. The club 
also supports the stock, poultry, and 
fruit judging teams. Here are oppor- 
tunities which short course men can- 
not afford to miss. 



time that the Faculty roll included 
several astute actors. The full ex- 
tent of this dramatic ability was 
never realized, however, until the 
recent tryouts for Manager Forbush's 
play. This play which will appear 
on the boards at the Social Union 
entertainment will present several 
stars of the first magnitude. Mana- 
ger Forbush asserts that his troop 
will make K. H. Sotheru and Julia 
Marlowe look like Bowery soubrettes 
oat of a job. 



LATEST ADDITIONS 

The following publications have 
recently been added to the College 
Library : 
American Journal of Anatomy, l-iu, 

1001 to (late. 

American Journal of Psychology, vols. 

15-2:1, IIMJ5-11HHJ. 
Anatomical Record, vols. 1-10. IIMHS to 

(late. 

Carmen Begtster, vols. 1-10, 1084-1849. 
Oppeabeimer: Bandbueh tier liio- 

rheiiiUi, 7 vols, 

Zeitsciilt fur mitersiiehiiny del- Nali 
rmiys iind tleimsmittel, vols. 1-15, 1S!*H- 
1900. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

■M Mr. and Mrs. Wallace House 

of Hanson, Mass., announce the mar- 
riage of their daughter Amber Ro- 
/flma to Louis M. Barker at Pelham, 
N II., June I2th, 1915 Mr. and 
Mrs. Barker were in Amherst for 
lonimencement for a part of their 
wedding trip. Present address, Scit- 
aate, Mass. 

My. — The marriage of Miss F.mily 
Russell |Q Harold Phelps took place 
in North Hadley November twenty- 
seventh. 

'It. — Miss Annie L. Potter and 
George E. Merkle were married on 
^"luesday, September eighteenth, 
lilS, at Kingston. R. I. 

nil. — J, B. Thomson on his recent 
tnp to California with the National 
Orange party spent an afternoon 
situ Dan Gary '06. Gary Is eon- 
Be. led with the University of Cali- 
fornia at Berkeley. 

*H. — K. C. Edwards — a baby girl, 
weight 8 1-2 pounds, arrived Thurs- 
dav. Jan. »;. 

I .— The engagement is announced 
"< M m Kdna M. Beman of West- 
Mass to Ralph Tower. Tower 
«» it. Lisbon, If. H. 



U, 



us for a new library building at 
C, are now being prepared by 
hitect, Mr. James II. Ritchie 
ton. It is highly probable that 
oming legislature will be asked 
impropriation for this purpose. 



PLANS WELL UNDER WAY 

FOR BIG FACULTY SHOW 

Prof. Waugh Says to Look Out for 

Something Really Startling on 
Evening of January 39. 

The date is set. On Jan. 99 in 
Stockbridge Hall dignity will be OSSI 
aside, the fountain of mirth will be 
connected up with the hydrant and 
the gods of laughter will play the 
hose. Kvery student who has not a 
condition at the present time must 
get in condition for a good laugh and 
a good time before the 2'Jth. There 
will be more real fun at that time than 
a student ever had in plugging up for 
ratd-years, What is it? Music, 
Electricity — Vtctrola Cohen himself 
on the Phone — A two-act force with 
dynamite under it. A colored per- 
son from ( hatlanooga, and two dark 
complexioiied gentlemen direct from 
the Georgia plantation. And this is 
only part of it. See these eolnrons 
next week for farther particulars. 

Bd Simpson says that there will be 
some some new VictroJe records on 
the market soon, all red seal, high 
grade stuff made by the artists in 
Professor Waugh *s symphony orches- 
tra, These records, however, will 
not he released from sale until after 
the Social Union concert. Professor 
Waugh says that picking an orchestra 
from the Faculty is like finding the 
cheese in LI m burg— you just follow 
your nose. As we all know, one 
member of the Faculty once played in 
the band and one on the Red Sox. 

It has been well known for a long 



OUR PRICES ON HIGH-GRADE SUITS 

AND OVERCOATS ARE ALWAYS 

THE LOWEST 

Now to reduce our stock for inventory we are offerino; our entire 

stock of 

Suits and Overcoats at a Reduction 
of 20% from the Regular Prices 

Thie stock is made up of Hart Sehaflner and Marx Clothes to- 
gether with other high-grade lines. 



Stock up on Shirts-Manhattan Shirt Sale 



$2.00 Shirts 
$1.50 Shirts 



Now $l.fi5 
Now $1.15 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



RELIABLE AGENTS WANTED 



-FOR- 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 



— Write for Particulai 
Lm;tl Agency Manager 



COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 

51 Cbarabera St., New York City. 






I 




8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 11, 1916. 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 



No«< located over post ollice. 



Up one Htght 



Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System Tel. 36-M 

T. MIGNTKA. 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday from 7.1*. On your way to V. O. 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner ol llillinan and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks Irom the Union Depot, is • modern hos- 
telry run on the European Plan. It is just * step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices St and up; rooms 
with bath (single) SI. SO and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Otters courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestiy 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swai'i 

Waterman's 



Thirty-six dozen pens to select f 



OUR RULE 



rom 



evening 



D. H. SIEVERS, 



Hi Kill »■•<! Mot- 1. 



s,.i intjli. 1,1. Mit«». 



sm HEUT HnHl 1 BBE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AMD 

CARPET ROOMS 

E. D. MARSH ESTATE 

Cox Sons & Vining 

7J Madison Ave., New York 

Caps 
Gowns 
floods 

for all Degrees 

ROUS FOR JUDICIARY, CLERGY AND CHOIR 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated oooklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFtELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 




Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

Al. A. C. Athletic Field Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, O, 

Tennis Association. 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

Niueteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

It. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
S. W. Hall, Piesideut 

EL L. Holdeu, Manager 
A. W. Spstulding, Manager 

D. A. Ricker, Manager 
. Huutiugton, Jr., Manager 

N. Moorhouse. Manager 

11. Aiken, President 

J. T. Nicholson, Manager 

F. A. Anderson, Manager 

L. E. Fieldiug, Manager 

F. W. Mayo, Manager 

K. L. Messenger, Manager 

A. J. Hicks, President 

E. L. King, President 

C. H. Gould, President 

R. F. Taber, President 



w 1 M Kin BOOK AGENTS. 

Both sexes, for best seller published. Particului I 

and outfit free. 
GKO. W. MJMKHs. 1-8, »»• Au*ustln*-, tU 

COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 



CARS 



Leave AOCilE COLLEOE for HOI- 
YOKE at 1 5 mln. put the hour. 



CARS 



Thera are SeTen i 10I R • non- *l»v voushould 
buy your 



COAL 



or 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

S7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mast. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Claud pnh tram r A. V to 4 A M 



C. R. ELDER 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 




RAHAR'S INN 

v.rtiimmpttHi, MssmrUuwtti 

wmaruMrum 



The Heat Ptac« to Dine 

IIDOI) root) PROPRRL? PRBPAHSD 

All Kind, of SM Food 

M-reiit Luncheon from II -SO MS p.m. 
Special D l.het at All Hour. 



R. J. RAHAR. Prop. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Uloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Mile* of Trackage - nodern 
Equipment — Train I U*pat th- 
ing; System - Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



Leave AMHERST lor AOOIE COL- 
LEOE at 7 and 11 mln . past the Boer, 



Special Car* at 



Rate* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. Rfl 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 



M 




For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

JACOB REED'S SONS, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

14*4-14*6 CtaeWmt St„ Philadelphia. Pa, 



CI«*ltalBK HT*Bll»« B*patrl"I 

...... k. -i WwIWi »••» Werfc.Loww« "HI 

All wotk cartful!? dene. Work ealM hj" 
delivered. GanU« overcoat*, suitt. part* «*| 
coats. Ladies' fine linen so»U a •P««* 1 «*. 
Team* will call every day at M. * <- 

Wl. rHJUlKLiy. t'^f 
Kear Nash Bl'k. Amherst. I 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Ci 

616 Chestnut «t.» PhUadelphu 

Jewelers and Silversmith* 

Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fntirilty Jen* 

S PKOl AU1STS IN 

Fraternity Badjet, Fofcs, *° v,1,rt | 
Rings, Charms...... Prises, Troj>^ 

Medals .College Has, F^», s < 

Rings, Charms .*. 





r \ > J -lb 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 18, 1916. 



No. 15 



PARLIAMENT MEMBER SPEAKS SOPHOMORES STILL LEAD (SOCIAL SERVICE IS MAIN 
ON ENGUSH LAND SYSTEM IN BASKETBALL SERIES IDEA OF ROBINS CAMPAIGN 



Hon. Francis Neilaon, M. P., Shows 

Its Relation to the Progress 

of Democracy. 

Francis Neilaon M. P., as the 
speaker in Wednesday Assembly, 
gave a most impressive address on 
"Democracy and its Relation to the 
Knglish Land System." Mr. Neilson 
who baa long been in Parliament has 
al irays been a strong leader in the 
fight for English democracy. 

In outlining democracy from the 
Knglish standpoint, he traced the his- 
tory of the land tenure By stem in 
Kngland from the early Saxon people. 
He said : There is no democracy that 
cannot begin with equal rights and 
equal opportunities. In the old 
Saxon days we And the highest 
development of English democracy. 
Then privileges came aud a gradual 
restriction followed which developed 
into the birth of a ruling party, 
hater a new way was found to take 
the common fields of Great Britain 
by the aristocracy through legislation. 
The grand magnificent robbery went 
on and democracy ebbed lower. 

'•since 1901," said Mr. Neilson, 
l, I have been working to upset the 
Knglish landlords and tin- epithets 
burled at me have been inspiring. 
One method has failed already, hut 
we tried another. Meetings were 
held all over England, Ireland, Wales 
ami Scotland to discuss the hud ques- 
tion until the country settled with it. 
Tiit* land values budget resulted and 

I continued 00 pace 6| 



DR. MADISON BUNKER 75 

DIES VERY SUDDENLY 

For 8everal Tears Connected with 
Bowker Fertilizer Oo. 

Dr. Madison Bunker '75 died sud- 
denly of heart failure at his home in 
WV«.t Newton vesterdav morning. 
l>i Hunker was associated with the 
ft ker Fertilizer company for a few 
1 immediately after his gradua- 
■• and then took np the study of 
'"■' inary medicine, establishing an 
ex- -llent practise around Newton. 
He followed this profession until the 
•m mobile era made it unprofitable 
isti igain became connected with the 
ft Ker company where he held re- 
■ponsible positions until bia death, 
w, Bunker was secretary of his 
tlar*rt.\ 



Defeat 1916 Team by Xargin of Two 

Points. Juniors Win fiom 

Freshmen, 29-23. 

Faster basketball and better team 
work characterized the second of the 
interclass series in the drill hall 
Friday night, when the Sophomores 
made it two straight by defeating the 
Seniors 18-16, and the Juniors van- 
quished the Freshmen five 29-23. 

1918, 18; 1916, 16 

In the first three minutes of the 
opening game V it-kern scored three 
points in succession on free tries, 
giving 19 IH a lead which the Seniors 
nevei overcame. Fast passing and 
agressive team work kept the hall in 
HMO's territory most of the time, 
though occasional spurts down the 
floor by Perry and Hall gave the 
Sophomores no opportunity to take 
things easy. The score at half time 
•rood 1 ' »; in favor of HUH. In the 
second half the Seniors came back 
strong aud for a time looked aa if 
tliey would take the game away. 
With the score 17-14 sgainst his 
team, Perry made a pretty shot from 
the center of the floor, but a foul 
goal by Vickers the next minute 

[Continued on pe«e . r > 



GIVES CONCEPTION OF 

OOD IN CHAPEL ADDRES8 

Rev. R. H. Potter of Hartford Says 

War ts Man's Doing, 

Not God's. 

Rev. Rockwell II Potter, pastor 
of the First Church of Christ, Hart- 
ford, Conn,, delivered the sermon in 
Sunday chapel. In part he said : 
" 1 am going to tell you something 
about God, First. He is a spirit 
and is here with you. He thinka, 
feels and wills with you. Second. 
He is light and in Him here is no 
darkness. Every man with a heart 
and sense has probahlv wondeied 
sometimes if there was a spot of 
darknees over the light of God. Rul 
there is no darkness in Him. The 
blackness comes from the lives of 
men. Third, God Hi love, — loves all 
men, always and everywhere. He 
loves you. Hold this thought close 
to your hearts. You will soon make 
an adventure. Make it on these tares 
truths ; then your life will be strong 
and fine. Try this out for yourself 
in the laboratory of your own life. 



Committee Announces Tentative Pro- 
gram for Meetings. Campaign to be 
Entirely a Student Enterprise, 

The third meeting of the Robins 
Campaign committee was held Sun- 
day afternoon at the Kappa Sigma 
house. About l.*» members of the 
committee attended aud took definite 
steps toward the organization of the 
series of meetings which are to be 
held by Raymond Robins Feb. 14- 
10, The program of the campaign 
has been outlined some what as follows : 

Monday, Feb. 14, 1-10 p. m., Mr. 
Rohins speaks in the auditorium, 
taking place of morning chapel. 
At 6-H0 p. m. second address by Mr, 
Rollins. 

Tuesday, Feb, 15, noon meeting 
in town hall, Amherst college stu- 
dents presiding. At 6-10 p. m., Mr. 
Robins at auditorium. 

Wednesday. Feb. 16, 1-10 p. «., 
m li ' .! menhir. Al I 98 

p. v, closing meeting, Stockbridge 
Hall. 

All the meetings held at M, A. C. 
will be presided over by men promi- 
nent in the student life of the col lege. 
The whole campaign is to lie strictly 
a students' affair and will lie of euch 
a nature as to command the interest 
of every man in college. 

The prime object which Mr, Robins 
is driving at in all Us campaigns 
among the colleges, and the demand 
for his services keeps him busy all 
the time, hi, "to harmonize tifework 
with mi.' Ghristisnity." Raymond 
Robins puts religion and social ser- 
vice up to the college man from the 
common seuse, business man's point 
of view, and in the words of Theodore 
Roosevelt, who is one of his staunch- 
eat supporters, •he carries with him 

< onllnoed en |«mr SI 



STUDENT COMMITTEE 

ON SCHOLARSHIP 

The college Senate has appointed 
the following committee of the stu- 
dent body to confer with the faculty 
committee in regard to bettering the 
conditions of scholarship at M . A ( . : 
Walter K. Dodge *1§, chairman, 
Thomas L. Harrocks, Benjamin C. 
L. Sander, Homer C. Darling, Henry 
M. Walker, and George N. Danforth 
all of 1016 1 and Wesley C. Bonn, 
Elliott Henderson, Frank W, Mayo, 
and Richard W. Smith, of the class 
of 1917. 



YALE WINS AT NEW HAVEN 
BY RALLY IN SECOND HALF 

Aggie Hockey Players Force Elis to 

Limit, Though Losing Game 

by 5-1 Score. 

Four goals in two minutes coming 
shortly after the beginning of the 
second period, spelled defeat for the 
varsity hocke\ team Wednesday night 
at New Haven. The first period 
ended in a tie 1 to 1, the final score 
being Yale A, M. A C. 1. 

Van Nostra ud stood out as the star 
for Yale, scoring four of the five 
goals- Although Buttrick made 
twenty-seven stops during the game, 
main of them dillicnlt.and six of them 
when he was the only man between 
the Yale player and the goal, he bad 
a slight lapse at the beginning of the 
second period. York, the Yale goal 
tend showed plenty of skill, knockiug 
down tweuty-iwo out of twenty-three 
shots. Few fouls were called and the 
game was characterised by rough 
playing throughout. 

The in si half started with a rash 
down the ice toward the Yale goal, 
where York was kept busy parrying 
shots. Twice Van Nostrand broke 
loose from the mix np, the second 
time scoring, time A;3J4. F01 the 
remaiuder of the period the playiug 
was about even, Ross and Plaisted 
breaking up the Yale ombinations as 
they came down the ice. Murray and 
Van Nostrand, Uie Yale defense men. 
played back toward their goal allow- 
ing the M, A, C. team little chance to 
get past for a clean shot, Toward 
the end of the period Fernald picked 
up the puck in a scrimmage near his 
own goal, and after carrying it tli< 
length of the ice, slipped it past Yoik 
for the only Aggie score. The period 
closed with the score tied, 1-1. 

The second period started off with 
a rush. Captain Chiahoim and 
Woolley made several dashes down 
the ice, hut no scores resulted. Then 
Plaisted was ordered from the ice for 
two minutes. Apparently no one 
dropped back into his position and 
before <he team realiied what had 
happened, Yale had scored four more 
goals. The latter part of Uie period, 
the Aggie forward hue made a des- 
perate effort to come back, but the 
Yale men fell back and played a 
defensive game, against which little 
could be done. 

Poor shooting and lack of condition 
were the chief fact on in the defeat, 
for at the beginning of the game tin 







The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 18, 1916. 



Aggie team liiul taken twelve Buots 
at the Yale goal before the Yale team 
got close enough to the Aggie net for 
a single drive. 

The prospects of the team look 
brighter than ever before. Plaisted 
and Ross, working together for the 
first time put up a good defense, while 
Captain Chisholm, Woolley, Fernald 
and Wildon worked well together in 
the forward line aud gave promise of 
things to come. 

The line-up and simimaiy : 
m. a- c. YAI.K. 

Bttttrick, g a, York 

Hoss, p I'. Washburn 

PlAlsted, op < P. Murray 

Fernald, o «', Van Kottrasd 

Chisholm, r r, Burgess 

Woolley, lw lw, Gould 

Wildon, rw rw, Wmour 

Seals Kirsl period, Van Must rami, 
4:4*: rVriuild, 18:04. Seeosd period, 
Van NoKtraml, 6:84; BargeSft, 5:80; Van 
Nnslraiul. 5:80; Van Nt.slraml, 8:08. 
SuliKlilulii.ns ||. A. C. Sanderson for 
Wildon, Valr Hierworlli for Armour, 

Bttehanaa tor Van fifoatrand. Panalttat 

— ('hislioliu :\ ininult's, Van Noslraml 
12 minutes, Washburn '2 minutes, Plalatod 

Smiontes. Eteferes Kr. Kinnon, Htm 

Haven llo.kev Club. impire Mi 
Ford. New Haven lloekey Olub. 'rime 

of halves— 90 ninutoa each. 



JUNIOR PROM PRELIMS 

ON SALE WEDNESDAY 

House Parties, Carbaret Concert and 

Unique Decorations Features of 

1017 Affair, Feb. 11-13. 



Plans for the decoration of the 
Drill Hall and the entertainment of 
the guests have been formulated, and 
the committee promises satisfaction 
to all. The orchestra will be the 
latest combination, including ban- 
joes, saxophone, base-viol, etc. ; and 
with a unique feature of the decora- 
ting scheme should combine to give 
an air of the very latest dance policy 
to the occasion. 

The prelims will be placed on sale 
Wednesday evening — and the com- 
mittee asks that only those seriously 
plauning to attend the Prom secure a 
prelim. Tickets will be placed on 
sale with the invitations about two 
weeks before the affair, and may be 
secured at the time from Treasurer 
Henderson at 7 South College. 

Several house-parties have been 
:u ranged and the indications point to 
an extraordinarily live time. The 
new system of exams should require 
an exceptional relaxation following 
them, that can only be Becured by 
attending the Prom. Seniors ! This 
is your last chance. Juniors ! This 
is your dance. Sophomores ! Add 
this to your Hop and make a com- 
plete year. Freshmen ! We want 
you to start right, and here is your 
chance. 



TRUSTEES OF COLLEGE 

HAVE ANNUAL MEETING 



Accept Several Resignations, Includ- 
ing That of Prof. S. B. Haskell. 



to represent the Trustees in negoti; - 
tion with representatives of otht r 
bodies interested to consider the 
question of improving hotel accom- 
modations at Amherst. 



The Massachusetts Cclle^kn, Tutscsy, Jen. 18, 1916. 



D. F. DAMON 10 TO BE 

EXTENSION PROFESSOR 



Following is the program of events 
scheduled for the Prom season this 
year : 

Friday afternoon, February 11 — 
Hockey (iauie : II. I. T. vs. M. 
A. C. 
Friday evening— The Prom. Concert 

at S-.S0. 
Saturday afternoon, 2-30— Glee Club 

Concert — Cabaret. 
Saturday afternoon 8-1. 5 — Hockey 
(lame— Dartmouth Freshmen vs. 
M. A. C. Freshmen. 
Saturday evening, H-l.'i— Prom Show : 
"luder Cover." 

The season will be terminated 
Sunday, when guests at house-par- 
ties will leave. There is a question 
before the faculty whether to per- 
mit un-chaperoned sleigh-rides; but, 
providing the weather is favourable, 
many will undoubtedly enjoy the 
pleasure of sleighing to Deerfield or 
Hadley on Saturday and Sunday. 

The new features of this year's 
Prom are scheduled for the Saturday 
afternoon. One is the staging of a 
Freshman hockey game — and Dart- 
mouth should make an added attrac- 
tion which ought to draw the interest 
of the sport-loving. The other is 
the Concert-Cabaret, which manager 
Anderson of the Musical Clubs is 
staging. It will be conducted in the 
Drill Hall somewhat on the plan of 
the performance in Marlborough this 
Christmas, and by combining the 
features of the ucujI Glee Club Con- 
cert and datisant, more time will be 
allowed to both. 



Will Take Place Left Vacant by Death 
of Professor Ferguson. 
The Extension Service and the De- 
partment of Agricultural Kcouomics 
is gratified to announce the appoint- 
ment of K. Faruham Damon '10, to 
take up the work of cooperative 
organization and marketing vacated 
by the death of Prof. K. H. Fergu- 
son,, Studeuts of an earlier day will 
remember the brilliant success of 
"Barney" Damon as business mana- 
ger of the Coixkge Signal when he 
paid its debts aud piled up an unbe- 
lieveable surplus. 

After leaving college Mr. Damon 
spent a year of strenuous graduate 
study in Agricultural Economic* at 
the University of Wiscousin, special- 
izing in cooperative organization 
among farmers. He was called to 
Colorado to take charge of a Fruit 
Growers' Union, in the fall of 11*11. 
lu 1912 he went to California to take 
up work with the citrus associations. 
Since that time he has been continu- 
ously in charge of the packing, hand- 
ling and marketing of oranges and 
the management of citrus fruit ex- 
changes. He is thoroughly familiar 
with practical methods of organizing 
farmers and with fruit marketing 
problems. At present he is manager 
of the Orange Citrus Exchange at 
Grunge, Cal., and informs us that he 
has had "all the other exchanges 
chasing him in orange prices" all the 
season. 

Mi. Damon isa Massachusetts man 
who knows Massachusetts' problems. 
We gladly welcome hirn back. He 
will take up his duties hereabout 
Feb. 5. 



The annual meeting of the True 
tees of the Massachusetts Agricul 
tural College was held in Boston Fri- 
day, Jan. 7, 1916. 

At this time Mr. E. Farnum 
Damon of Orange, Cal., waB elected 
to succeed Prof. R. H. Ferguson as 
Extension Professor of Agricultural 
Economics. Mr. Damon ib a native 
of Concord, Mass., and graduated 
from the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College in 1910. The following year 
he spent in graduate study in Eco- 
nomics at the University of Wiscon- 
sin. Subsequently he worked with 
various fruit growers' associations in 
Colorado, Oregon and California. 
For over a year Mr. Damon has been 
the very successful manager of a 
fruit growers' association in Orange 
County, California, where he has had 
charge of the marketing of the fruit 
of a large area. Mr. Damon is 
fitted both by training and experi- 
ence to carry on the work so well 
started by Prof. Ferguson during 
his two years' service at the college. 

Mr Frank C. Smith was elected 
to the position of Extension In- 
structor in Civic Improvement to fill 
the vacancy caused by the resigna- 
tion last August of M. P. H. El- 
wood. Mr. Smith is a graduate of 
the Milwaukee, Wis., State Normal 
School, and also of Cornell Univers- 
ity. He pursued graduate study in 
landscape gardening at Harvard Uni- 
versity, and for the past two and a 
half vears has been on the staff of 
the Department of Landscape Gar- 
dening at the University of Illinois. 
Mr. Elbert L. Arnold was elected 
to succeed Miss Mabel It. Chase, as 
first clerk in the Extension Service. 

The resignation was accepted of 
Prof. Sidney B Haskell, head of the 
Department of Agronomy. Prof. 
ilinkell has been connected with the 
institution since his graduation from 
it in 1904. When the Department 
of Agronomy was organized he was 
elected to the position of head of the 
department. Prof. Haskell is con- 
sidered to be one of the strongest 
teachers of Agronomy in the country, 
and his work at this institution has 
been eminently successful. Prof. 
Haskell leaves to enter ths employ- 
ment of the National Fertilizer Asso- 
ciation, where be will be employed 
as a field representative. 

Mr. George M. Hall, a graduate 
of the Agricultural College in 1915, 
was elected to succeed Miss Beryl H. 
Paige as assistant in Veterinary Sci- 
ence in the Experiment Station. 
Feb. 1 Miss Paige will go into col- 
lege work elsewhere. 

The Trustees appointed a commit- 
tee, consisting of Hon. Charles A. 
Gleason of Springfield, Mr. Nathan- 
iel I. Bowditch of Framingham and 
Mr. Edmund Mortimer of Grafton, 



FACULTY PLAYERS ARE 

IN DEMAND ABROAD 



Telegrams from London, Paris and 
Berlin all Bequest Engage- 
ments after Jan. 29. 

The following cablegrams speak 
for themselves. They show most 
clearly that The Faculty Players will 
not lack engagements after the tre- 
mendous opening at Stockbridge 
Hall, Jan. 29. 

Gaiett Theatkk, Loudon. 
Manager Forbush, Eso.., Ambebst. 
Things are in a bally bad way here 
in London on account of the 
war. People do not seem to care for 
the theater. However, we think if 
we could stage something of extra- 
ordinary merit we could make it go. 
Could you bring your company here 
immediately after the close of your 
engagement in Amherst, Jan. 2!t? 
What guarantee would you require? 
Mii»i>i.kuorne-Sblls, 

Resident Manager. 
Pakis, lb 15 Janvieb. 
M. ue Pkokessok Lockwoou, 

Theatre-Vaudeville, M. A. C 
Est-ce que ce serait possible pour 
vous et votre troupe celebre de faire 
une voyage a Paris pour donner des 
representations chez nous? A cause 
de la guerre nos affaires de Paris 
devenirons instautanement encore 
gaies en vous voyant. Cher Mon- 
sieur venez loute de suite. 
Flora llion, 

Le Moultn-Rouge. 

Berlin den 17ten Januar 

HKRRN MUSIK-DIREKTOR WaUOH, 

Amherst, i. Mass. 
(Wireless via. Sayville.) 
So bald wir (Selbst und Gott) den 
Kriege glucklich iur Ende gebra. lit 
haben und die gnadloae Englische 
fuechtig gestrafen haben moechte Ich 
gern dem Kaieerlicher Opernhaui 
wieder eine fierliche OfTnung anstel- 
len. Koenuen Sic DM gnadig die 
GelegeBheit beten Ihrea geschatite 
Orchester zu hoeren aollen wir gam 
zufrieden werden. Den beruehmten 
Kappelmeister Hurd moechten wir 
besonders willkommen machen. Hitte 
urn unmittelbaren Antwort. 

W i hi elm II. 



THE ROBINS CAMPAIGN 

, < Ml Hiiiffl from iwitfe 1 ] 



the conviction that everything ■• 
preaches he has already practiced in 
hisownlife." He iaoneof the strong- 
est types of Anierlcan manhood, 8 
man who braved the cold to win hie 
fortune as a proapector in the K Ion- 
dike, and later entered a ■till b.rder 
fight to clean up the bIubm of CM- 
cago. He comes to M. A. C wiw 
a message that is decidedly wortu 
hearing. 



RIFLE TEAM SHOOTS HIGH 

SCORE IN SECOND MATCH 



With 999 Out of Possible Thousand, 
Team Has Begun Success- 
ful Season. 

lu the second intercollegiate match, 
the College Rifle Team showed a 
marked improvement over the first 
match, making a score of 999 to 
their former one of 992. The first 
match was won by Washington State 
College with a score of 999. Michi- 
gan Aggie was second, with Cornell 
third, and M. A. C. fourth. The 
ollk-ial scores of the other teams for 
the second match have not been 
announced as vet. With onlv one 
point lacking out of a possible thou- 
sand, the Aggie team gives promise 
of a very successful season. The 
individual scores for the second 
match are as follows : 

KIIIKT KIVK. HK.rONK HVK, 

Aiken. 200 Haskell, tM 

Canlett. -'iki Oaaa, wh 

(Javenta, 200 Pbippe, l'.M 

Ulapp, 2W Raymond, li»H 

I;,, we. ltt» Tuthill. 1U7 



Totals, 



m«» 



ONO 



FRESHMEN WIN TWO 

PRELIMINARY GAMES 

Showing the results of good coach- 
ing, which made for excellent team 
work, the Freshmen hot-key team 
beat Amherst High by a score of 10 
to 1, on Wednesday afternoon. 
The game was played on the uew 
rink, which proved to be better than 
appearances would show. Ross ami 
Poole made a strong defenne for the 
Freshmen. Ross showing his ability 
to carry the puck down the ice and 
More, as well as defending his team. 
MaaMll &nd Harding were another 
pair who carried out s«»me pretty 
tt'iim work white in the center of the 
hi'. Chisholm also played a fast 
(.Mine at right wing and point. 
Goale: Ross, 3; Harding 3; Man 
bcII, 3; and Chisholm. 1. Heferees: 
Mill first half and Kichardson Hecono 
half. 

Saturday afternoon the Fresh man 
nud Sophomore hockey teams en- 
gaged in a practice match, the 
former winning 8 to 8. As the 
Sophomores lacked two men, Coach 
1 1 ill of the Freshman team and Ross 
of the varsilv played for them, but 
Ink of a first-class goal tender de- 
feated them. Some good team work 
was shown by Mansell and Harding 
of the Freshman team, and Ross 
played well on the defence. Of the 
iomores. Holmes and Dowd did 
»t The lineup: 

i-.Mtt l»'l* 

i ! holm, rw lw, llunnewell 

ii iiii«. rv '••• L. Beat 

M nit, lr »i •»" 

v HiilTiim. lw rw, Ifc.w.l 

I. ..^, ftp <|., Holmes 

h p p, Jackson 

I . . i/iihnliy. I K. Muntoon 

• Is made by -Manuel! S, llardimrM, 
U MB S, Dowd, Hill, L. Host: Heferee 
■H sbulm; Timer— Lawrence: Time— 
-<> nute halves. 



TELLS OF AWAKENING OF 

FAR EASTERN COUNTRIES 



Philip Schwartz, Returned from Rus- 
sia, Says Strategy Demands That 
We Christianize Them Now. 

Philip Schwartz, a Y. M. C. A. 
worker from Petrograd, Russia, gave 
an interesting talk before the College 
Y. M. C. A. Thursday evening on 
"Christianity aud the World Crisis." 

lu addressing the Association, he 
mentioned the great political and 
social upheaval that is going on in the 
old, once sleepy countries of the East, 
Everywhere the people are casting 
aside their old ideas and religiou and 
are looking to Christianity to take its 
place. China is fast awaking aud 
already is developing her resources 
to such au extent that her steel mills 
rival in size those of Pittsburg ami 
indeed do compete with the United 
States Steel Corporation. 

To illustrate the commercial con- 
quest of Korea by the United State*, 
Mr. Schwartz told of a friend who 
traveled on a modern railroae in that 
country. The car was made in Wil- 
mington, pulled by an engine made at 
Philadelphia over Pittsburg nteel mil* 
nailed to Oregon ties by New York 
spikes. For lunch on the dining car 
he had Chicago beef, Dakota wheat 
bread, PitUburg pickles and London 
jam on the side. 

But besides introducing into Chios 
the benefits of westerucivilizatiou the 
agents of this country are giving them 
Bomeofour worst evils. Therein licit 
the necessity for men of vision to go 
out to China and help mold her people 
while they ale still plastic. We have 
nothing to fear from an awakened 
China which has high ideals, but let 
them develop only in material gain 
and the yellow peril will become a 
real menace. 

Christianity is the only faith which 
can help the people in the nations of 
the East, Korea, China and India. 
A Spirit of strategy demands that we 
help them now, while the time is ripe 
and before they develop in the wrong 
way. When we realize that ihe 
Mohammedans are sending out Qve 
times the number of men to win them 
for Islam that the Christians are do- 
ing, our spirit of loyallv demands 
that we do something to win them for 
Jesus Christ. All types of men are 
needed in the foreign field today and 
there is a particularly large oppor- 
tunity for men trained in agriculture, 
to help in the physical ttpbulidfng of 
these countries. It is time for m to 
awake to our reaponaihitities for ser- 
vice in the interests of humaiiitv and 
world civilization. 

Mr Schwartz, is a graduate of 
Lafayette College in the class of 1910 
and spent three years travelling among 
the colleges of this country before 
being called to the foreign field. In 
Russia he worked among the students 
up to the outbreak of the present war, 
when he was forced to leave the conn* 
try. He expects to return, however, 
at the earliest possible time, and ' 
meanwhile Is speaking at man? of the 
colleges of the United States.* 



SPRINGFIELD AND WILLIAMS 
NEXT ON HOCKEY SCHEDULE 

Team in Oood Condition for Wednes- 
day Contest on New Rink. 

Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock 
Massachusetts meets Springfield Y. 
M. C. A. college on the new rink. 
This is the first home game of the 
season aud as the ice is in good con- 
dition the match should prove very 
interesting. Springfield beaten in 
football has determined to conquer 
on Wednesday. The return game 
will be played in Springfield Feb. 5. 
As Williams beat Springfield 5-S, the 
score of Wednesday's game should be 
a good indication of what the score 
will be Saturday with Williams. 

The last mentioned game to be 
played Saturday, Jan. 22, ought to 
be a close contest. Williams return 
game will be played in Williamstown, 
Feb. 22. 

Practice has been held on the new 
riuk, and with the promise of colder 
weather the rink should keep in shape 
the reBt of the season. 

For the information of the alumni 
It might be stated that II. A. C. is 
now equipped with an artificial rink 
taking the place of the old rink on the 
pond. The inconvenience of ice 

cracking has been eliminated and the 

snow after a storm is much nunc easily 
removed than formerly. To all ap- 
pearances the rink is superior to the 



pond and if it proves satisfactory dur- 
ing the season, rink Iniilding at Aggie 
will become an annual affair. 



1917 INDEX NOTICE. 

The 1U17 Index Hoard announces 
that their book may be purchased at 
any of the following places: Col- 
lege store. North College (anv time it 
is open;) at the college posl-ollke 
during office hours, or by mail from 
the business manager. 

An ii|wu»lli Omul Commission Mronoaliion- 
(Jasli lot test iirdfts- Articlr wnlrl, Adveftittd 
Cut-. i|ot*n exit- mm- in I'uNM-i i I. mis- Address 
Fni.ini-i'.hini; supply Co., »j;S \ ^th Street 
Philadelphia. Fa. 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron ant) Hi Mil 1'ipe. Valves 
*nd Ftllinictfo' Steam, Watet ami Ga», Asbestos 
and MagneMa Boiler and I'lpe Coverings, 1'ipr 
Cut to Sketch. Mill SapeHej Engireerp ind 
Conti.ii tntv do Steam and Hot VY'sttl Heating, 
Automatic Sprtnklet Systems, Boiler ind Engiea 
Connections. Holyoke, Mass. 

Candies and Ice Cream 

** II AMI' »» 



«( 



BIDE-A-WEE " 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty— And other roodJlWliti to est. 
MRS. L. M. STRBBINS. 

M'dellr Street, Hartley, Maw. 

Tel. 415W 

hold Ularrcn 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T, J, AHERN, MANAGER 



iB 9 Q I are supplied every year 

Burpee s deeds (Hrcctt ° n, ° re Amcrf - 

» can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality ** Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914,— a bright new book of 1 82 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO.. Burpee Building,, Philadelphia 



F^aurc**^ Shoe Store 

Largt-st St ock — Lowest Prices 

ISxpert K.-piiiriiiM i:,-sl Ir.'.tlMri.srd 



School and College photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 52 Center St.. Northampton, Mass., 



Main Orricfc. 

1546-1548 Broadway. 

New York City 



and South Hadley, Mass. 

These Studm* offer the bent skilled 
.rrtiMs and mnt campJrte 

equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



-DKALKRS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 18, 1916. 



Tho Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 18, 1916. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIA^ 

Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 



STUDENT BODY ELECTS 

FLINT TRACK MANAGER 



MIDDLESEX FASTEST IN 

COUNTY RELAY RACES 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 
TYLER 8. ROOKRS '16. Bditor-tn-Tnlef 

RICHARD W. SMITH '17. 
FRANK J. 8<'HKUFKI.K , 16. 
THUS. U. HARROOKS'le, 
AI.KKKDA.mOIOBA'lS. 
UWIGHT V. MARNKH '16, 
MII-FORD R. LAWRKNt K '17. 



Managing Editor 

Assistant Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Alumni Editor 

News Editor 



ELUOT IIKNMK.KSON'n. department Editor 
WILLIAM HAVILI.K..IK. '17, < ampus Editor 
MARSHALL. > . I.AM'HKAK MS. AMfl^ Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

CHAB. A. HUNTINGTON. JK. 18. 

Business Manager 

MERRILL P. WARN KR 17. 

Assistant Huslneaa Manager 

LESTER E. FIKLDIN<i 1H. 

Advertising Manager 

JAMES C. POW Kl.l. It. I treulation 



Lowell High Graduate Has Been In 
Competition Since Freshman Year- 

Olivers. Flint '17, of Lowell was 
chosen manager of the 'varsity track 
team nt an election held after the 
assembly of Jan. 1 1. Flint is a grad- 
uate of Lowell High sbool in the class 
of 1911, and entered M. A. C. in the 
fall of 1918. He entered the compe- 
tition for assistant manager in the 
spring of his freshman year, working 
through practically two track seasons. 
Last year he ran on the 1917 cross 
country team and was captain of the 
claBs rifle team. He is now a mem- 
ber of the 'varsity rifle squad. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 6 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble tO CHARI.KS A. HUNTINOTOS, .)k. 

Entered aa second-class matter at the Amherst 
Port Office. 

Vol. XXVI. Tussday, J»a. 18. Mo. IS 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped In 
HIPS COII BI1U1 »fl»ieor handed to William 
SavlUe. Jr. "17 on »r before the Sat unlay preced- 
ing each Issue.) 

\Vki>nk8I>a\ • i VN - 1H - 
1-10 v. II ftwhlTi Mr. Friin.i* II. 
S:tyr*\ WilliiiiiiHtnwn. AMltt- 
ant to ill* 1 I'roshlriit »>f Wil- 
liam* OoHorO' 
;*-:«> v. m. -Ilm'kfv. Spriiiullfld V. M. 
<\ \. OoUsgt, 
Tiu'iisnAV, .Iav -" 
tJ-M l». m.-Y. II. C. A. moiMlnu'. chapel. 

Kkihay, .1 vn It. 
7-15 p M.-lntenliisH bookotboll HUM 
vs. 1»17: IMS TO. 1»1J». 

B vti m< vv. .Ian. "22. 

»,H0 i\ v.— Hockey. Williams College. 
Siini»av, .1 \n 18* 

9-10 a. m.-< Jsopol.Bot .Koforft-lwrbom, 
Pastor KlrM Pftftsl I'lnm-h. 
Dotckostor, Mi«*h. 
Wki»nksi>av, .1 \>. 88. 

1-10 p. ii. — Assembly, Mr Jerome Ki«l- 
,| ( >i ami (>u;»rii'i lr«. in Hamp- 
ton liiHtituir. Virjjltiia. 



NOTICES 

A course in Market (iitidening will 
he given for the second semester. 1 '.» 1 <> . 

Kntrance condition examinations 
are scheduled as follows : 

Wednesday, .Inn. 19 at :t-30 P. M., 
English (Reqnired). 

Saturday, Jnn. 22. 1 to 3 p. m., 
Algebra and IMane (ieometry. 

History by appointment with Mr. 

Rand. 

French and Ormiin by appoint- 
ment with the insti iKt«)i'. 

Kxamiuations not here scheduled 
may be arranged with the instructor. 

CORRECTION 

The committee in charge of the 
poultry judging contest for next 
year was incorrectly slated in last 
week's Collegian. The committee 
consists of the following: Prof. 
W. F. Kirkpatrick of Connecticut, 
chairman; Prof. H. K. Lewis of 
Hew Jersey, O. B. Kent of ConuM, 
Md L. F. Payne of M. A. C. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Myrton F.Evans '19 of Soraemlle 
was elected manager of the class 
relay team yesterday. 

The staff of the Horticultural Divis- 
ion to the number of two sled loads 
negotiated a sleigh ride on Saturday 
evening. They went to Montague 
for the customary chicken pie. 

Harold C. Bales, Dartmouth '09. 
who has been taking graduate work 
here as candidate for a degree lias 
been elected superintendent of the 
union school district of the towus of 
Tolland, Granville and Sninlisfield. 
Tfcc position carries a salary of 
$1,500. 

Through the action of the trus- 
tees, Prof. W. P. B. Lockwood, head 
of the dairy department, has been 
delegated to spend his time in the 
interests of the National Dairy Show 
(to be held in Springfield) for the 
next three months to bring the mat- 
ter of the show before the dairy asso- 
ciations throughout the east. Dur- 
iug this time Professor I/>ckwood 
will visit the Vermont Dairy Associ- 
ation, the national meeting of the 
Ayreehire Breeders' Association in 
Philadelphia, and later meetings in 
Maryland and New Jersey Pro- 
fessor I^ockwood was also a member 
of the committee which went to Chi- 
cago to secure the locating of the 
national show in the east. 



PROBABLE SUCCESSOR 

TO W. H. BOVVKER 

According to statements given out, 
Gov. McCall has promised to ap- 
point A. G. Pollard of I/>well to the 
board of trustees to fill the vacancy 
made by the death of the board's 
oldest member William H. Bowker 
of Boston. Mr. Pollard was for 14 
years a member of the board but 
failed to be reappointed under Gov. 
Walsh and his return to the board will 
b# welcomed not only by the agricul- 
tural interests of the state but by bis 
fellow members of the board who 
made immediate efforts to have him 
named as Mr. Bowker's successor as 
soon m the Governor took np his 
duties. 



Interesting Series Brings Out Best 
Material In Many YearB 

Last Wednesday, on the board 
track, the first of the series of 116 
Intercounty relay races was run off. 
Most of the races proved to be inter- 
esting to the spectators as well as 
to the contestants, a forecast of an 
eventful season. The Middlesex 
team made the fastest time, cover- 
ing the distance in 2.12, just five 
seconds slower than the record put 
up by Connecticut last year. This 
is remarkable time for so early in 
the season. Plymouth, Suffolk, 
Middlesex, Norfolk and Hampshire 
Counties with New Jersey and the 
World Wides, won their respective 

races. 

Coach Dickinson wants it under- 
stood that medals will be awarded to 
the winners, and that it is not merely 
a probability. Although there are 
around forty candidates out on the 
track every afternoon between 3-00 
and 4-30 he would like to see more 
and promises to give them individual 
instruction. Looking over the in- 
dividual times, some surprises were 
unearthed by the Freshmen clasB 
candidates. In the seven years that 
the coach has been at M. A. C. 
either as a student, or otherwise, 
there has never before been such 
good material from the lowest class, 
and he predicts a great future for 
track. 

Training table starts this week for 
the Varsity team and if these men 
show i he same speed throughout the 
season they should come through 
undefeated. Their first race will be 
at the Coast Artillery Games, Bos- 
ton, on Jan. W. A week later they 
will meet W. P. I. at the B. A. A. 
Meet. Following some practice 
races with Amherst, for the purpose 
of giving the team experience, the 
season will be finished at Hartford 
on Washington's Birthday. 

At 4 o'clock Thursday afternoon 
two races of the Interclaas Series 
will be held, the results of which will 
be added to the score of the Inter- 
class Meet to be held Feb. 26. 
Owing to the fact that 4l M" men are 
ineligible to compete, the Freshmen 
are looked upon at present as the 
likely winners. 

The schedule for this week is as 
follows : 

MotTaMTj Jan. 24. 
Bristol vs. Franklin. 
Hampshire vs. World Wides. 
Connecticut vs. New Jersey. 
Barnstable vs. Middlesex. 

Wrdnesoat, Jan. 26. 
Barnstable vs. New York. 
Berkshire vs. Plymouth. 
Bristol vs. Essex. 
Connecticut vs. Hampden. 
Franklin vs. New Jersey. 
Hampshire vs. Worcester. 
Middlesex vs. Suffolk. 
Ho race* scheduled for Friday, 



Jan. 28, or during the week of Jau 
81. 

Thursday, Jam. 20. 

First of Interclass Series. 
Friday, Jan. 21. 

Bristol vs. Middlesex. 

Berkshire vs. Suffolk. 

Essex vs. Norfolk. 

Hampden vs. Worcester. 



We invite you 

To examine our stoch. 
To consider onr motives, 
To try onr prices. 

We have the latest and best books; 
we can get you any bnok this side o( 
Germany. Give us a chance and you'll 
be satisfied. Our prices are the same as 
at the treasurer's office; if we stick you, 
don't shri. k ; you saw us coming. 

R. A. Mooney rl. W. Bishop 



JOHNSON BOOK CO. 

85 Pleasant Street 



WHI 1 WILL YOU BOY 

A "cream thief" or 
a "savings bank" 
Cream Separator 1 



A CREAM SEPARATOR IS used 
twice a day, 730 times a year, and if 
it wastes a little cream every time 
you use it it's a "cream thief", and 
an expensive machine even »f you 
got it as a gift. 

BUT IF IT SKIMS CLEAN TO 
the one or two hundredths of onr 
per cent, as thousands and thou 
sands of tests with a Hancock Tester 
show the De Laval does, then it's a 
cream saver, and the most profitable 
machine or implement on the farm 
—a real "savings bank" for iU 
fortunate owner. 

THE MOST PROFITABLE ma 
chine on the farm is a De Laval 
Cream Separator. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

iff. Brasdwar .New York 

IB B. Madison St.. Cbkago 



UNITY CHUBOH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith. 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKOULAK StTODAT SERTICK AT 7 I* ■• 



CO. 



LOW PRICE TMLORIM. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDEK 

Suits Cleaned, Pressed and Df»d. A»* r f*r 

Kepmlrihs for Ladies and Gentlemen nwt* w». 

Hiih-trade work by first class tailor *«r« 

calfedTor and d*H*er«d. Sell rickets for pr ««* 

4 torn fos ji.i» _ __ 

GEORGE KOrOWIU, *"«*■* 

S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 
Oculists' Prescriptions Filled, Brosy tig 

Promptly and Skilfall? Done. 



XAMINATION SCHEDULE 

FOR TWO LOWER CLASSES 

Examinations for the Freshman 
1 nd Sophomore classes will follow 
he schedule given below : 

Tuesiuy, Feb. 1, 1916. 

m-30 a. M. — Sophomore Agionomy 1 
1-30 p. m. — Sophomore Military Tac- 
tics 
Wednesday, Feh. 2, 1916, 

$•90 A. M. — Sophomore Physics 1 
s-:i0 a. m. — Freshman Mathematics 1 
1-30 p. m. — Sophomore French and 

German 
l-.'K) p. m. — Freshman English 1 
Thubsday, Feb. 3, 1916. 

S-30 a. m. — Sophomore Zoology 1 
h-30 a. m. — Freshman Chemistry 1 
1-30 p. m. — Sophomore English 3 
l-.iiip. M. — Freshman French and 
German 

Fhiday, Feu. 4, 1916. 

h-'M) a. M. — Sophomore Physics, La- 
boratory 

H-30 A. M, — Freshman Solid Geom- 
etry and Animal Hus- 
bandry 

I lit v. m. — Sophomore Elec Chem- 

istry and Elective Ani- 
mal Husbandry 
1-30 i*. m. — FreBhraan Military Tac- 
tics 
Anv examinations not scheduled 
al>ove must be arranged for by ap- 
pointment with the instructor in 
charge of the subject. 

VERMONT TO DEBATE HERE. 

Burlington, Vt., Jan. 6. — A var- 
sity debate has been arranged by the 
Vermont manager with the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College as op- 
ponents at Amherst, February 18, 
upon the following question ; 

Itrsotrpd, that an amendment to the 
Constitution of the United States 
should be passed prohibiting the man- 
ufacture and sale of intoxicating 
li-iuors within the United States." 

The team selected to represent 
Vermont against M. A. C. consists 
J. B. Ellis '17, It. L. Gristlier '16. 
and P. K. Johnson MM, with F. H, 
Isham '16 as alternate. 

PASSED RHODES EXAM 

Everett Richards '16, whose name 
has been before the committee to 
select the Rhodes scholars, has been 
advised to hold his name over for at 
least one year. Richards success- 
fully passed the Rhodes Scholarship 
examinations last fall, but inasmuch 
u he has not yet graduated from col- 
lage the committee suggested that it 
■odd be better to hold over s year. 

II i.nrdswas recently elected a mem- 
N f the honorary society Phi Kapps 
Pi,, 



IU 

da». 

Mr 

of 
H. 

tw 

f0! 



ORMAL WELL ATTENDED 
»>out 75 couples attended Satar- 
i Informal in the Drill Hall. 

Qaalfe and Mrs. Chamberlain 
I. A. C. f Mrs. Wheeler of Mount 

>ke, Mrs. Orcott ami Miss Maley 
ith College were the chape rones. 

oi tb's orchestra of Northampton 

-hed music for the dancing. 



BASKETBALL 

[Continued from patce 1] 

ended the game with a two point 
lead for the Sophomores. Sedgwick 
and F. Grayson played their usual 
game for 1918, while Perry and 
Darling did most of the scoring for 
the Senior team. 

1917, 29; 1919, 23 
With better team work than they 
showed last week, the Juniors kept 
their Freshmen opponents on the 
run during the entire game. Accur- 
ate shooting by Squires, Irving and 
E. Grayson piled up the points in 
rapid succession until at half time 
the ecore was 1 r»-10 in favor of the 
Juniors. In the second half Pond 
and MacCarthy started a rally for 
the first year men, but it was not 
enough to overcome the lead against 
them and the game ended with the 
l'.M7 men six points ahead. K. 
(iiuyson was a bright light for the 
winners, and Pond, Parkhurst and 
MacCarthy worked bard for the 
Freshmen. 

The scores : 

mm* isms 

K PS t I K. I- 

Vick.-i*. If, ll I rl., Hosts, 8 
llawlcv. rl. I 2 lb, Hall, 1 I) 2 

P. Grays «•, I -i <•, Parry, :i 4 n 

Sp<lu'«irk,rli, I 4 If, Kiiii:, 

Qassar, if. l U 2 

Minor, If. (i rt. Darling, 2 I) 4 



IK 



III 



11117 1919 

Iivinu, If, | 1 5 rh.l'itrkhurMt, u 

Bqvlrw, 

Hack, rf, :» o u Id. Whinlr, 
B.GraysoB.c, 2711 lb, WUllaass, 1 <• I 
Baffsb 

state, r«, 1 D 2 .-. I'mui, :i 11 u 

Dag . ataeki 

Baltay, lb, e, w I. 11 II 

tf, MacCarthy, 109 
rf.l'ruwe, 1 . r i 7 

rf.Bahlu0dfr.il 11 



2U 2:1 

Kras tin- mlasait Crows 10, R. tiny* 

Mill H. 

Haf aiaa BwafltldeJ Brawn; TUnar— 

II it-kta of M. \ i '.. Nion-r llulil.n : 
Time 2H minute li;iK. - 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

I « • m t lim-'l rr«m paga 1 1 

was twice rejected by Ike House of 
Lords. The result of this latter 
action was that the power of veto 
was taken away from the upper house 
We were trying to get a correct valu- 
ation of land when the great wsr 
broke out. 

God knows what will happen to tM 
when we pay our next deht from tax- 
ation. War is costly slid :i great 
blow to democracy. This war la no 
man's war and we want to see it rod. 
Then we will appeal to the minds of 
our young men and we feel they will 
respond. But here in the United 
States with your many yeople, and 
many institutions of free government, 
you must show the countries across 
the water that peace and happiness 
car. come if there is a United States 
of Europe, 



CAMPION 

Fine Tailoring 

COLLEGE OUTFITTER 

Ready-To- Wear Clothes 

/=. A. SHERARD 

MEI STS STO RE 

Use Our New Cash Discount Card and Save Five Per Cent 



— ON — 



SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



Come to us for- 



Pireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



FREE 



l~ K fc_ E. 



For a few days only here's your chance to get 

FREE 

With a 90c Humidor of Tuxedo Tobacco, a 
GENUINE FRENCH BRIAR 

PIPE 

SEE THEM IN THE WINDOW 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

I he Kexall Store— Ob the Corner. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 18, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 18, 1916. 



J. OINSBURO 

it i-a Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

70C Special Half Sole, Rubber 75c 

REPAIRING 

Black, Tan, White Work Guaranteed. 

PRICKS 

Rubber Soles . ....•'•»» 

Kubber Soles, with Heels •1.7ft 

Soles Sewed, ...••• "** 

a Shine* fur •1.0O 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours : 9 to u A. M., 1-30 to 5 P. H. 



STEAM KITTING. Telephone 59— R 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 
Windows, Lead Lights, &c. 

4 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS. 



NO DEFINITE ACTION 

ABOUT COACH BRIDES 

The board of trustees has referred 
the matter of retaining Dr. Brides' 
services as coach to President Butter- 
field for further consideration. It is 
understood that the President will in- 
vestigate the matter of ways and 
means before any definite action is 
taken by the board. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

GROUPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work speaks for itself. 

HASH BLOCK, AMHERST. MASS. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN & DYER,* Props. 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
— Pens— 

HunnLiimiii IHO'J 

Stkphen Lank Fot,oek 

MANI'rAOTOHINO JUWRLKR 

ISO HROADWAY. NKW YORK 



OL.UH AM) COI.LKUB 
PINS AND RlN<iH «* 

• Mti.ft, *»t?.v«»w **rr» otowh mnoaw» 



HOW ABOUT A NEW SUIT ? 



Select it today. The new styles in Autumn and Winter patterns await 
your inspection. You will want a stylish, comfoittble SUIT or OVER- 
COAT. Step in and examine our line. Style is the addition to ihe latest 
fashion, to your individual need. Custom clothes aie designed tot YOU, 
not simply cut to fit the stocky sized man. Our Cents' Furnishing line is of 

The Latest Goods in Shirts and Collars 

Kid Gloves, all styles New Dress Vests at very reasonable prices 



Al.l. KINI.S UK REPAIR WORK NKVIIY AM> FROMfTLY W>M 



DYEING 



XLTKRING 



CLKANING 



PKKSSING 



LABROVITZ, 



Custom Tailor 



11 AMITY M 



WAR ANP POTASH 



War is .iiiing on the lid of the German Potash rUfT. I 1 he Amen, an I- »r««i ha* 
logo wuhouf.l m .016-Y.I MM6W.II In the year « bm '\^^^L^ ,W « N, » 
and should be the year of biggest crops for his benefit WhsiMhr snsan . 

The Potash la In your Soil-Start It working ! 

Nitrogen and Phosphoric Acid will do It- They will produce plan.,, Minn..,,.) 
Sroofand vigorous to help themselves to the inactive Potash now latent ... >,..,. m„I 



NINETEEN THIRTEEN NOTES 

J. B. Cobb has closed "Birchem 
Bend Farm" for the winter and taken 
a position with the WestmghouseCo., 
manufacturing munitions. He has 
been learning the art near Hartfoid 
but will he stationed at Chicopee 
Falls in a few weeks. 

C. M. Packard, government euto- 
mologist, stationed at Wellington, 
K:ins., was in Springfield over Christ- 
mas and New Years, on his anuual 
vacation. He is spending two months 
in Washington working up his field 
notes. 

James U Holdcn, ehemist for 
Powers Weightinnn A Bosengarten 
of Philadelphia was at home during 
Christmas in Palmer and visited col- 
lege. "Jiininii" infoims us that his 
company gave their employees 10% 
of their yearly salary for Christmas 
and have made a profit of 189, 000,000 
since the war in Km ope. 

"Johnny" Mayer and "Tom" 
Dooley were at the Aggie-Tech 
hockey game during vacation. 

Marshall Headle visited college 
this week. 

"Dr." Niles Paul Larson spent the 
Christmas holidays working in the 
Bellevue hospital. New York city. 

N1NETEEN-FIFTEEN NOTES 

"Chef Spofford is just starting on 
a six weeks' vacation. He is work- 
ing for the Job! B Lime Company at 
the Notch, and hat been getting fat 
on the job. Even at that, they are 
going to keep him another year. 

•Ben'' Yener visited the college 
Saturday. He i» working for Tait 
Brothers, Springfleld, his work being 
in the lines of chemistry and sanita- 
tion. 






Hubbard* Bone Base Fertilizers 

contain the nitrogen and phosphoric acid in right per- 
centages for whatever crops you want to raise. 




urn. .. THE R OGERS g HUBBABP COMPAWY ..S:,,,, 



COPLEY SQUARE HOTEL 

Huntington Ave., Eseter and Blagden Sts., Boston, Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

AMOft H. WMIPPIE. 



"Ray" McKechuie has gone into 
his father's business. He and his 
brother are working together in 
Natick. 

Harold Willey is working with 
Ralph Holts at Ball's Farm in 
Granbv. 

The engagement is announced of 
Miss Viola K. Bryant of Westfield to 
Ashley C. Le Due. Ashley is now 
back teaching in the Esses County 
Agricultural school, after having been 
sick for two or three weeks with 
measles. 



Carpfivtcr & Morehoust, 

PRINTERS, 



No. 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Maaa. 



GLEE CLUB CONCERT 
The Combined Musical Cluba made 
their first trip on a series of engage- 
ments in the vicinity of Amherst, last 
Friday night in the* Hadley town hall 
under* the auspices of Hopkina Acad- 
emy. A concert was given, followed 
by "a dance until li. Over 45 men 
men made the trip. 



EXPERIMENT STATION NEWS 

The peculiar condition of the ferti 
lizer market for the year 19 K, 
brought about by the European war 
and the blocking of the Panama 
canal, places the farmer in an ex- 
tremely difficult position and it is 
with the idea of giving timely help 
on the fertilizer subject that Dr. 
Brooks, Director of the Experiment 
Station, after conference with other 
station directors, has issued Circular 
No. 59 under the title "The Use of 
Fertilizers in 1916." After briefly 
outlining the fertilizer situation Prof. 
Brooks advises the adoption of all 
measures by which the use of com- 
mercial fertilizers can be lessened. 
Among these measures he advises 
putting all hoed crops on the better 
soils with better tillage and drainage 
and the use of indirect fertilizers, 
such as lime and land plaster; un- 
usual care in saving and applying 
farm manures ; and the use of or- 
ganic refuse, wood ashes, green 
manuring, and in the coast sections 
kelp and seaweed. Where commer- 
cial fertilizers are UBed. quantities 
to be used to yield the best results 
from the various crops are also given. 
Contrary to the usual practice this 
circular is to In sent to the Massa- 
chusetts mailing list aud as a timely 
publication is of great value to the 
farmer who is planning bis use of 
fertilizers for uezt season. 
Bulletin No. 164. 
Bulletin No. 164 has just been re- 
ceived from the printers and is now 
ready for free distribution at the Ex- 
periment Station. 

The bulletin is in two parts and is 
a well arranged and tabulated publi- 
cation based on the work of the sta- 
tion and written by Dr. J. B. Limb 
sey. As an introduction to the bul- 
letin Dr. Lindsey says, "This hub 
letin contains the results of our ob- 
servations covering a series of yean 
in the raising of calves for dairy pur- 
poses. In Part I, is described the 
method followed and the cost of rais- 
ing calves to six or eight months of 
age on skim milk, ordinary grains 
and hay ; also the testing of several 
proprietary calf meals as milk substi- 
tutes, and our experience wi th a num- 
ber of our own calf meal prepara- 
tions. In part II f is given the total 
food cost of raising twenty dairy 
heifers, together with dsta from other 
sources, relsUve to the food a#d 
other costs. It is believed that t<S 
to $85 represents the total «»!* of 
raising Ihe average dairy heifer un- 
til she reaches the age of two years'' 
Of this cost, prscttcslly, 15* l* sf 
signed to food and the greater part 
of the rest goes for labor in e*»« 
Interest on the stock and equipment 



and the initial value of the he.f. 
also reckoned in but are offset !•_-■ 
value of the manure with whkl 
two year old heifer is credited. 
The bulletin also contain* 
pages of plates showing s mim' 
the calves with which these ex 
ments were carried on. 



are 
the 
th* 

Art 
rof 
4fb 



I LECTION ADVANCES 

J. F. EASTMAN 07 

J. F. Eastman, professor of agron- 
omy at the New York State School 
uf Agriculture at Morrisville, N. Y. 
has resigned his position to take 
effect about Feb. 10, that he may 
;.. cept the position of farm bureau 
agent in Broome county, to which 
position he was elected at a meeting 
f the exeeutive committee of the 
liroome County Farm Bureau Asso- 
ciation held in Binghamton Jan. 6, 

Professor Eastman, a native of 
Townsend, was graduated from the 
Massachusetts Agricultural college at 
Amherst in 1907. After two years 
as assistant professor of agronomy 
in the New Hampshire State College 
of Agriculture, he weut to the Univer- 
sity of Illinois at Champagne, where 
he spent a year in the special study 
of farms crops and soil fertility. He 
received the degree of Master of 
Science for this work in 1910, and was 
appointed to the position he has held 
in Morrisville soon after. 

Professor Eastman has been a most 
conscientious worker at the State 
Nctiool, and through his direction of 
tbe work in farm crops the two farms 
which were bought for the school six 
years ago, have been brought to a 
high state of cultivation, eleven acres 
of alfalfa have been successfully 
seeded, snd system of fertility and 
crop experiments started that in a few 
years will be of a great deal of value 
to the agriculture of central New 
York. 

Professor and Mrs. Eaatman have 
been active workers in the local 
Methodist church, as well as in otliei 
community affairs, and while the 
change is a promotion for them, they 
will have manv friends who will be 
softy to see them go. 

STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 
Professor Clark, bea i of the For- 
estry Department, gave a very inter- 
esting lecture Wednesday evening, 
taking for his subject the "Farm 
M"<>dlot." During the evening 
iWessor Clark gave several good 
ideas concerning the care of a wood- 
lot. Slides were shown to illustrate 
wante in cutting, need of thinning in 
itenss stands, precautions against 
fire, and harm done in harvesting, 

SILVER FOOTBALLS 

I he "M" men of last fall's win- 
ding football team were presented 
*ith miniature silver footballs by 
I ident Bntterfield st chapel Fri- 
day. The charms are the gift of the 
•tudent body. On one side is in- 
scribed a small maroon "M" and the 
« ..*rals "1915", while on On re- 
» side are the player's Initials 
**1 position. Fourteen players. 
Monger Moses and Coach Brides 
ved them. 



'• — R, L. Adams is now head of 
«■■ newly organized department of 
* Br ; management in the University 

rjf iifornia. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

The following have become life 
members of the Associate Alumni ou 
payment of $25 : Herbert Myrick *H2, 
.1. It. Miuor '7.'), Dr. H. .1. Wheeler 
'n:5. Dr. B. L. Hartwetl '*!>, Dr. J. 
(ioldthwait 'H5, David Coodale *8i, 
G. P. Smith '79, Eg. J. Sullivan *95, 
A. F. Shiverick •*■>, Dr. T. S. Ba- 
con '91 . 

'95. — A. B. Smith of Chicago has 
contributed $5 toward the Athletic 
Field. 

'03. — W. K. Toltingham is one of 
the authors of an article on the rela- 
tion of Sulphur Compounds to Plant 
Nutrition contained in Vol. 5, No. G. 
of the Journal of Agricultural 
Reward' . 

'08. — John U. Parker, assistant 
entomologist at the Montana State 
College Experiment Station payed a 
short \ isit to II. M. Jeiiuison 'OH in 
St. Louis on his return from Colum- 
bus, Ohio, where he had read a very 
interesting paper ou the Western 
Wheat Aphis. During his eastern 
trip Parker made a short visit to the 
home of his parents at Windsor, Conn. 

'10. — W. C. Johnson has been 
elected one of the ollicers of the Coe- 
Mortimer Feitilizer corporation. 

'II. — C. A. Smith is joint author 
in the 1 llh of a series of Studies in 
Metabolic Processes, published in the 

Journal <>f lliolo'jii',tl ( 'he in i st ri/ for 
December. 

'15, — M. F. Sherman iw engaged 
in landscape gardening work with 
G. Aldersev Clark of Boston. 



ADDITIONS TO LIBRARY 

Mr. (tieen. the librarian SftDOttDOes 
the following acquisitions to the 
library I 
Baker, I. a n Holde ><• beat action in 

Ki.ulisb. H'1.1. 
Baker, K. A, \ gntde to hfartorlesl 

Union. IBM. 

iirown. k. Poults B— Kandrj 

Brjrea, J. It. Vtaeonnl \a America •!«•! 

S.i.l. I»I4. 

California. State grant* journal «4 pro 

easdlnx*, &i 4«, itH 1*. 
Cameron, \.G, The Torraas System, 
Delaware, Mate granite journal of pfo- 

ceedfaft*, SI- «». HW H- 

Dinner, Hugo, lining n.i I OrganiastlM 
itttd Management. 

llalilaiif, .1. B. Mechanism, Uf«\ and 

perwoiiality. MM 4. 

ilium.'!, v M. Bs twe a Bt &•»« - 

ami si, George, 
.lotos. II. ('. « on.lu<imi> an.l vlneoui- 

UtH in pure ami mixed ttoUeiita. 
Kinsley, A. 1 \ lextbook of veterinarj 

pathology. 
Mact;reg«r, T. I». The l»M.k ol lliriH 
Matthews, A, Fifty yoaw el agrbni 

tnral pol'uii*. 
Kew Hampshire. State grange journal 

ot proceeding* SI 40, iwi4 18, 
s. vs v,, r k, (Hate grumum lournsl of pro 

eeedli.gp.Hii 4U, )!««» 1 1 
Seaboard airline railway. Miippew' 

guide 1S»14. 
Shaw. KernMMt, CMnese fores! iree«.and 

i imher sttppij IW I 
Htoiit, A. I'. Tbf .staUlisliineiit of var- 

let ie^ in I'oletin, 

Washtnsion. State grass's journal of 

pr o c e e dings SI 27, hnk* if, 
Wood. K. K Tin- notebook of an attach^ 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

L«nses ground while you wait 

College Jewelmv 

Violin, Banjo, Mandnlin and Guitar Strings 

AMHKRVT, MASS. 
N'ext to Post Office. 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Florlcultural Drpt. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at ic.sonable rates 
to students and facultv. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

(ikOWN ON THE CAMPUS 
Telephone son 



OUR PRICES ON HIGH-GRADE SUITS 

AND OVERCOATS ARE ALWAYS 

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Now to reduce our stock for inventory we are offering our entire 

stock of 

Suits and Overcoats at a Reduction 
of 20% from the Regular Prices 

This stock is made up ol Hart Schaflner and Marx Clothes to- 
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Stock up on Shirts-Manhattan Shirt Sale 



2.00 Shirts 
.50 Shirts 



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E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 



— Write for Particulars — 
Local Agency Manager 



THE OOE-MORTIMER COMPANY 

$1 Chambers St., New York City. 









LI 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 18, 1916. 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSThlN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Mow I,, cited over po*t office. Up ( > n * rhslit 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System Tel- 3°-M 

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Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open -.inula > from 7-ia. On your way to P. O. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College F0UNTAIN ™ 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of llillman and IJurnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, M m modern hos- 
telry run on the European 1'lan. It is just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the Dustness district. 

Its room* arc well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices •» and up; rooms 
with bath ismgle) •l.fto and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
loom makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of tlie nighest quality, well cooked and 
served in tne best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you wiil 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 



Otters courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
depart. nents, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Floriculture 

Forestiy 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



evening. 



D. H. SIEVERS, 



Highland Motel. 



>|.i lugftfltl, Mmi. 



SMUT, WWII III 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
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KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



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DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 




Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletic*, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'.d Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association, U< 

Tennis Association, 

Kifle Club. 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen ludex, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index. 

M. A. C Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Clnb, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
S. W. Hall, President 

R. L. Holden, Manager 
A. W. Spaulding, Manager 

D. A. Ricker, Manager 
A. Iluutiugton, Jr., Manager 

N. Moorhouse, Manager 

II. Aiken, President 

J. T. Nicholson, Manager 

F. A. Anderson, Manager 

L. E. Fielding, Manager 

F. W. Mayo, Manager 

K. L. Messenger, Manager 

A. J. Hicks, President 

E. L. King, President 

C. H. Gould, President 

R. F. Taber, President 



HIMH'I BOOK AGENTS. 
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Stationery, Newspapers, 
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A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



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From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
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Mai 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVI. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 25, 1916. 



No. 16 



FIRST HOME GAME VICTORY 
OVER SPRINGFIELD SEVEN 

Aggie Hockey Flayers Put Up Fast 

Game in Second Half and 

Win by 3-1 Score. 

Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege defeated Springfield Y. M. C. 
A. College at hockey on the M. A. 
C. rink by a score of three to one 
Wednesday. The game was fast and 
close and M. A. (.'. did not win until 
the closing minutes of the second 
half when a belated rally cinched the 
game. Springfield scored first when 
a repound shot eluded Buttrick dur- 
ing the opening minutes of the first 
half. After the score M. A. C. con- 
stantly outplayed the visitors but in- 
accurate shooting and a lack of any- 
thing resembling team work prevented 
a score. Koss several times captured 
the puck and eluded the entire visit- 
ing team only to have Barrett turn 
aside the shot at the goal. The half 
ended with the visitors ahead and it 
waa not until the second half was 
pretty nearly over that Ross after 
dribbling the puck the length of the 
rink slipped it by the Springfield net 
guardian for the tying score. Things 
began to happen about that time and 
Cliisholm passed the puck to Wooley 
who shot a pretty goal. With the 
puck near the Aggie goal the home 
team displayed a Hash of team work 
that carried the puck the length of 
the rink and Sanderson shot the final 
goal on a pass from Wooley. The 
game ended shortly after the score. 

For M. A. C. Ross was the par- 
ticular star, but the whole team put 
up a good article of hotkey. Wooley 
and Cbisbolm played a consistaut 
game and Plaisted broke up a good 
many rushes, while Buttrick stopped 
tdl but one of Springfield's shots, 
«ome of which were pretty difficult. 
Barrett guarded the Springfield net 
in good style and Bunker put up a 
good game. 

The line-up. 



\i. \. ■ . 

Wlldoa, Sanderson, rw 

i'hisholm, re 
Kemahl, lc 
U'im »!«•>, Iw 
Koss, <|> 
i'laisted, p 

Kijttrlek, u 



■PMRttl II ii' 

|W, M.nKclii>> 

lc Talbot 

re, Hunker 
rw, Jenkins 

1 •)!, Yfiilliati 

p, Wilson 
U, llarrcit 



RUNNING TRACK WILL BE 
BUILT BY STUDENT LABOR 

Deficit of $1000 in Field Fund. Call 

For Volunteers As Soon As 

Frost Is Out. 

As soon as the frost is out of the 
ground this spring construction will 
start on the new running track for 
Alumni Field and whatever is done 
will be done by student labor. With 
the field fund 1 1000 in debt, Do 
money is available to build a cinder 
track and the matter now rests entirely 
in the hands of the student body. 
The grounds department has already 
hauled about half the cinders required, 
piling them along the west and south 
sides of the field. This department 
will also do the work of stripping off 
the sod when the time comes, after 
which student labor will he neces- 
sary. The preliminary work is being 
done on the assumption that the 
student body is as willing to help 
build the athletic field now as it was 
two years ago. 

Only the 100-yard straightaway 
will be built at first. If the students 
show the proper spirit, the 220-yard 
straightaway will then be added and 
finally the quarter mile track will be 
completed. With half as much work 
aa the students did on the draining 
system in the spring of 1914 the en- 
tire track can be finished in time for 
the outdoor track season. An early 
spring will allow construction to start 
some time in March, when the stu- 
dents will be called upon to screen 
the cinders and mix them with loam. 
From that time on the field is likely 
to be a busy place. If the men come 
through as they .are expected to, the 
meet scheduled for May 27 with 
Worcester Tech can be run on the M. 
A.C. track. 

Professor Hicks wishes to impress 
firmly on the student body that $200 
in pledges still remain unpaid. Two 
letters sent to each man has so far 
failed to bring in more than $25 of 
this amount. The field fund needs 
the money now as never before and 
it is imperative that these pledges be 
redeemed at once. 



BOSTON 

ALUMNI DINNER 

Youngfs Hotel. 

Feb. 4 

[See Article on Page 3.] 



UPHAM '16 IS WINNER OF 
RURAL DRAMA COMPETITION 



Score— M. A. C. 8 Springfield 1. <ioa!« 

Ma.'Kelney, Ross, Wooley, Sander- 

r>n, Goal judges— Gloiosa of M. A. C. 

mi. I BrtcS Of Springfield. Keferee— 

Mil. Time— 20 minute halves, 



FRESHMAN ELECTIONS 
At a recent claw meeting, the 
Freshmen elected Ray H. Wiswell of 
N01 1 hampton manager of class hockey 
team. Paul Faxon of Wellesley Hills 
and Forest K. Montgomery of East- 
Orange, N.J., were elected to fill the 
vacancies on the class athletic board. 



His Play, "The Craftsman of the Soil," 

Awarded the Roister Doieter 

Prise of $50. 

"The Craftsman of the Soil* by T. 
Carlton Upham '16 of Fitchburg won 
the prize of $50 offered by the Uoister 
Doister for the best rural drama writ- 
ten by a student of this college. The 
judges who made the decisioo were 
Bertram Harrison, Katherine Mc- 
Dowell Bice, and Ray Standard 
Maker. 

The idea of the establishment of a 
real rural drama which would treat 
the various phases of the rural prob- 
lem in a true and sympathetic man- 
ner, portraying country life as it 
really is, waa conceived by James T. 
Nicholson *16, who originally pre- 
sented his Idea before a meetiug of 
the Collegiate Country Life Club last 
spring. The suggestion of establish- 
ing a competition to secure such a 
play met with favor and the prize of 
$A0 won by Upham was the result. 

So successful waa this first compe- 
tition that it haa been decided to 
make it an annual affair. The com- 
mittee in charge of the rural drama 
competition is composed of Prof. John 
Phelan, chairman, Dean Kdward M. 
Lewis, Prof. H. E. Smith,Prof . E. L. 
Morgan, and J. T. Nicholson. 

JOURNALI8T8 OH TRIP 
About 10 members of Professor 
Neat's class in Journalism were his 
guests at Poll's in .Springfield Satur- 
day afternoon. The men also visited 
the editorial rooms of the Springfield 
I ' n ion . 



MIDWINTER ALUMNI DAY 
ARRANGED FOR MARCH 4 

Many Aggie Men Expected Back 
For Annual Affair. 

FRATERNITY BANQUETS 

To be Held Friday Evening. Track 

Meet and Basketball Guinea on 

Saturday Program. 

Mid-winter Alumni Day Is now 
scheduled for March 3-1, and at that 
time all the old grade who can pos 
sihlv get to Amherst are inviled lo 
come bjick to Aggie while the collage 
is in full swing. A joint committee 
of the Semite and Faculty has been 
appointed to take charge of the 111- 
ra ng s iae ata. R. J. Waits *ot, is 

chairman of this committee, and 

Professor Bobbins secretary, lbs 

other iiii'IIiIhmk being Mi'. (Jore aii'l 
Dr. Patera of "he faculty and (1. B. 
Palmer 'H», L. T. Buck man *17. and 
A. W. Spnuhling *17, representing 
the student ImmU. The program fol- 
lows: 

Kiiim t\ BVKMIMS, M m;< 11 II 
Fraternity Initiation ltant|U«ti 
,V\ 11 km v^ . M m:< •• 4 
Koh-ikmiii Import km uf Departments 
2-on i\ m. iiutiliHn Track Rveoti 
s-lft c, m. Basketball same* i» unii 

Hall. 
;, mi v m. Mifpci at Draper Halt, 

7-;N> e H. Kiili'ilaililiitiil 111 I In- \ 

tortuia 

All the fraternities ha\e be« 1. 
asked lo hold their initiation haii- 
quetsou the first Friday evening in 
March. Saturday forenoon will hfl 
devoted to a general inspection of 
the various departments of the col- 
lege, all of which will he in full 0] - 
eration, in coiili'HSt to the condition 
at Commencement time. Basketball 
games and a track meet fill up the 
afternoon program, while a student 
alumni supper is the reatnreof lbs 
evening, followed by an interim 1 
ment in the Auditorium. Further 
psi titulars as to the plana foi Alumni 
Day will appear from lime to time. 



WILLIAMS GAME CANCELED 
As the warm weather spoiled the 
ice in the hockey rink, the game 
scheduled with Williams for last Sat- 
urday bad to be canceled. 



NON-ATHLETIC BOARD MEET 
INO NEXT TUESDAY 

The next meeting of the Not 
Athletic Board will he held Tuesday 
Feb. 1st, in the President's office 
Amendments to the bylaw-, concern 
ing the closing of contracts by stu- 
dent managers of non-athletic orgim 
1 Stations will he recommended for con 
sideration and discussion 



16 



a 











The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday,' Jan. 25, 1916. 



SPEAKER TELLS OF DR. 

GRENFELLS GREAT WORK 

Francis B. Sayre, Secretary to Pres- 
ident of Williams College, Gives 
Illustrated Talk at Assembly. 

Mr. Francis li. Snvre. Secretary 
to the President of William* College 
gave ■ very interesting lecture on 
Dr. (Jrenfell ami his gre.-it work in 
Labrador at Assembly Wednesday. 
The talk whs illustrated throughout 
by lantern slides. Scenes were 
shown picturing the life of these men 
of the North, their homes and fam- 
ilies. Very interesting slides also 
illustrated vividly the ravages of 
glaciers in thai country, the danger 
Caused to navigation by immense ice- 
bergs, the poverty-stricken condi- 
tions along the roast. This land is 
characterized by ice, fog and roottf 
and an atmosplieie of loneliness is 
everywhere about. Months pass 
without the sight of a sti anger, for 
thfl harbors are ice-bound except for 
a few weeks in summer. The inhab- 
itants live iu little huts along the 
coast and dogs afford die only means 
of inland travel for these men. 
Their food is ehtellv fish which they 
catch in the open mm . 

Mr. Say re also ^av»' a brief sketch 

of the great work of lb- QreofeUin 

Labrador. '*H« i-* a graduate of 
Oxford, a man of pluck, of grit, of 
ideals. He fust came from Kngland 
in 1803, That summer he sailed the 
coast of Labrador, that he might 
learn the conditions of these people. 
Finding Um inhabitants in poverty, 
with no means of combating disease 
Of of aiding theiii-»el\ es in then 
troubles, Dr. flienfell decided to 



VARSITY RELAY TEAM TO 

RUN RHODE ISLAND STATE 

Entered at Coast Artillery Meet in 
Boston, Jan. 39. W. P. I. Oppo- 
nents at B. A. A. Games. 

Coach Dickinson of the relay team 
is working hard to get the varsity 
men in condition for the first two 
races of the season, which are sched- 
uled for the next two Saturdays. 
The MA. C. team will run against 
(abode Island State at the Coast Ar- 
tillery Meet in Boston Jan. 'ill, and 
Worcester Tech will l>e the oppon- 
ents at the It. A. A. games Feb. .">. 

Tufts, against which the M. A. C. 
team has usually run at the Coast 
Artillery Meet, has no relay team 
this year, owing to the fact that their 
hoard track was used for firewood 
last fall in celebratiou of a football 
victory over Bowiloin. Uhode Is- 
land State, scheduled by Manager 
Kicker in place of Tufts, is now on 
even terms with Aggie, having lost 
to M. A. C. in HMI and won last 
year's race, promising an exciting 
race for this season. 

Worcester Tech is scheduled for 
the fifth of February, which comes 
after the first semester, making eli- 
gible a number of track men from 
the Freshman class. The following 
colleges and prep-school races are 
scheduled to run the :'>:>0 yard dis- 
tance at the H. A. A. Meet: M. A. 
0. vs. W. P. I. ; Harvard vs. Cor- 
nell ; Dartmouth vs. M. LI'.; New 
York A. C. vs. B. A. A. ; Harvard 
1919 vs. Yale L*l'.»: Andover vs. 

Exeter: Holv Croat L919 vs. Fresh- 

man fours of Dartmouth and M. L 
T. The race between Bowdoin, 
give his life to their cause. ( >f his Hates, Maine and Colby for the 
results we well know. Where he Maine State Championship will also 
formerly had one hospital now there he staged at this time. Over the 
are six. He lias nurses and helpers 780 van I distance Harvard meets 
who devote their whole time to the y : ,|». U nd Dartmouth is matched 



third prizes, and also displayed the 
best pair and best single rooster. E. 
D. Waid of Amherst won four pre- 
miums. Student winners were II. T. 
Whitney '16, first for pair of roasters, 
pair of lihode Island Reds, and best 
individual bird; A. E. Topham '16 
first for capous ; W. E, Ryan 'lfi, R. 
W. Heuninger '1G and H. T. Cald- 
well MG. 



"UNDER COVER" TO HAVE 

NEW IDEA IN SCENERY 

Final preparations for the Prom 
Show have been made and all indica- 
tions point to "UnderCover" as being 
the best show which the Roister 
Doisters have ever presented. The 
entire play is to be the work of the 
members of the dramatic society 
even to the painting of the scenery. 
The scenery promises to be one of 
the most interesting parts of the play 
as it is being built along the Hues of 
the "New Theater" style. Manager 
Nicholson in adopting this style has 
improved upou it as he has designed 
a set of screens which are very in- 
expensive and which through the 
use of electrical effects and shifts 
makes possible the staging of this 
entire production with but one set of 
scenery. This one set, by his 
method, is used to represent three 
different sets each looking entirely 
different and in no way detracting 
from the play. Manager Nicholson 
in speakiug of bis idea said, ■■In 
using this idea of scenery, we are 
attempting to demousti ate to amateurs 
and especially the dramatic societies 
of rural communities just how simple it 
is to stage even shows of the type of 
I'nder Cover*. If this type of 
scenery proves successful, the bug- 
bear of the amateur Thespian will be 
driven awav." 



welfare of these people, care for 
them, teach them the way* of more 
cultivated lands. F.verv summer Dr. 
(Irenfell sails up the coast of Labra- 
dor, and there on the deck of his 
ship administers help to the many 
patient* who come to him in boats 
from the shore. Some he heals in a 
few dn\*. others he sends to one of 
his hospitals for further treatment. 
In this way Di. Creufell is doing 
great good to his friends of the 
North and much of their happiness 
is due to his sacrifices, his kindness, 
his work. 



against Syracuse. 



FRESHMAN DEBATING TEAM 
The following men have been 
chosen to comprise the Freshman 
Debating team: S. C. Bartlett, Jr. 
of Brookbne. C. L Chase of Melrose 
and W. A. Hathaway, captain, of 
Taunton. The team will debate 
agamst the Brown and William* 
Freshmen some time daring the tec- 
ond semester. 

*0S.— Harvey D. Crosby ia now 

engaged In the moth suppression 
work in Princeton 



NOVEL POULTRY SHOW 

ATTRACTS ATTENTION 

Several Students Win Prizes at First 
Annual Dressed Market Poul- 
try Show. Jan. 21-22. 

The first annual exhibit of dressed 
market poultry, held .Ian. 21 t$ in 
Stockbridge hall, brought out a most 
promising display of roasters, capons, 
fowl, and fryers. Tile exhibitors 
were boys' and girls' clubs, college 
students, fanners, commercial men. 
ami butchers. The exhibits were 
judged by W. T. McDermott of 
Faiieuil Hall Market, Boston. 

Friday afternoon interesting demon 
itrations were given by Alfred Luon 
of Ifee poultry department on killing 
and picking, by Payne in trussing 
and boning, The feature .Saturday 
was a student dry picking contest for 
the Mullen trophy, won by Raymond 
H. Mooney *18. * 

The sweepstakes premium waa 
awarded to K. (). Damon of North 
Hanover, who took first, second, and 



RIFLE TEAM SHOOTS 

FOR EVEN THOUSAND 

Ten Man Score of 1005 Probably 

Sets New Record Against 

Iowa 8tate. 

In last week's match against Iowa 
State the M. A. C. rifle team scored 
the possible thousand for the first 
five men, while the second five are 
credited with 199 each. This makes 
a team score of 1995, which is prob- 
ably a record-breaker. 

The five man score : 



Clapp. 


200 


Canlett, 


MM) 


Raymond. 


200 


Tuthill. 


200 


l'hipps. 


200 




100(1 



NOTICE 
Tickets for the Prom show will go 
on sale Monday, Jan. 31, in the Y. 
M. C. A. offlce at 12-30 e. u. Since 
the number of tickets is limited this 
year, It will be advisable to get aeats 
at your earliest opportunity. 

J. T. Nicholson. 



FACULTY SHOW CAUSES 

GREAT COMPLICATIONS 

State Department Alarmed at Recen 
Developments. Polander Fig- 
ures in the Case. 

International difficulties of at 
acute nature have followed the pul> 
lication in last week's Cotucoua of 
cablegrams from abroad. World 
wide interest is now aroused in the 
coming Faculty Show (Stockbridgi 
Hall, Jan. 29). Our local editorial 
office, as well as our bureaus in Pari. 
and London have been besieged for 
further particulars. 

Great Britain in particular has 
made a strong protest. The cor- 
respondence, piinted in the Collki. 
ian, between the Kaiser and his 
friend Professor Waugh is dc 
nounced as a grave breach of neu- 
trality. This telegram was received 
by wireless via Sayville, but as the 
Sayville station has been taken over 
by the United States government and 
neutralized under the direction of 
Great Britaiu it is easy to see how 
these complications would arise. It 
is understood that President Wilson 
is now writing a note to King George 
on the subject of Ameiican neu- 
trality. 

Meantime Russia has been heaid 
from. The Czar has sent the follow- 
ing despatch to Secretary Watts of 
the Social Uuion : 
tjl'Ixe/.Ui pvx.js ZsZxeki 

Rdggqzx tX utumzz (jfioo ^vaizky 
zk Vodka prehiiski ooozoo sky sczky 

Nikilofski 

This despatch has been translated 
by one of the iutelligaut Polanders 
iu the Horticultural Division who 
was formerly a lierraan spy in ft 
sausage factory in Warsaw. In 
plain United States it reads as fol- 
lows : 

Imikkiai. Higiinksm Watts, 
Amherst. 

Well Beloved Brother:— .V 
soon as your Social Union can spare 
the unsparable ami incomparable ag- 
gregation of wit and beauty organ- 
ize as the Faculty Show we beg you 
will send them to ue. The fame of 
your Honorable Forlmsh Iihs already 

reached us. 

Always yours, 

Nikolas 

Meanwhile complications h*W 
arisen on another horizon. It hai 
been ascertained that Fmperor Fran/ 
.loseph ban been trying to get in 
touch with his Teutonic friend hi 
Amherst. Urgent despatches « 
filed for delivery via Amsteni 
but as Holland is a neutral conn 
and therefore under control by 
British, transmission waa refuse 
At this junction Professor If* 
applied to Secretary of State I 
sing who immediately cabled I 
Gray aa follows : 

JSabl Gbry, 
London. 

Sir! We understand '' 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 25, 1916. 



It'tained important messages in Am- 
sterdftR) intended for one <>f our dis- 

inguitbed American citizens. Pro- 
cessor Waugh of Amherst and musi- 
cal director of the Faculty Show. 

This is a plain invasion of our neu- 
tral rights; and inasmuch u the Fac- 
ulty Show has important engagements 
pending in all the capitals of Kurope. 
this action tends to interfere with 
legimate business. Please give this 
yoor immediate attention. 

L&KstNQ. 

.lust as we go to press word is re- 
i-eived that Karl Grey'i reply has 
been cabled to Washington. The 
Coi.ikoiax correspondent in London 
says that it is a very stiff and per- 
emptory refusal of Secretary Lan- 
sing's demand, based on the follow- 
ing principles :( 1 )Thc Faculty Show, 
were it to be given in Berlin or 
Vienna, would put new life into the 
Teutonic allies. It is therefore con- 
trary to military necessity. (2)Thal 
Professor I^oekwood's vaudeville 
jokes have not been censored aud 
theiefore cannot be allowed to pass. 
(8) That Professor Waugh is one- 
half German aud should be interned. 
I i That neutrals have no rights 
anvwav. 



your government haa unwarrantai 



REV. R S. FORBES GIVES 

SUNDAY CHAPEL ADDRESS 

Compulsion, Comprehension und Co-nj - 

er.ition M lin Points Emphasized 
by Dorchester Clergyman, 

"Compulsion, comprehension mid 
co-operation" was the subject taken 
by Rev. Roger S. Forbes of Dorches- 
ter for his sermon in Sunday chapel. 

'•There i* a definite progression in 
these three words." henaid "Compre- 
hension is belter than compulsion, 
and co-operation is bigger and finer 
than comprehension." Compulsion 
l-l:i\s a great part iu the life of 
every human. All of the great ini- 
I'lovcmeuts to humanity have been 
i a d and there is some truth in the 
philosophy that if we rub ag:iinst the 
-limp edges of necessity occasionally 
good will come of it. 

People are gradually comprehend- 
that only as causes are changed 
l in troubles be analyzed and the 
Is of evil laid hare. Thirty years 
li go New York was a maze, where 

I l;iy all is older simply because tin- 

lie expert found a cause. 
I'he progress of mankind onward 
Upward is forever nil unless wc 
k shoulder to shoulder. Although 
led from the fear of Judgment 
we cMimot be real Christians if 
sing hymns of the life lo be and 
i«« the tores of the present day- 
are eatirg into the heart of the 

o||. 

If we would not be disappointed In 
let US remember that Cod minus i 
is not God, but only God minus: 
The world will never 1« saved ; 
te meant to save it until each 

II .li can stand before God. perfect 
unafraid, with no man a tyrant 

i no man a slave* 



PROM DECORATIONS 

IN BLACK AND WHITE 

Pleasing Scheme Worked Out On Lat- 
est French Ideas. Will Allow 
More Dancing Space. 

For those who are interested, the 
Prom Committee has a word about 
the scheme of decorations for the 
affair. The entire scheme is in black 
and white, the latest French idea. 
The ceiling aud four walls will be in 
alternate black and white stripes. 
each stripe of such a width that the 
hall will look large and airy. The 
general effect is rather striking, hut 
very pleasing and satisfactory This 
same idea of black and white is 
carried out in the other decorations 
as far as is possible, yet not so much 
that it becomes tiresome. 

The dancing space will be enclosed 
by a lattice-work fence with numerous 
wide openings, go arranged that there 
will be no inconvenience from crowd- 
ing at the Informal Saturday. Kach 
section of the fence will be Hanked 
by two posts, which also mark the 
openings admitting to the dancing 
Moor. A curve at the north end of 
the hull will enclose the best combi- 
nation of rag-picking musicians ever 
heard on this campus, and the patro- 
nesses will received at the othei end. 
as at Infoi mala. 

Kach poet, more than two dozen in 
all, will support a dulled light, aud n 
large chandelier in the middle of the 
ceiling will complete the lighting 
scheme. All four corners of the 
room will be made into cozy cornels 
Numerous greens aud potted plants 
will enter into the general plan in 
such a way as to dress off the rough 
edges and give a cozy effect. 



FENCING TEAM NOW HAS 

FOURTEEN CANDIDATES 

Professor Andrnud of Springfield Col- 
lege Giving Weekly Instruction. 

Meets to be Arranged 
Fourteen men are now practicing 
fencing under the instruction of Pro- 
feaaor Andrnud of Springfield Y. M. 
C. A. College. 

A nucleus of four men remain 
from last year and with the new 
material Coach Andrnud expects to 
turn out a team capable of holding 
its own against the experienced team 
off Springfield. Atnfceraf College has 
a class developing thin year and it 
is hoped meets can be arranged with 
them. 

Professor A ndraud is in Amherst 
every Friday afternoon wheu he gives 
two lessons. On Tuesday the pre- 
ceding lesson is practiced by the in- 
dividual members of the club. The 
cost of instruction is remarkably rea- 
sonable, SO lesson being given for $•"> 
which is one-third the usual price. 

As a coach at Cornell Professor 
Andratid turned out several intercol- 
legiate champion teams, and he is 
highly recommended by Springfield. 
Meets with the latter college will 
probably be arranged for this spring. 



and the class will continue work 
until Faster. 

There has been no formal meeting 
of the club as yet but Thayer '17, 
manager pro tetn will call in the near 
future a meeting of the club for elec- 
tion of officers and the adoption of l 
definite policy for the season. 



BOSTON ALUMNI DINNER 

Ten years ago this month "Prexy" 
Butterfield made his first appearance 
as an Aggie man at the Boston din- 
ner. This year's reunion is planned 
as a special tribute to "Prexy" — an 
expression of appieciatiou for his 
work during these ten years and a 
pledge of alumni backing in the 
larger work of the future. 

There will be other worth-while 
features : 

Sumner R. Parker '04, now back 
at Aggie, will speak. Parker is an 
enthusiast — you'll want to hear him. 

Willard Scott of Hrookline, known 
as a humorist, an after-dinner speak- 
er always in demand at live gather- 
ings, will talk on "The Best Man in 
Town." 

The music has been arranged ho 
that every man can take part- our 
music is always a feature. 

A big, live meeting iu every way. 
0oe hundred and fifty are expected — 
.'500 wanted 

Youngs Hotel. Boston, at <l o'clock, 

on Friday, Feb. 4. 



CONCERT AT HOLYOKE 

The Combined Clee Chilis gave a 
concert and dance last Friday night 
under the auspices of the Holvoke 
High School Athletic Association in 
the high school hall. From 600 to 
(SOU people heard the concert, which 
was up to the usual Standard. Fol- 



lowii 



the concert dancing was en- 



joyed by all in the gymnasium of the 
high school, 

Aa i -|>, mill, Uood ConnkiMii Preposition- 

Cash lor trst urdi-rs -Article wielelj Aelvt-rlist a— 

Cut* (liiwii i*?o rust- in | i «•• 

l''Ni.1Nl-l- lONi. s, ,. ,. | ^ Co., 

Phlladvlpbm I'a. 



i lanls- Addrvti 
N "<tli Street, 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

j jobbers r»f Wrought trim and Brtfl I'i|.e, V»lve» 
I »nd Kitting* for Steam. Watei and dav \sliesOn 
I and Magnesia H01W1 ami I'iit Covering*, r"ip# 
j Cut to sketch. Mill Sttpi<lle| Kngir e«*t* :ind 
Contractor! for Steam and Hut \\ ;i t»»f Hf'iitniK, 
XiitoiualH ** |»r t rik If r Sytlrins, Hoi ler arid Er}Rtre 
; Connections. Hulyokr, Ma»a. 

HKCKMAN'8 

Candies and Ice Cream 



*• 1 1 \ \i i 



"BIDE-A-WEE 



n 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

OBI specialty — And pttwi good thing! to eat. 

MRS. L. M. STF.BBINS, 

Middle Street, Hartley, Mans. 

Tel, 4M 1 

ftotel Ularren 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T. U. AHCRN, MANAGER 



T\ y n are supplied every year 

Burpee s deeds MK«ta nW KAmm- 

I can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, a bright new book of 1 H2 pages, which 
is reco|piiz«d as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Addre 



ess 



W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Building*, Philadelphia 



■SEmMH 



Pa c:g 



9 w 



hoe 



t ore 



Largt.st .Sunk — Lowest Pricts 

IC^IX.*!"! IxN'li.iiiino IteMt li'tltllt'l' IINl'll 



School and College Photographers . . . 

LOCALLY: 5a Center St.. Northampton. Mass., 

end South Hadley, Mass 



Main Orricfc; 

1 5461 54H Kruadway. 

New York City 



The«e .Studios ».tirr (he li<-*t skilled 

tiirsts and most complete 

t-quiptni m obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



1 

i 

1 

. 1 



■IJP.ALRRS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



The Masrachusette Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 25, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 25, 1916. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS C0LLE61AN 

Publfsfeed SWJ Tuesday evening 
by the Students <>f tbe MasHacbu- 
Hctis Agricultural College. 



BOABD OF EDITORS. 

TYl.KK s, itor.KHS '16, Edltor-ln-Chlef 

RICHARD W SMITH "17. Ma nftRlwt Editor 

KHAMv .1. srllKIKKI.K'lfi. AwUsUnt EdltOI 
THUS. I., it A Kill M KS'lfi. 
M.HCKI> A.HlOloSA ML, 
IIWHIIIT I" I'.AKNKS'IV,, 

MILFOROB. I.AWKKNcK'l 



FIRST HALF OF SERIES 

ENDS IN TRIPLE TIE 



Athletic Editor 

Athlftic Editor 

Alumni Editor 

Sewn Editor 



Freshman Basketball Players Romp 

Away with Sophomores, 30-13. 

Juniors Win from Seniors. 



ONLY FORTY MEN HAVE 

BOUGHT PROM PRELIMS 



II I K»T HBNDERBOS '17, l>e|«rtuient Editor 
WILLIAM SAVll.l.K.. .lit- IT. •'mil pan Editor 
MARSHALL O. UN I'll EA 14 'IK. A»«o'« Editor 



BUS1 N Eflfl 1 >K1' A HTM KNT. 

ciui.A.iro«itw«to».J» : jm 

ltiiHln«8S Manager 

MKKKII.I. IV WAKNKK '«. „„„„ 

Assistant Huilneas Manager 

I.K8TKUK. KIEI.IHNii IS, 

Advertising Manager 

JAMES r.l-OWEI.I.-IH. I inolatlon 

Subscription II .M PC* year. 8in(jle 
eopu»,feMta. Beta »» "> r,lers »' aya " 
hie to Ciiaki.ks A. HirsriNOTON, Jh. 

Entered a. seonnd-laM matter sUSs An.herat 
Past (Mies. 



Vol. XXVI. Tuesday. Jan. 25. No. 16 



win QUIT BOH 1 

Kver since Alumni Field was 
opened Inst fall men liave been ask- 
ing. When are tbey going to build the 
cinder track ? Now Professor Hicks 
conies back trith tbe queston. When 
in yon going to build it? Aggie 

mm back ia 1914 put la 800 hours 

of hard work building the drains for 
that field and they didn't quit until 
the drains were laid. Now the field 

Ima a good baseball diamond sod a 
good football field with a real wire 
feme around it. Hut it is not com- 
plete and will not be until the track 
tc:im ban a place to practice. 

IVw men aside from the candidates 
for 'vaisitv track know the handicap 
M A. C i» under for lack of track 
facilities. We are members of the 
M |, | A. A. and vet never even 
Ik.n. had a decent hundred yards on 
out own campus for practice. Ill 
fact, but for the courtesy of Amherst 
( , , liege in allowing us to use their field 
we couldn't have any track team at 
all. Imagine the enthusiasm of 
going out for track when it menus 
practice .very afternoon a mile from 
ih. ( ampus on the field of a rival 
institution. It bat meant sacrifice 
for a man toiunon the M. A. V. 
track team and* it is bigh time the 
sacrifice was a linle more evenly dis- 
tributed among the student body. 
Tbis is no time to quit. If we have 
„ nv MOM of college loyalty, if we 
have an> sense of pride, we will not 
continue to ask favors of a sister 
college when we can just as well take 
care of ourselves We have no 
money to bnild the track but we have 
a student body made up of men who 
are not afraid of blistering their 
hands on a ahovel . The field is there 
and can be completed only if we do 
the work ourselves. If we are half 
as willing as the men of two years 
■go. the job will be finished ; if we 
don't liniBb the job we ought to be 
ashamed to show our heads as Aggie 
men. Why quit now? 



Speed proved to be the outstand- 
ing characteristic and the deciding 
factor in the third series of iuterclass 
basketball games in which the 
Juniors defeated the Seniors, and 
the Freshmen romped away from the 
much heralded Sophomore five. 
The results of these games leave 
three teams tied for first place, while 
the Seniors bring up the rear with a 
total of three games lost. 

1917-21; 1916-13 
The opening game started off with 
a rush in which speed and hard play- 
ing were at a premium but during 
the whole of which many much 
needed points were lost bv both sides 
as a result of poor shooting. The 
Seniors were especially at fault in 
the latter department of the game 
and although they continually pep- 
pered the 1917 basket Perry and 
Darling were the only ones able to 
score. At the end of the first half 
the score stood 5-4 in favor of 1916, 
but the Juniors started a great come- 
back rush which clinched the game, 
K. Grayson being the particular star 
although Day played well as defen- 
sive guard. 

1919-30; 1918-18 
With the best exhibition of accur- 
ate shooting and passing that has 
been seen in the Drill Hall this year 
the Freshmen ran away from the 
Sophomores and led at the end of 
the first half 13-1. After Pond had 
scored a pretty basket in the first 10 
seconds of play, the Sophomores 
seemed to lose heart, the Freshmen 
scoring at will. MacCarthy and 
Pond gave a rare demonstration of 
basket throwing, caging goals from 
all parts of the floor, while Parkhurst 
more than covered his man and was 
all over the floor. For the Sopho- 
mores F. Grayson and Sedge wick 
played well, but frequent fouling 
marred their work. 
The scores : 



Showing of Juniors Disappointment 
to Committee. Class Affair in 

Need of Better Support. 
Just an even 40 men have signified 
their intention of attending tbe Junior 
prcfra Friday night, Feb. 1 1 These 
figures are based on the sale of 
"prelims" and may be lowered. 

On the whole, this showing was a 
disappointment to the committee, 
who realized that the Seniors were 
going to support the prom well, and 
hoped for at least a fair attendance 
from the Junior class, to say nothing 
of the two lower classes. The short 
course students are making a better 
showing than the Sophomoies and 
Freshmen combined. To date, the 
Juniors have been a disappointment. 
They do not seem to realize that the 
prom is their own, their biggeBt Bocial 
time in college. There are 20 Sen- 
iors going, and only 11 Juniors, but 
the committee hopes that these figures 
will be raised in a week. The Fresh- 
men seemed to have a stage fright, 
and not one of their number has 
made any advances. For the past 
two or three years, there have always 
been at least two Freshmen at the 
prom. It might be a good idea for 
the class as a whole to send a couple 
of delegates to the big Junior affair. 
The committee wishes to announce 
that the time of arrival for the girls 
is Friday uooo and Sunday noon the 
date of departure. Also, that un- 
chaperoned sleigh rides at eight 
should not be encouraged. 



meeting several of the committee 
will speak and the Btudeut point of 
view will be ably presented by some 
of the best speakers in the student 
body. 



CAMPUS NOTE 
The M. A. C. goal tender, who 
happens to major in poultry, had a 
unique experience Saturday at the 
poultry show. The bird he had just 
finished picking got up and walked 
off, to the astonishment of the would- 
be poultry expert. Poor aim is as- 
signed as the reason why the chick 
came back to life. 



We invite you 



To examine our stock, 
To consider our motives. 
To try oar prices. 

We have the latest and best books; 
we can get you any book this side of 
Germany. Give us a chance and you'll 
be satisfied Our prices are the same as 
at the treasurer's office; if we stick you, 
don't shri.-k; you saw us coming. 

R. A. Mooney H. W. Bishop 



JOHNSON BOOK CO. 

85 Pleasant Street. 



MIDYEARS PREVENT 

GAME WITH TRINITY 



WHIuH WILL YOU BUY 

A "cream thief" or 



<« 



HOT 

Irvine, If, 
.squire.*, rf, 
K.I Jra> son ,«•, 
I lay. In 



Wirt 
r K«t r 

II II II rjr, Moses, 
1 I 1«, Hall, 
'i 6 tt e, l'ertv . 

■j. 4 rf. Darling, 



llaKelsleln.ru.O II If, Kituf, 



r ko e 
<) 


3 6 11 

1 tt 




•21 Lt 

1919 tUt. 

v ko e r rt* r 

MacCarthy. If. «1 12 If, Uasser. 
Pond, 

Crowe, rf, ft 4 14 l K . Sedgwick, I 4 
Wood ,1 'oiid, c, 2 4 c, K. Grayson. 

Ilawley. 1 1 4 
Williams, lg. u u rf, Vicktrs. 1 l :< 
Parkhurst.rb.n If, Hawley, 

K. (Jrayson, 1 I 



Hockey Management May Arrange 
Contest In February. Springfield 
At Springfield Mast Ob Schedule. 
Because of the final examination 
period at Trinity the hockey game 
pending with that college has been 
indefinitely postponed, but will prob- 
ably be arranged to be played ob the 
M. A. C. risk sometime next semes- 
ter. Although Trinity is represented 
by a mediocre team the game is ex- 
pected to prove at least interesting. 
February 5tb is the date of the 
next game on the schedule, to be 
played at Springfield. If eligible, 
several freshmen are likely to appear 
in the varsity lineup and with a 
stronger team than before, results are 
expected. 



Cream Separator ? 



A CREAM SEPARATOR IS used 
twice a day, 730 times a year, and if 
it wastes a little cream every time 
you use it it's a "cream thief", and 
an expensive machine even if yea 
got it as a gift. 

BUT IF IT SKIMS CLEAN TO 
the one or two hundredths of one 
per cent, as thousands and thou- 
sands of tests with a Babcock Tester 
show the De Laval does, then it's a 
cream saver, and the most profitable 
machine or implement on the farm 
—a real "savings bank" for its 
fortunate owner. 

THE MOST PROFITABLE ma 
chine 00 the fsom is a De Laval 
Cream Separator. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

Iff. llromlway N«w York 

39 K. Mmllaun St.. Ctitcaf" 






an 18 

Free tries mtased — K, Grayson 6, 

Perry fl. Pond 7,Vlckers7, F. Grayson 2, 
Keferee -Mann of Springfield ; Timer— 

Hicks of M. A. 0.1 Scorer - Uoldsn : 

Time. 20 minute halves, 



AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE 

TO VISIT THE COLLEGE 

Special Assembly Called for Thursday 
Afternoon at 4-30 
The Legislative Committee on Ag- 
riculture will visit the college on 
Wednesday and Thursday of this 
week to look over the needs of the 
institution as they are bow recom- 
mended for the action of the Legis- 
lature. All students are expected to 
attend a special mass meeting Thurs- 
day afternoon at 4-30. At tUs 



UNITY OHUBOH 

NOSTM PLEASAtlT ST. 

A Church home of the liberal Fait" 
where every student will meet 
with a cordial welcome, 

kki.i 1 A K atTM DAT BKBTICa AT T P « 



< 



LOW PR1CC TAILORING 
SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
Saiti Cleaiiea, Pleased *»J Df«d. AH kled 

ctoac^ , K , OTO^TZ,Pso, 

M m^wa fte ^P^ol^. Titt-v 



PRESIDENTS RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE 
LEGISLATURE STATE IMPERATIVE NEEDS 



NEW LIBRARY CHIEF ITEM IN BUDGET 



Five Year Appropriation Again Asked For to Provide More New Buildings. 
Student Dormitory on List for Sixth Time. 



BUDGET OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 




A8 PRESENTED TO THE LEGISLATURE 


Completion of Power Plant, 


8 85,000 


Library, 


230,000 


Completion of Rural Engineering Shops, 


12.000 


Student Dormitory, 


40,000 


Miscellaneous Improvements and New Equipment, 


(50,000 


Extra Labor on account of Saturday Half Holiday 
Total, 


5,000 


$382,000 



In submitting hi* report of recom- 
mendations to the incoming legisla- 
lure, President Hutlei field hns enum- 
erated only the most urgent needs of 
the college. He takes them up in 
detail nnd the following repoit ex- 
plains fully what is being asked for 
this year. 

Addition To The Power Plant 
$35,000. 

Our request of a year ago was for 
so appropriation of $ 30,000 to enlarge 
ami further equip the power plant. 
The legislature made a grant of 
$lo,iioo for this put pose. With thta 
money it was possible to extend the 
l»oiler room and to install one new 
NO II. I\ boiler. Hut new buildings 
mean new demands on both heat and 
light. Tbe electiical load isw little 
over 400 k. w. ; the generators are 
rated at 150 k. w. It is imperative 
therefore that we increase our electri- 
cal equipment as sooo as possible. 
To do this it will be necessary to 
build a building 40x60 feet, directly 
north of the boiler room, with full 
equipment. One new boiler should 
be added as a reserve. These im- 
provements will cost $35,000, the 
details being ss follows : 
One 40x60 Brick Building $ 10,0110 
One S00 k. w. Generator and 

Turbine, 7,800 

One Switch Board, 2,000 

Piping and Labor for install- 
ing electrical Equipment 2,500 
One 200 P. P. Boiler, 4 ,000 

Retaining Wall and Platform 

for Coal Pocket, I,t08 

<>r>« Chimney, 4,5oO 

Library Building »230,000. 

In 1902 the late President II. II. 

i*-ll, in submitting his annual 

rtpc n to the Trustees, said : 

mr library building is full to 
»V) owing nnd those books not in 
■eti circulation are being withdrawn 
lad iled upon tbe floor or on the top 
of ( cases. It now numbers 28,6«I 
T o! i«s, A new building properly 
^tt ped cannot be long delayed." 

A the time that President Ooodell 
mt < . the enrolment of regular stu- 
rteo was 180 j the enrolment of win- 



ter course students 16; making a 
total maximum of 196 students who 
used the library. 

Again, in lUO.'i. President (>oodell 
wrote : 

"The library has entirely outgrown 
its building. Twenty-eight hundred 
volumes have been withdrawn from 
circulation. Another building, fire- 
proof, with stackroom and all the 
adjuncts that add so much to tbe ser- 
viceableness of a modern library, is 
imperatively demanded." 

At this time the enrolment of four- 
year men was 285 ; of winter course 
students 28 : making a total of 203 
studen s who used the library 

At a time when there were less thsn 
twenty-five thousand volumes in tbe 
library, ami only 100 students, there 
was a strong feeling on tbe psrt of 
the administration tbat a new library 
building was needed. How mncli 
more is a new building needed after 
tbe Ispae of thirteen years, we still 
have almost the same library facili- 
ties, hut with nearly 50,000 volumes, 
or twice tbe number of books, and 
with 850 students, or over four times 
as many students; 

The librarian, who has gone to the 
limit of bis patience, suggests that tbe 
climbing of stepladders, the search 
for an unoccupied chair, and the 
squirming through crowded aisles 
necessarily detracts greatly from ser- 
ious study. It is hardly putting the 
case too strongly to say tbat we do 
not have respectable library accom- 
modations. It must De remembered 
that the library is the vital intellectual 
center of college life. The library 
fosters every department of the col- 
lege. It ia a sort of bub of a wheel 
which securely holds every spoke ; or, 
to change the figure, every depart- 
ment has its roots firmly planted In 
the college library. The library ia 
the big general laboratory of the in- 
stitution. It is difficult to measure 
tbe 1ms from poor library facilities, 
for there are no standards. But it 
i equires no argument to convince eves 
the casual visitor to our library that 
we are seriously handicapped st every 
tarn because of tbis deplorable lack 



CAMPION 



Fine Tailoring 



COLLEGE OUTFITTER 



Ready-To- Wear Clothes 



F. A SHERARD 

ME N'S STO RE 

Use Our New Cash Discount Card and Save Five Per Cent 

— OH — 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 

Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see yon. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



BIG BARGAINS 

in our 

Semi - Annual dean -Up Sale 

— of— 

Pipes, Tobacco and 

SMOKERS' NECESSITIES 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

Tie Kexall Store— On the Corner 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 25, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 25, 1916. 



J. GINSBU 

ii i-a Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

75c Special Half Sole, Rubber 75c 

WIM'AIWIXC 

Black, Tan, White Work Guaranteed. 

i • i-* i «. - 1 •: .«•* 

Rubber Soles • IR0 

Rubber Soles, with Heels . . 01.75 

Soles Sewed, ...... ™ c 

33 Shines for SI.OO 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 9 to is A. M., 1-30 '° S '• «• 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

GROUPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work speaks for itself. 

NASH BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone W— R 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 
Winijows, Lead Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN ft DYER, Props. 

Loose-Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
— Pens— 



K.-i»m i.«rr. IM»2 

Stkphen Lank Foi\.okr 

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1HO BROADWAY. NEW YOKK 

OL.TJIJ ANI> COT^IjKtiK 
PINS AM) RIN«iH .* 

l.M.O. -.11 «•-•» IN" UWOXy.K MHOAI.M 



HOW ABOUT A NEW SUIT ? 



Select it today. The new styles in Autumn and Winter patterns await 
your inspection. You will want a stylish, comfoitible SUIT or OVER- 
COAT. Step in and examine our line. St>le is the addition to the latest 
fashion, to your individual need. Custom clothes are designed for Y<H'. 
not simply cut to fit the stocky sized man. Our Gents' Furnishings Line is of 

The Latest Goods in Shirts and Collars 
Kid Gloves, all styles New Dress Vests at very reasonable prices 



ALL KINDS OK RKPAlK WORK NEAII.Y AND PKOMITI.V RON* 



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Custom Tailor 



11 AMITY ST. 



WAR AND POTASH 

War is titling on the lid of the German Fotash Barrel-The American Farmei hah 
lo bo without it in 1916-Yet i 9 i6wtll be the year of hi K ««t uric™ lor but .crops, 
and should he the year of biggest crops for his Iwiu-fit. What » the answer? 

The Potash Is In your Soil 5tart It working ! 
Nitrogen and Phosphoric Acid will do it. They will produce plants sufficiently 
strong and vigorous to help themselves to the inactive Potash now latent in your soil 

jitittT^ Hubbard's Bone Base Fertilizers 



0B»*» 






^^TitllE^ 



contain the nitrogen and phosphoric acid in right per- 
centages for whatever crops you want to raise. 




OCKM'K 
MliltllHiown.ronn. 



THE ROGERS j HUBBARD COMPANY , 



WORK* 

'•irllHIHl. I dim. 



copley square: hotel 

Huntington Ave., Exeter and Biagden Sts., Boston, Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city, 

AMOS H. WHIPPLE f»ROS*. 



(arptrvtsr & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No. 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, M 



of an adequate library building. 

The present plans contemplate a 
modern fireproof building, with facil- 
ities that can be ultimately developed 
to care for 800,000 volumes and an 
institution of 2,000 students. It is 
also arranged so that the structure 
can be considerably enlarged when in 
the course of time demands upon the 
library cannot be met by the building 
which we desire to erect now. 
Rural Engineering Shop— $12,000. 
The Rural Engineering department 
is at present offering courses in farm 
structures, machinery, and farm 
motors. The drafting room in Stock - 
hrihge hall gives good accommoda- 
tions for planning buildings and di aw- 
ing plans, but we liave DO facilities 
for giving practical instruction on the 
erection of buildings. We have no 
means for giving even the rudimen- 
tary training in the handling of the 
saw, plane, or hammer. Work OS 
farm structures will lack the practical 
training in carpentry until we secure 
additional shop space and shop equip- 
ment. Laboratory work in faun 
machinery and farm motors is now 
given in three buildings, namely, 
Stockbridge hall, Flint Laboratory, 
and the Rural Engineering building. 
This has been found necessary from 
the fact that not one of the rooms 
available is large enough or suitable 
to accommodate all the equipment. 
The class work cannot be carried on 
most advantageously umlei the con- 
ditions The situation will be im- 
proved only when we secure the addi- 
tion called for in this project. 

Student Dormitory $40,000. 
Foi six years in succession your 
Hoard has asked the Legislature for 

an appropriation with which to build 
a dormitory. I took occasion ill my 

report last year to present thi* mat- 
ter as definitely and cogently as pos- 
sible. 1 COUkl do no more now lhan 
to reiterate the arguments that hart 

been made repeatedly. I still feel, 

as I judge your Hoard feels, that this 
is an important need. I am very 
sur. that if the students were asked 
to vote on the greatest need of the 
institution at this time from the 
standpoint of physical plant, there 
would be a great majority la favor of 
a dormitory system. The matter is 
getting serious and I hope the legis- 
lature may Me its way to an nppto- 
pi lation for this purpose. 

Miscellaneous Improvements and 

Equipment— #00,000. 
This sum is needed to make it poe- 
sible for us to undertake certain pro- 
jects of improvements on the campus, 
snob foresample as the construction 
of suitable walks and roads, minor 
changes in buildings in order to bring 
the present facilities up to the grow- 
ing demands made u|>on them. New 
equipment is needed to meet the in- 
creased demands made upon the insti- 
tution by the larger attendance. Old 
equipment also is to be replaced. A 
list of some fifty separate projects for 
equipment hare been approved by 



our Committee on Buildings at, 
Grounds. It must be remerabere 
that for two successive years the L«f 
islature has made inadequate provt 
ion for these developments ; nee< 
therefore have been accumulating. 

Extra Labor On Account Of Saturda 
Half Holiday- s5,000. 

Chapter 288 of the general Acts of 
1915 provided that the provisions of 
Chapter 688 of 1914 and amendment 
thereof, relative to making Saturda, 
a half-holiday for laborers, workmen 
and mechanics, shall apply to the 
Massachusetts Agricultural college. 
This Act took effect May 27, 1915. 
The cost of labor for the year 1114 
was approximately $50,000. Since 
that time two new groups of build- 
ings have been added to our campus, 
It is safe to estimate that the addi- 
tional cost of laoor will be in the 
neighborhood of $5,000. It will be 
understood that this is an extra draft 
upon the current resources of the in- 
stitution not anticipated when the five 
year appropriation was adopted two 
years ago. 

A Five- Year Appropriation. 
Two years ago the Legislature 
passed a law granting the college s 
progressively increasing appropria- 
tion for maintenance, for a period of 
five years. At that time it was ex- 
pected that a similar grant would he 
made for improvements, including 
new buildings, miscellaneous improve- 
ments, purchase of laud. Hut that 
was done ; last year the Trustee* 
asketl for a six-year appropriation 
for this purpose. The Committee os 
Agriculture cordially approved the 
plan, changing it to five years. The 
report however, was not agreed to Nj 
the Horse Committee on Ways Itttl 
Means. This year your Board has 
voted to ask the legislature for a five- 
year appropriation of $20<),00<l u> 
cover new buildings, improvements, 
new equipment, and alto for the pur- 
of land. 



COUNTY LEAGUE CHOOSES 

ORIOOS ASST. SECRETARY 
PVed I) Griggs of Cbicopee Fslh, 
.-.lit or and manager of the Cm 
league Adoimr , has been ippointetl 
assistant secretary of the Hampden 
County Improvement League. The 
enthusiastic and intelligent resp< 
of the county farmers to the effort* 
of the officials of the league h»% 
made this increase in the staff si 
anry- The coming of the Baal 
States Exposition, a project fost 
by the league, and the scheduling of 
the National Dairy Show in Spi - 
field have also done much to inei - 
the work of the organization, I 
these arc interdependent with 
interests of the improvement as- 
ation. The league is therefore I 
ing forward to a busy and MOSS 
year, Mr. Griggs will be one of 
men in charge of the developmen 
the country-wide recreational I 
inent and will also act as publ 
agent for the league. 



CP 




Do Fertilizers Pay? 

The Government and Fducutional "Authori- 
ties" spend considerable public money in printing 
contradictory statements on this point. 

Great fortunes have been made in manufactur- 
ing fertilisers. They evidently pay the makers. 

Fanners <1>minue to increase their fertilizer 
purchases, -indicating that they are profitable to 
the farmer. 

But are the kinds which the manufacturers pre- 
fer to sell the most profitable to the farmer > Do 
they give the greatest profit consistent with main- 
taining the productiveness "f the soil ? Or do 
they merely supply the element most needed at 
the moment and reduce the available supply of 
the other elements ? 
The average fertilizer contains 4 times as much phosphoric acid as Potash. The 

average crop takes from the soil 3 times as much Potash as phosphoric acid. 

You can guess the answer. Use more Potash, for 

Potash Pays 

Send for FREE pamphlet on Profitable Farming, containing system of rational 
fertilizing and soil testing. 

GERMAN KALI WORKS, lac, 42 Broadway. New York 

Monadnock Heck. Chicago, III. task 4 Trust Bide. Savannah, Gs. Whitney Bank B'dg., Dm Ortstn, Li. 

Esipiii Buildlrik, Atlanta. 6a. 






E. E. MILLETT 

JEWKLKR anjj OPTOMETRIST 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Floricultural Dept. 



EXPERIMENT STATION NEWS 

Among other places where the col- 
lege is coming in for a little free ad- 
vertising may be mentioned the Old 
Farmer's Almanac. For many 
years this publication has been the 
farmers* reference book and guide in 
problems of both crops and weather 
and now we find the advice given to 
visit the state college and experiment 
and see the work that is being done 
and more especially to time the visit 
fur commencement week. "There is 
agooddenl of inspiration in attending 
tlic graduating exercises and in seeing 
the many young men and women 
who show their faith in agricultuie 
and home economics by choosing 
tacac vocations for their life work" 
BSJS the Almanac. If this advice is 
followed as closely as moat of that 
pven in the pamphlet, there will be 
I'nte a visitation here next June. 
Bulletin 165 
bulletin 165 under the title of 
I he Effect of .Sulfate of Ammonia 
un >oil" is now ready for free distri. 
biitinn at the Experiment Station. 
This work was prepared by K. W. 
Bopreohl and F. W. Morse of the 
kw staff ami l »is a record of ef- 
fort* to determine the changes which 
me been produced in a soil bv 
Tears of continuous use of sulfate of 
■ma an a fertiliser." The soil 
1 in the experiments, (the results 
which are tabulated) was taken 
' one of the oldest fields on the 
ii farm and a record of this 
I has lu»en kept foi .*»0 eonseeu- 
vears, during which time only 
eaJ fertilizers have been Hp- 



Lenses ground while you wait 

COLI I ■ i JKWKLMV 

Violin. Uanjo. Mandolin and (iuitar Serines ... rr . 

AHin.itvr, mass, ^ e °" er our sur P'»is stock of cut 

Nest to Host office. flowers and plants at icasonable rales 

to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
{ideal conditions. Roses, tarnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone aOO 



OUR PRICES ON HIGH-GRADE SUITS 

AND OVERCOATS ARE ALWAYS 

THE LOWEST 



Now to reduce our stock for inventory we are ofl 

stock of 



ering our entire 



.Ian. h when it registered -1 degrees 
below The hottest days of the year 
were Sept Hand Ifi when the mercury 
traveled up to 98 degrees. The 
summary for December shows that 
iluring the month there were but 
nine clear and six fair days and that 
more than .01 inch of rain or MOW 

feU on 12 different daye. The last 
da v of the month and year held the 

low temperature record foi the month 

with a thermometer reading of 2d* l,|s s,,u k is ma<It * B P °«" H»rt Schaflner and Marx Clothes 

grces at 7 A. M. 



Suits and Overcoats at a Reduction 
of 20% from the Regular Prices 



Hit' 

of 

f... 



I; 






■Bi * 



Bulletin No. 324. 

letin No. SSI entitled "Mete- 

Cai Observations at thi Masaa- 

*s Agricultural Experiment 

f i" in addition to the monthly 

ry of the weather for Decern- 

itains the yearly summary for 

ml shows that last year the 

• i ■imitation of rain and melted 

'ached the 51. AH inch mark. 

shows that the lowest mark 

by the thermometer was on 



NINETEENTHIRTEEN NOTES 

Ralph W. Howe, druggist. Wil- 
mington. Vt. 

"Dick" Hyland. M. S , Oregon 
Agricultural College, June, 191$, 
now Science teacher. Ilemet I'nion 
High School. Ilcmi't, ( al. 

"doe" Pillsluirv. Assistant Ento- 
mologist, State of Rhode Island, on 
leave of absence from Mureaii of 
Entomology. I*. S. I). A. Address, 
State House, Providence, K. I. 

Warren ('. Whitman tX-1918, 
Mass. Institute of Technology 1916, 
is now a chemist with II. A. Johnson 
Co., 221 State St., Itoston Home 
address. 62 i'haple St., Abington, 
Mass. 



gether with other high-grade lines. 



Stock up on Shirts-Manhattan Shirt Sale 



$2.00 Shirts 
$1.50 Shirts 



Now $1.55 
Now $1.15 



INSTRUCTORS CHANGE 
The course in advanced composi- 
tion, descriptive and narrative writ- 
ing, will be given in the second 
semeetSt by Protestor Neal instead 
of Professor Priice, This jb the 
course catalogued as Journalism 2. 
Instead of the advanced composition, 
Professor Prince will have the Amer- 
ican literature course. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



RELIABLE AGENTS WANTED 



►FOR- 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

No* st i \ Pleasant St. 
Oculists' l'i**cri|>tinnt FilM Broken LenSM 

Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and skilfully Don*. 

Sattstaction Guaranteed 



— Write for Particulai 
Local Agency Manager 



THE COE-MOR' 



COMPANY 



5t Chambers St., New York City. 










8 



Th „ M^gg^j ^tts Collegian, Tu esaay^Jan^^ie. 




JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

No»> touted uver po«l ollae. Up one Hi^ht 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal ticket System 1 Si. #- M 

t. mii;xtka. 

5H0B STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

O^en Sunday from 7-11 $• f** 1 Wl4 * t0 V - ' 

The Highland Hotel 

leiry run on the huropeiui flan. It U jtttf* =>">l> 
lro.il Main street, .iway Irom the '»«'« »»f dust 
and yet in the center t* the ouiiness duinct. 

Its r.>oin* are well tu.nished and coinf ortabte, 
rjvuis a teleunone and hot and cold running 

water in eve, y room. Prices St and up; room* 

with bath jingle) ai.5U and up. 
ItsexcelUnt cuisine and *eii ve.itiiatedd.rn.il! 

roo.n.nakes a mea. a phasant iW^^Wj 

turn* of the Highest quality, well cooked and 

served in tue best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel ^"fy™?™ 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Otters courses .rf instruction U. twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture. Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science- 

A student may specialize in cue foil-wing subjects: 



FOUNTAIN PENS 



Moore* Swa « s 

Waterman's 



1 mi. 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 
Agricultural Chemistry 



Thirty-six dozen pens to select f 

OUR RULE 

Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



Highland Hotel, 



tipriughelil, «»«•• 



STUDEHTFUBHIIUBE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

E. L>. MARSH ESTATE 



For complete catalog and illustrated oooklet. write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFieL-D. Pres,DENT 
AMHERST, MASS. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



WKNKKDU BOOK AGKNTS. 
Both sexes, for be.t^pubUalted. Panic,,, 

GKO. W. HUNKK8, I-*, 8*. A««a.tlne. m. 

COLLEGE SHOES 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 




Cox Sons & Vining 

7 j Madison Ave . New York 

Caps 
Gowns 
Hoods 

for all Degrees 



ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLERSY AMD CHOIR 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

17 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton. Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 



CUtmlmh Mm t A. M. to 4 A. M 



RAHAR'S INN 

MltSMMIitllS M ,,.,..l,..»rtl» 

EUBOFIAN PLAN 

TH» Bert !*>*<•* n» Worn 

,, ( ,tin nMin m i l UH eaeraasn 

All lUase •! **a *••« 

MHent Lunclnwin fmru 51 SO to J p.m 
S*ecUl D..hrt Bl AH M.ur. 

R, j. RAHAR. Prop. 



Associate Alumni, 

Jointcoinmittee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'd Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Truck Association. ^ 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle Club, 
Roister Doisters, 
Musical Association, 
Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 
Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index. 
Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 
M. A. C. Christian Association, 
M. A. C Catholic Club, 
Fraternity Conference, 
Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
S. W. Hall, President 

R. L. Holden, Manager 
A. W. Spaulding, Manager 

D. A. Ricker, Manager , 
A. Huntington, Jr., Manager 

N. Moorhouse, Manager 
H. Aiken, President 
J. T. Nicholson, Manager 
F. A. Anderson, Manager 
L. E. Fielding, Manager 
F. W. Mayo, Manager 
K. L. Messenger, Manager 
A. J. Hicks, President 
E. L. King, President 
• C. H. Gould, President 
E. F. Taber, President 



We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



Theft •« Seven i ... 1 KM«oa*«*| youthould 
buy your 

COAL 

or 

C. RIBJMBR_ 

Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

80 Mile* o* Trackage -nodern 
Equipment- Train DUpatch- 
Ing System Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 

E.M.BOLLESl 

THE SHOEMA* 

CARS 

Leave A001E COLLEOE lor IKH- 
YOKE at 15 mln. peat Ike Nw. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEQE at 7 and 11 mln. past the new- 



SfKWGMtlt 



AMHERST I SUNDERLAND ST. K. B 




Connecticut Valley Street Railway 

Comi 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manu facturers < 

UNIFORMS 

forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons. 



tt .l«kMt eervtee, *-t W.rfc. ^*'\^ 

^SnSmTOftwS, 

WM. r RAMI M». **j 
R,>r Nt»h Bl'k, Amhfrt. T 

Amherst 

CO - OP LAUNDR1 

High-Grade ColUge Wofi 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuff*. • 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry. 






DRY CLEARING AHD PFE5S1 

Steam Pressing, joe a Miit 
Dry Cleaning aad Pressing, *» S * 1 

R.T.FaoiT,Af*..t;D.B«s«iiiVAli xt** 
Put full ■*"•■ " nd »ddres» o 






*\>ll*Y3f^ 



Vol. XXVI. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 8, 1916. 



No. 17 



RELAY TEAM WINS BY 

DEFAULT IN W. P. I. RACE 

Bad Spill in Last Lap at B. A. A. 
Games Results in Worcester's For- 
feiting Race to M. A. C. 

Massachusetts Agricultural college 
defeated Worcester Polytechnic Insti- 
tute io a relay race at B. A. A. games 
held in Mecauics building Boston on 
Srturday evening. The constest was 
awarded to the Massachusetts team 
by default after it had been declared 
do race because neither anchor man 
brought home his owu baton. 
Moatroin, running the anchor position 
forM. A. C. was passing Bicker of 
Worcester when the latter tripped and 
fell carrying Mostrom down with him. 
Both runuers dropped their batons. 
The Worcester man did not make any 
attempt to pick up his baton but 
Mostrom went back and picked up 
what be supposed to be his own. but 
which the referee, Bartow S. Weeks 
of the New York Athletic Club ruled 
as belonging to Worcester. He then 
declared it no race and ordered that 
it lie run over later in the evening. 
This the W. P. 1. team would not do 
as two of their men were indisposed 
and the lace was therefore awarded 
to M. A. C Up to the lime of the 
accident the race was a nip and tuck 
affair. Babbitt, running first for M. 
A. ('■ took the pole from Cleveland 
of Worcester, banded over a slender 
lead to Captain Russell who kept 
ahead of Knowlton of Tech, leaving a 
yard to Montgomery. The freshman 
ran well against Greene of Worcester 
but the latter passed him on the last 
lap although the Aggie runner gained 
back some of the lost ground. Ricker 
starteil with a five yard lead on Mos- 
trom, who made up that distance on 
the first lap and was about to go by 
Kicker when the fall occured. The 
M. A. C. team showed much better 
form than they displayed last week 
in* I showed the result of Coach Dick- 
inson's hard work. There was not a 
team in the hall that excelled the 
\ggie four on the banks and none 
passed the baton any better, in fact 
he work of some of the teams entered 
<>m the larger colleges was sadly 
eflcient In the Utter particular. 
The meet as a whole was epectaou- 
ii David S. Caldwell, M. A. C. 
t.-MS won the Hunter mile from a 
eld of crack runners. Lying behind 
ntil the last lap as is his custom he 
tiled by Ray of Chicago and Leslie 

i< ontloued OB i»ge Sj 



ENTHUSIASTIC BOSTON ALUMNI PRESENT 
LOVING CUP TO PRESIDENT BUTTERFIELD 



TENTH ANNIVERSARY OF HIS COMING TO M. A. C. 



Over a Hundred Aggie Men Gather at Annual Banquet. 
Governor McCall Urges Alumni to Give Finan- 
cial Support to the College. 

A loving cup was preseuted to | secretary ; Franklin W. Davis '«:», 
President Kenyon L. Butterfield by treasurer ; and George B.Willard '!I2, 
the members of the Massachusetts Herbert W. Dana '99, and P. W. 
Alumni Club at Uieir annual reunion Piekard '1 1 directors, 
aud banquet at Young's hotel. Bos- 1 Sumner It. Parker gave an interest- 
ton, last Friday evening, in uommem- 1 ing talk on "Some Kxperiences with 
oration of his tea years work as 
president of the college and in token 
of their regard. The banquet was 
considered the must successful ever 
held, over a bundled alumni being 
preseut. Governor McCall, Lieut. - 
Gov. Coulidge, HerbertC. Bliss toast- 
master and p